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I'm not sure what you mean with "film segment" but a few seconds of "Food Glorious Food" could actually be heard at the start of the pop culture segment (= the segment where they showed the video clips of iconic British musicians together with snippets from TV shows and films). I believe that they also showed pictures from the "Oliver!" film on that fabric house while they played the music.

Well, I guess there could have been more. After the Chariots of Fire theme, there should have been more iconic bits and more of "Food glorious food" where a proper "High Tea" party could have taken place. I think less emphasis on props and more simple performers in iconic literature, film and TV costumes would do.

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Most of the time things just seemed hugely chaotic and I couldn't tell what was going on, the only scenes that I thought worked sort of well were the industrial segment as well as the NHS segment although I really didn't care for it. A good example of a chaotic scene would be the music segment, I had no idea what was going on.

I share some of your views. I didn't care for the music segment either. I just thought that the brilliance of the Industrial revolution segment was kinda lost a wee bit in later stages.

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Here's the thing I question: why Boyle concentrated so much on concepts which limited him and the show. Like why pick on the history of the friggin' Eastlands neighborhood? So what, if he lived there? London isn't the first city to rehabilitate a former junkyard neighborhood and turn it into an Olympic Park. The whole idea of 'industrialization' as part of the show is valid, but why give it the bkgd of 'his' neighborhood?

And then why certain, select industries only -- the NHS, the film/Tv industry--of the UK? What about its Armed Forces, finance, shipping, musical theatre? It seemed very limiting and a "look-at-me-here" feel to it. Film Industry, when only one film was used? Where were Lawrence of Arabia, Brief Encounter, The THird Man, etc., etc.

His concept was muddled and quite narrow.

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Most of the time things just seemed hugely chaotic and I couldn't tell what was going on, the only scenes that I thought worked sort of well were the industrial segment as well as the NHS segment although I really didn't care for it. A good example of a chaotic scene would be the music segment, I had no idea what was going on.

The Parade of nations would have been perfect for most of that British Music in their full form (rather than just a brief mix), whilst the music segment should have just been a few iconic numbers, played mostly full, whilst the Beatles' homage from earlier could have been done in this part instead of that awful love story.

Literary characters for the literature part, Charlie Chaplins and something else for the film part, Daleks and something else for television, Beatles fans and something else for music. These would have been performers coming into the field, doing their routine and staying there up until the Abide with me or Parade of Nations bit.

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I wonder if installing all those LEDs for the seats took a huge portion of the budget or something?

If it was, it was certainly underused. Perhaps it's just because TV showed more of the performances on field rather than the LEDs. To me it seemed that these could have done more graphics and such.

Most ceremonies have some sort of story to follow, this one was just throwing different elements in there all the time expecting it to work.

I thought it was nicely chronological, it just got lame by the music and love story part.

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I wonder if installing all those LEDs for the seats took a huge portion of the budget or something?

I'm sure that was pretty costly but it was all part of the budget and certainly not at the expense of the central action and subject matter that had to be staged.

Most ceremonies have some sort of story to follow, this one was just throwing different elements in there all the time expecting it to work.

It was more episodic rather than an overall, overriding arc.

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Here's the thing I question: why Boyle concentrated so much on concepts which limited him and the show. Like why pick on the history of the friggin' Eastlands neighborhood? So what, if he lived there? London isn't the first city to rehabilitate a former junkyard neighborhood and turn it into an Olympic Park. The whole idea of 'industrialization' as part of the show is valid, but why give it the bkgd of 'his' neighborhood?

And then why certain, select industries only -- the NHS, the film/Tv industry--of the UK? What about its Armed Forces, finance, shipping, musical theatre? It seemed very limiting and a "look-at-me-here" feel to it. Film Industry, when only one film was used? Where were Lawrence of Arabia, Brief Encounter, The THird Man, etc., etc.

His concept was muddled and quite narrow.

I think the industrialization section both represented the fact that UK was first nation on earth to become industrialised and also that a former industrial area in London had been regenerated. I didn't get the sense it was dedicated solely to his neighbourhood -- that actor (Kenneth Brannagh) was I think playing Isambard Kingdom Brunel and so 'overseeing' the Industrialization process. I think that's what I saw.lol. And I think that was sublime -- clever in a really conceptual way especially considering that historical representation that was the Industrial revolution would give rise to the forged ring. I thought that was great.

I agree about the music/film segment. I didn't like it either. Something better could have been achieved. Don't know what though. However, I did like the rocket men in the sky whilst the Bowie song was playing.

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Some people clearly didn't get it!

Here's the thing I question: why Boyle concentrated so much on concepts which limited him and the show. Like why pick on the history of the friggin' Eastlands neighborhood? So what, if he lived there? London isn't the first city to rehabilitate a former junkyard neighborhood and turn it into an Olympic Park. The whole idea of 'industrialization' as part of the show is valid, but why give it the bkgd of 'his' neighborhood?

It wasn't about the East End at all - indeed it was about as non-specific as you could get when it comes to British history as the story really applies to virtually anywhere in the country.

The Parade of nations would have been perfect for most of that British Music in their full form (rather than just a brief mix), whilst the music segment should have just been a few iconic numbers, played mostly full, whilst the Beatles' homage from earlier could have been done in this part instead of that awful love story.

They didn't have the beat for the parade - the music for that was especially chosen in order to encourage the athletes to move quicker,. Clearly though the ceremony wasn't to your taste, which is fine, but it resonated brilliantly with Brits and avoided the obvious. I think comments here also show how ceremonies really need to be the vision of one director rather than designed by committee.

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Hey, if you want the athletes to move a bit faster, then you simply have them march in formation and have the background music played at a slightly faster speed, just ever so slightly.

I thought it was average to slightly above average sure. It could have easily have added the obvious references to British culture and still been highly praised for it.

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Don't appreciate personal derogatory abuse on here just for posting my opinions.

Please keep that sort of filth language for elsewhere

I don't appreciate your snidey remarks. You're a prick mate. I call a spade a spade, you're a prick.

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I don't appreciate your snidey remarks. You're a prick mate. I call a spade a spade, you're a prick.

Well, that person you're calling a "prick" also happened to be one of the many "pricks" who worked for a living paying for your dole checks when you were on yer benefits. Just calling a spade a spade mate.

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^^ That was the core problem of Danny Boyle. He's more than happy to use a volunteer cast, some other professional artists and the like, but he will always insist to have his guys involved somehow, which somewhat ruins the show as it's more about Danny's crazy ambitions than anything else.

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Would anyone appreciate an opinion from a Yank who has been watching these things since London?

I thought the ceremony over all was very good. I saw the NBC broadcast, so I missed some stuff (especially the mourning ballet for 7/7). I also missed a bit of Satanic Mills while fixing some dinner, but excepting those holes, I saw everything.

The opening with the pastoral to the forging of the Rings was absolutely breathtaking and a tremendous rendition of modern history, not just British. Very well done.

The entrance of James Bond with the Queen was a trip and very nice to see the Queen with a sense of humor.

I'm really not sure why people are complaining about the rendition of God Save The Queen. A lot of those children singing were clearly profoundly deaf or had other disabilities. It was meant to be moving and inspiring, and I can easily say mission accomplished there.

The Children's Dreams and Nightmares segement was great fun, although I found myself wishing for more English lit references. What, no Lord of the Rings? Aside from the Giant Baby at the end, I enjoyed it.

And now, the topic that caused some controversy... Modern Music and 20th Century Love. I must be in the great minority, but I loved this! It was a different take on the more direct version of Pastoral Fields and Satanic Mills, showing the evolution of British culture through music. I was personally delighted hearing parts of the stadium singing along to Queen and Blowing Bubbles. My personal preference and not the greatest part of the ceremony, but I got it and I enjoyed it.

Chariots of Fire... Well, they had to do it and have a bit of fun with it, didn't they? Not complaining, it did make me smile.

Parade of Nations... Not sure if it was edited much in the US but it did seem to move at a good clip compared to the three HOUR drudge there was in Beijing.

The procession of the Olympic flag I did enjoy and one of the most tear jerking moments of the night for me was seeing the flag pause in front of Ali. Seeing one of the most gregarious athletes of all time and the man who lit the cauldron sixteen years ago laid low by human fragility on the Olympic stage perhaps for the last time was very touching to me.

For people wondering about the Oaths, sometimes the athletes oath is broadcast, but rarely both. There have always been athletes and judges and officials oaths, just not always covered.

And finally, my SOLE complaint of the evening: The Cauldron. Do not get me wrong, the lighting was breathtaking, the formation of the cauldron and how it was lit was very clever. But the problem for me was I knew this was not the cauldrons final home due t the track and field events and was hoping to see it move to its final site before the ceremony ended. Ah well.

So, overall, where does London rest among my ceremony memories? Probably behind Sydney and Atlanta so far in the top three, but I really need to watch it again and evaluate more to solidify it. But there you have it, the opinions of one man for the two people who care.

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Would anyone appreciate an opinion from a Yank who has been watching these things since London?

I thought the ceremony over all was very good. I saw the NBC broadcast, so I missed some stuff (especially the mourning ballet for 7/7). I also missed a bit of Satanic Mills while fixing some dinner, but excepting those holes, I saw everything.

The opening with the pastoral to the forging of the Rings was absolutely breathtaking and a tremendous rendition of modern history, not just British. Very well done.

The entrance of James Bond with the Queen was a trip and very nice to see the Queen with a sense of humor.

I'm really not sure why people are complaining about the rendition of God Save The Queen. A lot of those children singing were clearly profoundly deaf or had other disabilities. It was meant to be moving and inspiring, and I can easily say mission accomplished there.

The Children's Dreams and Nightmares segement was great fun, although I found myself wishing for more English lit references. What, no Lord of the Rings? Aside from the Giant Baby at the end, I enjoyed it.

And now, the topic that caused some controversy... Modern Music and 20th Century Love. I must be in the great minority, but I loved this! It was a different take on the more direct version of Pastoral Fields and Satanic Mills, showing the evolution of British culture through music. I was personally delighted hearing parts of the stadium singing along to Queen and Blowing Bubbles. My personal preference and not the greatest part of the ceremony, but I got it and I enjoyed it.

Chariots of Fire... Well, they had to do it and have a bit of fun with it, didn't they? Not complaining, it did make me smile.

Parade of Nations... Not sure if it was edited much in the US but it did seem to move at a good clip compared to the three HOUR drudge there was in Beijing.

The procession of the Olympic flag I did enjoy and one of the most tear jerking moments of the night for me was seeing the flag pause in front of Ali. Seeing one of the most gregarious athletes of all time and the man who lit the cauldron sixteen years ago laid low by human fragility on the Olympic stage perhaps for the last time was very touching to me.

For people wondering about the Oaths, sometimes the athletes oath is broadcast, but rarely both. There have always been athletes and judges and officials oaths, just not always covered.

And finally, my SOLE complaint of the evening: The Cauldron. Do not get me wrong, the lighting was breathtaking, the formation of the cauldron and how it was lit was very clever. But the problem for me was I knew this was not the cauldrons final home due t the track and field events and was hoping to see it move to its final site before the ceremony ended. Ah well.

So, overall, where does London rest among my ceremony memories? Probably behind Sydney and Atlanta so far in the top three, but I really need to watch it again and evaluate more to solidify it. But there you have it, the opinions of one man for the two people who care.

Nice post and an interesting read. I think I agreed with pretty much everything you said (more or less).

Thanks! :)

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Parade of Nations... Not sure if it was edited much in the US but it did seem to move at a good clip compared to the three HOUR drudge there was in Beijing.

The procession of the Olympic flag I did enjoy and one of the most tear jerking moments of the night for me was seeing the flag pause in front of Ali. Seeing one of the most gregarious athletes of all time and the man who lit the cauldron sixteen years ago laid low by human fragility on the Olympic stage perhaps for the last time was very touching to me.

For people wondering about the Oaths, sometimes the athletes oath is broadcast, but rarely both. There have always been athletes and judges and officials oaths, just not always covered.

Appreciate and enjoyed your comments, but have a few to respond back to you...

- Watching the parade live from CTV here in Canada, it was one of the fastest moving that I recall!

- I can understand your appreciation for Ali. I was shocked and amazed when I saw him standing there, torch in hand, in Atlanta and I've even seen that very torch at his museum in Louisville. But for me, this was the most awkward moment of the London ceremony. Maybe if he had been joined by other great Olympians either representing their achievements or the frailty of humanity it might have connected better with me, but it didn't work for me.

- And finally, since NBC cut all three (yes, I said three) oaths, you should know they have now added a coaches oath. Although, it was somewhat clumsily worded. Not as eloquent as that of the athletes and officials.

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