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Not true. I think it's Brazil and Argentina fans that are a concern.

You haven't been alive long enough to know how badly behaved England supporters can be!

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The "international" Rio And one of our dangerous neighbors: They are all welcome!

- Did you say fruit, candy or girl?

Subway in Rio with decoration for the World Cup

You haven't been alive long enough to know how badly behaved England supporters can be!

Isn't that rather the point? The problem was a decade ago and few countries have put in greater efforts to counter it than us. There are hardly ever big problems when England travels now.

Tony is right here, from what I've read - and this shouldn't be surprising given the location of this world cup - Argentine 'gangs' are the biggest worry in terms of travelling support.

Hopefully nothing will happen though and security will be well thought out.

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Based on recent history; Germany, Russia, Croatia, and Bosnia. I actually think the biggest potential for trouble is today with Brazil vs. Croatia. Ze Dom; spremni.

Edited by de snelle rode duivels
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The barras tend to 'behave' more when travelling outside the country, but still, I don't want to see them going to Brazil for any reason. Even then, it will be very difficult to deport them all, since only 2000 of them (who are on the list I spoke about before) have criminal records of any sort.

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Not true. I think it's Brazil and Argentina fans that are a concern.

Brazilians?

In 100 years of national team we have 0 cases of national team supporters misbehaving.

Our dangerous "hooligans" are those from clubs and they are so blind passionate about their clubs that they don't even follow the news about the national team...

You have no idea about what you are talking about.

----

I'm sure Argentine barra bravas will behave cool in Brazil because they know how Brazilian police treats them.

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According to a news in Portuguese, all 2100 fans from the list sent by argentine police will be deported. Brazilian police just arrested a man crossing the border by bus. An american was also arrested at the airport after FBI collaboration. He is accused of pedophilia.

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TELA is simply inflaming a topic with unthought out silly comments. This is his fourth WC from natural memory going by his age. He clearly doesn't remember the bad ol days!

There are always going to be elements in all fan supporters that are passionate about Football that could be described as excessive, and then you will have amongst those the Hooligans who just go out of their way to spoil everything.

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TELA is simply inflaming a topic with unthought out silly comments. This is his fourth WC from natural memory going by his age. He clearly doesn't remember the bad ol days!

There are always going to be elements in all fan supporters that are passionate about Football that could be described as excessive, and then you will have amongst those the Hooligans who just go out of their way to spoil everything.

I think the only incidents I remember involve Russia, Poland, Croatia, Serbia and Germany. And I think Germany was being attacked from one of the first 4.

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England supporters in Manaus!!!

Inglaterra_torcedores-em-Manaus-1260x710

:D Ye gawds! Watch out, they'll sail it down the Amazon and out into the Atlantic and home!

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Im rather excited for Saturday now. The lack of pressure on the England team from home makes for a refreshing atmosphere.

Congratulations to the Brazilian team and supporters on an amazing rendition of their anthem, totally jaw dropping moment.

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Im rather excited for Saturday now. The lack of pressure on the England team from home makes for a refreshing atmosphere.

Congratulations to the Brazilian team and supporters on an amazing rendition of their anthem, totally jaw dropping moment.

Yep. it was.

And great minds think alike re: the ceremony. I tweeted the same thing as you two minutes before you last night..

Edited by Rob.
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Congratulations to the Brazilian team and supporters on an amazing rendition of their anthem, totally jaw dropping moment.

The anthem thing helped Brazil a lot in the Confederations Cup, but yesterday, the players were crying of emotion and the team started the match very sleepy... The need to use the anthem to boost the performance, not to get emotional...

But, yes, it's beautiful to see Brazilians singing the anthem. I cried too.

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Barras in Rio.... at least 850 to be present at the stadium on sunday :angry:

http://www.ole.com.ar/mundial-2014/Largo-barratour_0_1156084463.html

Calm down, LDOG, with all this media, there is big chances some of them will be caught up before enter the stadium.

And maybe, they even can behave nice... Who knows?

Interesting article

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/foreigners/2014/06/brazil_s_world_cup_will_this_be_the_last_world_cup_hosted_by_a_democracy.html

Democracy’s Last World Cup?

The cost and corruption that comes with the games makes them appealing to dictators, not democracies.

By Anne Applebaum

450505372-general-view-of-the-arena-during-the-2014-fifa-world

The opening match between Brazil and Croatia at Arena de Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Photo by Kevin Cox/Getty Images

LONDON—Like a time-honored ritual, the run-up to any world-class sporting event is always the same. A few months before, the stadiums aren't ready and the hotels have no hot water. The highways are dirt tracks and the athletes have nowhere to sleep. The local newspapers predict calamity. Will the beach volleyball final not be held for lack of a net? Will the qualifying match between Paraguay and Ivory Coast be abandoned because the referees couldn't land at the unfinished airport?

But it never happens. Somehow, the Olympics, or the World Cup, or whatever impossibly extravagant spectacle is in question, always goes on. The South Africans or the Russians or the British work all day and all night, throw money at the infrastructure, and pull it off: The basketball arena is finished, the ski jump is a triumph.

The vast expenditures required to host the biggest international sports competitions outweigh the benefits.

This week, the same ritual has unfolded once again. Less than 48 hours before the first match of the 2014 World Cup, the Brazilian president, Dilma Rousseff, took to the airwaves to declare that the "pessimists" had been defeated and her country was ready to greet the world. And if Brazil continues to follow the pattern, the moment of crisis will indeed pass. Relief will lead to euphoria—the national mood will lift, the crowds will be harmonious, the national team will be cheered—which will in turn be replaced by ... regret.

The recent historical record is unambiguous. Several of South Africa's stadiums—like many of those in South Korea and Japan, which jointly hosted the World Cup in 2002, or those Beijing built for the 2008 Olympics—are scarcely used. The concrete poured for the Sochi Winter Olympics is already cracking. The widely trumpeted post-Olympic regeneration of East London has yet to materialize. Almost everywhere, the vast expenditures now required to host the biggest international sports competitions heavily outweigh the benefits.

The aftermath in Brazil will be different only because the regret arrived in advance. For months now, protesters of various stripes have picketed stadiums, dressed the World Cup mascot up as a Mafioso, and created street art, including paintings of a child with nothing but a soccer ball to eat. Having watched the mounting bills and diminishing payoffs that followed the World Cup in other countries, Brazilian voters already know that some of their stadiums will become white elephants. They don't need to wait until the tourists go home in order to learn that money thrown around during the last-minute construction frenzy will be wasted.

Around the world, other governments have observed Brazilians' reaction. In recent months, German, Swiss, Swedish, and Polish bids to hold the 2022 Winter Olympics have been withdrawn over concerns about cost. Munich and Davos-St. Moritz withdrew after voters rejected their Olympic bids. So did Krakow, where more than 70 percent voted against the idea in a referendum, despite the perceived success of the feel-good European soccer championships held in Poland and Ukraine in 2012.

The only remaining bidders for 2022 are likely to be Beijing and Almaty, Kazakhstan, both of which are, not coincidentally, authoritarian countries where the voters' views will not be taken into account, where street protesters will not be allowed to picket the half-built stadiums, and where leaders jump at the chance to strut on the world stage. For similar reasons, the location of the next two World Cups isn't a coincidence either: Russia will host in 2018 and Qatar in 2022. Bribery on a massive scale partly explains Qatar's successful bid—the Sunday Times of London has found "millions" of emails and banks statements to prove it—but so does both countries' confidence that there won't be any opposition, and certainly no unpleasant referendums. Among other things, the Qataris, unlike the Brazilians, know they can finance their World Cup construction projects with the use of virtual slave labor: More than 400 Nepali construction workers have already died on World Cup construction sites.

Democracies can't get away with this kind of abuse. Nor would most elected leaders relish a repeat of the massive Brazilian street protests that have sent President Rousseff's poll ratings plummeting. The Brazilians still have to get through the 2016 Summer Olympics, and Tokyo will host in 2020—assuming that neither is derailed by protests or angry voters. In the future, maybe democratic governments won't be able to get away with spending the billions on sports that now seem to be required. Brazil's World Cup will be the last to be held in a democracy for eight years. Will it be the last one ever?

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Calm down, LDOG, with all this media, there is big chances some of them will be caught up before enter the stadium.

And maybe, they even can behave nice... Who knows?

I'm angry because they are handed tickets which could have been given to normal, good fans who instead have to work their ass to get them.

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I'm angry because they are handed tickets which could have been given to normal, good fans who instead have to work their ass to get them.

You have a valid point and I agree totally.

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