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Puerto Rico and it's Olympic Future


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In November, there will be a referendum to determine the future status of Puerto Rico. This includes statehood, independence or free association with the United States. If Puerto Rico becomes a state, London 2012 would be the last time that the Puerto Ricans walk into an Olympic Games as a separate country. Statehood could change the sporting landscape in the United States.

In other words, Rio 2016 could be the first time that Puerto Ricans walk into the Olympics as an official part of the United States (Rio 2016 will also probably be the debut of South Sudan to the Olympics).

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In November, there will be a referendum to determine the future status of Puerto Rico. This includes statehood, independence or free association with the United States. If Puerto Rico becomes a state, London 2012 would be the last time that the Puerto Ricans walk into an Olympic Games as a separate country. Statehood could change the sporting landscape in the United States.

In other words, Rio 2016 could be the first time that Puerto Ricans walk into the Olympics as an official part of the United States (Rio 2016 will also probably be the debut of South Sudan to the Olympics).

Well it would pretty much kill sports in Puerto Rico. Most of PR`s athletes aren`t good enough to compete with the USA. I think PR should choose independence.

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Puerto Rico is a big sports player in the Americas but not so much globally, with the exception of pro boxing where its relatively powerfull. Apart from removing one of the better country from the pan-ams, allong with riding us of a good men's Basketball and Volleyball team, this would have a minor impact outside of Puerto Rico itself.

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Wouldn't statehood also effect any prospecting San Juan 2024 Olympics bid? They would now have to directly compete with other US cities for nomination, rather than just getting the approval of Washington DC.

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That's besides the point. If Puerto Rico attains statehood, then any bid (we would like to see another, admit it!) would be bound for failure from the start on account of more viable American cities being put forward.

With them currently being Commonwealth, they can bid as they please since the IOC recognizes them as a NOC. Any future bid will be a vast improvement from their 2004 bid, using legacy venues from that bid such as the arena and convention center, as well as key infrastructure such as the metro. They won't win, but it would be nice if they bid again. After all, why go to all the trouble of doing a lone bid if you're not considering trying again in the future?

Edited by Lord David
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Don't worry. They will not become part of the United States, because a lot of people in PR are still very patriotic and are resentful of them (remember when Romero Barcelo got booed by all the stadium at the 1979 Pan Am Games because of his pro-anexation position?).

But at the same time, they don't want to become fully independent because politicians in Puerto Rico, just like in most of Latin America, are the worst of the worst. So, because of convenience, they always wanted to keep being a Commonwealth.

I think this situation will be the same for this year.

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Don't worry. They will not become part of the United States, because a lot of people in PR are still very patriotic and are resentful of them (remember when Romero Barcelo got booed by all the stadium at the 1979 Pan Am Games because of his pro-anexation position?).

But at the same time, they don't want to become fully independent because politicians in Puerto Rico, just like in most of Latin America, are the worst of the worst. So, because of convenience, they always wanted to keep being a Commonwealth.

I think this situation will be the same for this year.

I'm interested in this, so each preceeding referendum the yes vote has grown higher and higher, will they really change to vote no? Also, do you think the PNP be beaten by the PDP then?

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I'd be happy with Puerto Rico as an independent country or maintaining the status quo. I see no reason why Puerto Rico can't be a sovereign nation. There are countries with weaker economies and smaller numbers of people, and no one is saying that their sovereignty should be taken away from them or that they shouldn't have sovereignty in the first place.

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They will NOT become a state because: 1. they will have to pay their share of federal taxes; and 2. they will lose their Miss Universe, World and International franchises--i.e., they cannot enter those pageants as a "sovereign state" which they sort of do as a Commonwealth.

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I'd be happy with Puerto Rico as an independent country or maintaining the status quo. I see no reason why Puerto Rico can't be a sovereign nation. There are countries with weaker economies and smaller numbers of people, and no one is saying that their sovereignty should be taken away from them or that they shouldn't have sovereignty in the first place.

For each of the referendum's up until now the vote for statehood has been growing. The New Progressive Party (PNP in Spanish, also the statehood party) has controlled both the Puerto Rican House & Senate since 2004, and in 2008 the people elected the PNP candidate's to Governor and Resident Commissioner. So, the PNP now controls both houses of Legislature and the Executive. It would appear the people are leaning towards statehood.

They will NOT become a state because: 1. they will have to pay their share of federal taxes; and 2. they will lose their Miss Universe, World and International franchises--i.e., they cannot enter those pageants as a "sovereign state" which they sort of do as a Commonwealth.

Ohh I forgot the super mega importance of the Miss Universe contestant how could I have been so silly, of course you're right the people will never want to lose that.

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They will NOT become a state because: 1. they will have to pay their share of federal taxes; and 2. they will lose their Miss Universe, World and International franchises--i.e., they cannot enter those pageants as a "sovereign state" which they sort of do as a Commonwealth.

First things first! Miss Universe!

I just shake my head, Shrek. For multiple reasons.

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Puerto Ricans are unique in the Americas in that, despite numbering around 8 million people, they don't have their own sovereign homeland. I just can't see Puerto Rico as the 51st state. It's more than simply competing in Miss Universe or the Olympics separate from the USA. Puerto Rico has a unique identity, and I fear that statehood would cause that identity to be lost. Maintaining the status quo, becoming independent, or acquiring free association would allow Puerto Rico to keep its identity. Besides, there are poorer countries in the Caribbean whose independence and sovereignity is not up for debate. Haiti is perhaps the poorest country in the free world, and no one is saying that France or any country should take over because of what's going on there.

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One thing that interests me in recent times about Puerto Rico and its Olympic history was how it particpated in the 1980 Moscow Olympics, despite being a US commonwealth and assuming it would just follow Jimmy Carter's demand to boycott. The US Virgin Islands didn't compete. Its basketball team was its shining light and qualified for it but ultimately didn't go as several other Americas teams like Argentina, Canada, and the US of course. How did Puerto Rico defied the boycott? A book could be written about all that, and how it did, and the broadcasting. If Americans were lucky, it could've gotten them on PR TV like maybe Telemundo through satelitte.

I agree, Puerto Rico just has too much of a distinct Spanish identity that could get lost if it got statehood in the US.

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I agree, Puerto Rico just has too much of a distinct Spanish identity that could get lost if it got statehood in the US.

The thing is, they are spineless leeches--enjoying a lot of benefits and protection of a large power; yet bringing nothing to the table. I once worked with this arrogant Puerto Rican girl and I tested her. I asked her about their passports; and she boldly lied that they had their own...which of course, isn't true. I gave her a look which said: you ain't fooling me, honey!! We didn't get along to say the least.

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The thing is, they are spineless leeches--enjoying a lot of benefits and protection of a large power; yet bringing nothing to the table

Wyoming, Delaware, Vermont, Idaho, West Virginia, the Dakotas... :rolleyes: Why not bring PR to the team?

NOTE: This silly list is provided by an old friend of mine who lives in Cheyenne, ok? Please don't bitch on it.

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Wyoming, Delaware, Vermont, Idaho, West Virginia, the Dakotas... :rolleyes: Why not bring PR to the team?

NOTE: This silly list is provided by an old friend of mine who lives in Cheyenne, ok? Please don't bitch on it.

What r u talking about? They are part of the contiguous 48.

Also, 51 states would mess up the 50 stars arrangement on the flag.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

Um, they are part of the United States.

But its residents can't vote in presidential elections to elect him or her as a US commonwealth territory. Does send a delegate to Congress but can't vote in proceedings.

Now things are getting very interesting. Puerto Ricans WANT to become a state. It's all up to Congress now. Nothing like a recession to hit you hard. Do the voters realize the long-term consequences to their international sports prospects, not to mention the Olympic broadcasting coverage like they enjoy now with having not just NBC's family of networks (including Telemundo) but Puerto Rico TV, Puerto Rico Sports Network, and Teleisla?

7 November 2012

Puerto Rico wants to become the 51st state of the US

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Puerto Ricans turned out in large numbers to vote on their territory's status

Voters in Puerto Rico have supported a non-binding referendum to become a full US state.

The measure will require approval from the US Congress, but President Barack Obama has said he will respect the vote. The island is currently a US territory, which uses the dollar and whose citizens travel on US passports. But it does not return senators to the US Congress and is represented in Washington by a non-voting delegate. Almost 80% of the island's electorate took part in the referendum, the fourth in the past 45 years. With almost all the votes counted, almost 54% voted to change the island's relationship with the US. And in reply to a second question on what future they favoured, nearly two-thirds wanted full statehood. If Congress grants its approval, Puerto Ricans would have the right to vote in all US elections, but would also have to pay federal taxes, something at present they are excused from.

Puerto Rico

  • In 1898 the Spanish lost the Caribbean Island at the end of the Spanish-American war and it came under US control
  • In 1917 its people became US citizens - they are allowed to serve in the military but still do not have the right to vote in US presidential elections
  • The country is a self-governing territory of the US but the US Congress and the president have ultimate control, providing social services, foreign policy and defence
  • They have a congressional representative who does not have voting rights
  • Becoming a state would see the Puerto Ricans having to pay federal taxes - currently they are exempt - but they would have the same rights as those on the mainland

The island came under US control in 1898 when Spain lost the island at the end of the Spanish-American war. Ties were strengthened in 1917 when Puerto Ricans became US citizens and were allowed to serve in the military.

"No other option"

There are now almost a million more Puerto Ricans in the US than on the island. Supreme Court judge Sonia Sotomayor, singer Jennifer Lopez and the former jazz musician Tito Puente are all of Puerto Rican descent, though all three were born in New York. Ties between the island and the mainland are strong and many on the island considered it inevitable that a full union be requested. A young voter in the capital San Juan, Jerome Lefebre, said: "Puerto Rico has to be a state. There is no other option. "We're doing okay, but we could do better. We would receive more benefits, a lot more financial help." But that opinion was rejected by Ramon Lopez de Azua: "Puerto Rico's problem is not its political status. "I think that the United States is the best country in the world, but I am Puerto Rican first."

The island has been hit hard by the current recession - it has debts of $68bn (£42bn) and unemployment is more than 13%. President Barack Obama, who visited the island last year, has said he will respect the will of Puerto Ricans if there is a clear majority. Any change would require approval by the US Congress, but no territory has ever been denied a petition for admission to the States.

BBC

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No other option"

There are now almost a million more Puerto Ricans in the US than on the island. Supreme Court judge Sonia Sotomayor, singer Jennifer Lopez and the former jazz musician Tito Puente are all of Puerto Rican descent, though all three were born in New York.

Don't forget Ricky Martin!! :lol:

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I just posted this in the other thread, but it seems appropriate here too:

Just because Puerto Rico wants to be a state doesn't mean the US has to let them in. There's a huge upside to statehood for Puerto Rico in terms of tax dollars. However, there really isn't any upside for the rest of the Union or for the federal governement. Puerto Rico would mainly just be a drain on resources.

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Except for the possibilty

I just posted this in the other thread, but it seems appropriate here too:

Just because Puerto Rico wants to be a state doesn't mean the US has to let them in. There's a huge upside to statehood for Puerto Rico in terms of tax dollars. However, there really isn't any upside for the rest of the Union or for the federal governement. Puerto Rico would mainly just be a drain on resources.

I agree. Except for the possibilty that Puerto Ricans in a presidential election could very well vote Democratic (if not or with Green, Socialist, Justice, Peace and Freedom, etc.) as they expand further into the already liberal Latino vote. There actually is a brain drain going on there if you read USA Today's story on it months ago. A need to reinvest there could help.

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