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London 2012 Olympic Cauldron...


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Put this on the record: The official final torch bearer who lit London 2012's cauldron is Austin Playfoot, age 82, on a dingy cherry picker, accompanied by a random construction worker. This will definitely go down in history book, well done LOCOG

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2180965/Olympic-cauldron-extinguished-moved-new-position-stadium-tickets-it.html

article-2180965-14498517000005DC-507_470x681.jpg

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hi mates!

just back home from london....

so, i tell you, london is great, great organization, great services, great safety, great atmosphere in the City, CEREMONY AMAZING.

Very good, i'm happy, BUT.....but the cauldron.....nooooo goooood!not fair!

I came from italy to watch the ceremony, i did somersaults to be near the stadium, i sold my ticket cause cant found one more to my girlfriend, i watched the ceremony out of stadium in a bar, 25 pounds to stay there, and when i sow the couldron i said:maybe is better that i have deep pokets now.

no good, no good no good,

is bad!

london is great but every times hapens this things, every time that London do this i think that London is SNOB!

IF YOU DON'T MIND THE PEOPLES THAT ARE OUT, SO MUCH LONDONERS, WITH HEART, TO CELEBRATE, TO BE HAPPY, TO BREATH THE OLYMPIC AIR, THE PEOPLE THAT VERY CARE THE SPIRIT.....IF YOU DON'T MIND ALL THIS PEOPLE....YOU ARE SNOB!

so, London is maybe the best olympic city of last 20 years, even more, but i'm so sad because it missed the most important thing.....

what you think about?

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As I stopped checking the cauldron thread 2 weeks before the ceremony, I have no idea how much details of it was leaked or sussed out by you all.

But I suspect one of the reasons Heatherwick came out with this small, collapsible, in-stadium only design is so that he can keep this as a secret to the very last moment. Which it totally works, nobody will know about it other than the few at midnight testing and no erection of tower outside the stadium which is impossible to hide.

He has said exactly that - the starting point for the design was that they didn't want the cauldron visible until the lighting. Last week when none of us knew or sussed that out that seemed great, but now it's reinforced the two weeks after it is lit is far more important than the two weeks before.

It's not the first time the olympic flame went out during the games. London is fast becoming a carbon copy of the 1976 games bar the labour strikes and debt. People now have to learn to accept that things won't always go to plan or their liking and Olympic organisers are only human just like the rest of us and they do make mistakes.

This games remind me of the 1976 games, cauldron wise. The cauldron in 1976 went out in a storm during the games and had to be relit. But people there in Montreal probably were probably complaining about the half finished tower and the debt more so then the location of the cauldron.

The location of the cauldron is a matter for the organisers to decide and I can't understand why people are complaining about the location of the cauldron. The times when people couldn't see the cauldron from the outside were in 1948, 1976, 1988 and now so there's nothing new there. Frankly I think we have become a generation of whingers who should be appreciating and celebrating the Games.

Oh no, we'll have the debt too I'm sure. And they've tried for the strikes.

Although I really would prefer it visible outside the stadium my main issue with the location is if it was always intended to remain within the stadium it should have been lit in it's final position - it's an absolute farce having to extinguish it and move it. Frankly I don't think it looks that great in the final position either (though I'm sure it'll look better by Friday). Also they really should have invited at least one of the young athletes from Friday to relight it today.

The cauldron looks all burnt at the petals. Wonder if they can clean it up before sending back to the countries.

fewi.jpg

I just don't see what each nation would do with them - they're not going to be as look after as the entire structure would be in London. I suspect though they'll get the petals that were carried out on Friday - I don't believe for one minute the ones we saw in the athletes parade were the ones on the cauldron we saw moments later.

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Put this on the record: The official final torch bearer who lit London 2012's cauldron is Austin Playfoot, age 82, on a dingy cherry picker, accompanied by a random construction worker. This will definitely go down in history book, well done LOCOG

http://www.dailymail...tickets-it.html

article-2180965-14498517000005DC-507_470x681.jpg

I didn't know that the cauldron could be extinguished and then relighted. Jim must be crazy now. He complained that Rio would break some traditions and now this.

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The article says they kept the flame burning in a miner's lamp. So at least the 'original' flame is still intact -- assuming that they lit the lamp from one of the petals that the torchbearers lit (and assuming that it was the flame from the torch that ignited the petal and not just a Barcelona-type ignition).

Given these assumptions, I've no problem with the cauldron being extinguished for transfer. Given the cauldron's low height and seemingly fragile structure, I don't think moving it to a spot in the park would be a good idea.

If you want a WTF-what-have-they-done-to-the-flame moment, look no further than Torino 2006. Heck, even the Barcelona cauldron lighting was technically sacrilegious.

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The article says they kept the flame burning in a miner's lamp. So at least the 'original' flame is still intact -- assuming that they lit the lamp from one of the petals that the torchbearers lit (and assuming that it was the flame from the torch that ignited the petal and not just a Barcelona-type ignition).

.

They don't have to relight it from one of those petals. They keep at least two of the original miner's lamps (lit at Olympia) on hand. Two of the miner's lamps traveled with the Torch Relay; one stayed at the LOCOG (or wherever) offices. I am sure two of those lamps are still burning in one of the offices there at the Stadium. And I believe they just put regular kerosene in those lamps to keep the fire burning. So no biggie.

It's amazing how this whole thing is a tempest-in-a-teapot...and why people have a hard time accepting that things change.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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1641537152399ff2cee4eeac561ac072a4386325.jpg

You win an Internet from me, sir.

Seriously, the concept that London has come up with I like, especially with having the teams play a role in the creation of the cauldron.

The EXECUTION is flawed. Was just watching a clip from NBC where you cannot even see the cauldron from the Orbit. So, basically, you want to see the flame? Pony up for the ceremonies or the athletics, otherwise you're better off watching your local television carrier, cause you are not getting any closer.

I hate to say it, but is is rapidly becoming the poorest display of the flame I've seen thus so far and the previous title holder was Albertville. That flame had a half dozen cauldrons scattered around the region and we had at least one flame out at one of the venues, but at least the public could see the darn thing.

The article says they kept the flame burning in a miner's lamp. So at least the 'original' flame is still intact -- assuming that they lit the lamp from one of the petals that the torchbearers lit (and assuming that it was the flame from the torch that ignited the petal and not just a Barcelona-type ignition).

Given these assumptions, I've no problem with the cauldron being extinguished for transfer. Given the cauldron's low height and seemingly fragile structure, I don't think moving it to a spot in the park would be a good idea.

If you want a WTF-what-have-they-done-to-the-flame moment, look no further than Torino 2006. Heck, even the Barcelona cauldron lighting was technically sacrilegious.

They did, they said the flame was transferred from the cauldron to a miner's lamp before the flame was extinguished and the cauldron moved in the article. So, technically, it's still the same flame that lit the cauldron at the OC. That they had to do this in the first place is, along with the visibility of the cauldron, the bone that is sticking my craw at the moment.

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They always keep a miner's lamp, just in case. In 1976, a sudden downpour extinguished the Montreal flame. It was briefly re-lit with a cigarette lighter, then put out again and re-lit with the flame from the miner's lamp.

I also believe that the flame often goes out during the relay - winds, rain, etc. That's why they keep the back-up.

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Ive watched the lighting a few times now, and I have to say I think its the most beautiful lighting of an olympic cauldron ever. The music is fantastic, not dramatic like normal, but beautiful. Barcelona was outstanding and will never be beat in my opinion and Sydney was stunning but had that glitch. London was just beautiful.

As for its location in the stadium, ok its not ideal. But I really think people on here need to put it in perspective. Joe Blogs on the street really does not care if you can see it or not, people are now far more interested in the sport. Ive not heard it mentioned once on any news ive seen and trust me if they can find something to complain about they will!!

People will see it when the athletics start and im sure it will look great in the background behind all those events in a full stadium!

Oh, and I also think the design of this cauldron lends itself to a great extinguishing of the flame at the closing ceremony, which lets face it is often a non-event. How beautiful will it look if the cauldron breaks up and the petals fall to the ground before extinguishing! Far more dramatic than simply going out like other olympics have done.

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well, don't they do this at the end of the Games anyway?? :blink:

Yes. When the Games are OVER.

I love Ceremonies as much as the next person...but guys, rn't u taking this flame-cauldron thing a little too seriously?

I mean, u don't really believe the flame came from Apollo and that Zeus watches over the Games, do u?????????????????? :blink:

No, I don't think that's anyone's complaint.

Could you do the fourth of July without fireworks? Sure, but it's not the same.

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I didn't expect this cauldron to be on a high tower, but I can understand the great disappointment this is to Olympic fans in London.

This is the age of social media, digital cameras, and mobile devices. People connect differently and are more engaged with these kinds of events than ever before.

You can't say "This is for everyone" and then turn around and say "This isn't a tourist attraction" as you lock up and isolate the most vivid symbol of the Olympic games for a whole week.

Yes, the Olympics are about sport. But for the people in London, they are also about the celebration. In Vancouver, people gathered around the cauldron, shared stories, took pictures, and enjoyed a moment together. VANOC was criticized for the fence, but the flame was still very much accessible and a focal point for the people coming to experience Vancouver 2010 - even though much of that wasn't a planned event, but rather the fortunate accident of having a stadium with a roof. I thought London learned something from that experience. Apparently, they thought it better to flashback to 1948.

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I think London's lighting is probably my favorite of all time. LOGOC got everything right with the whole sequence, the music, and the progression. I love Caliban's Dream, probably my favorite original track composed for the Olympics. Sir Redgrave's entrance with 500 park builders cheering as the honor guard was brilliant. I wasn't too sure about the youths lighting the cauldron but London's motto IS "Inspire a Generation". The image of 200+ previous British medalists looking upon them waving and blessing the youth, the hugging embrace from the legends that nominated them, all with that hauntingly beautiful music gave me goosebumps.

It's still very unfortunate that the cauldron cannot be seen outside of the stadium and had to be turned off to move it to another location.

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Ive watched the lighting a few times now, and I have to say I think its the most beautiful lighting of an olympic cauldron ever. The music is fantastic, not dramatic like normal, but beautiful. Barcelona was outstanding and will never be beat in my opinion and Sydney was stunning but had that glitch. London was just beautiful.

As for its location in the stadium, ok its not ideal. But I really think people on here need to put it in perspective. Joe Blogs on the street really does not care if you can see it or not, people are now far more interested in the sport. Ive not heard it mentioned once on any news ive seen and trust me if they can find something to complain about they will!!

People will see it when the athletics start and im sure it will look great in the background behind all those events in a full stadium!

Oh, and I also think the design of this cauldron lends itself to a great extinguishing of the flame at the closing ceremony, which lets face it is often a non-event. How beautiful will it look if the cauldron breaks up and the petals fall to the ground before extinguishing! Far more dramatic than simply going out like other olympics have done.

And just as I read it BBC1 answer the question about what's happened to the flame and the issue of it not being visible outside the stadium. I don't think the cauldron looks that great in it's new position really - and it's worth noting with the athletics finishing around 10pm most night that it'll only really be seen in daylight.

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They should've done the douse and relight of the flame a little more formally...Still at least it is now where it should be. (I still laugh at the 1976 Bic relight!)

It's sad that controversy of this most potent symbol of the Olympic Games (since 1936 anyway-thank you Hitler) has really hurt what was suppose to be the premium sports event.

The Cauldron is truly magical...It's just a shame LOCOG has mis-read the global feelings about the flame, and Sebastion Coe's uttlerly offensive comments simply reminds me of typical Class Society attitude that still reeks in the UK!

In the era of multi-media and camera's on every corner...You'd think that the Cauldron could be projected onto big screens outside.

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I'm not too disappointed by the fact that the cauldron isn't visible to the public in the Olympic Park. That is a recent trend and is very difficult to pull off if you have a fully-enclosed Olympic Stadium.

What I'm disappointed about is they couldn't figure out a way to either (1) light the cauldron in its permanent position, so that it didn't have to be temporarily extinguished in order to accommodate the athletics competition; or (2) move the cauldron from its lighting position to its permanent position during the opening ceremony.

I can't image it would have been that difficult or costly to move Betty from the center of the infield to her current position, using tracks, after it was lit. (Surely the 8.5-meter tall "stems" could contain enough fuel to last long enough to do that.)

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In hindsight, the ideas thrown around of London building a large tower, having multiple cauldrons, or whatever else was suggested before the 27th seem really unrealistic now.

Clearly, London's budget was tight. Very tight.

Tight enough to force them into the corner of only being able to build a small cauldron. Coupled with a very closed stadium roof structure and they were stuck with a small cauldron than can't be placed in a position visible from both the inside and the outside of the stadium. So they had to choose and they chose the inside probably simply because that's where the ceremony takes place.

All very unfortunate, but in retrospect, not the most surprising move from London.n

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My son and myself have enjoyed reading the speculation about the cauldron and just wanted to add our humble, newbie opinion to this thread.

We visited the Olympic Park yesterday as we had grabbed some last minute tickets for the basketball and a trip up the Orbit.

For us, it was the only thing that didn't feel right about the park. Not being able to see the iconic flame from around the park was a the only let-down for our short trip. We did manage to catch a view of it from the top of the Orbit.

From the view that shows the roof of the stadium, the flame is also projected onto the screen, but why, we were not sure. We only noticed this later on photos not when we were actually at the event.

olympics-084-size.jpg

olympics-083-size.jpg

...now as for Lord Coe!!!

How can he say this is not a tourist attraction. The Olympics are in themselves a tourist attraction. An event or location that attracts visitors!

If he does't think it is a tourist attraction why are they selling thousands of souvenirs in shops all over London and the Olympic venues. What a load of nonsense.

And can anybody tell me when it was ever "green" to burn thousands of pounds worth of gas, when nobody can even get any benefit from the flame. Typical environmental hogwash!!!

We spoke to several members of staff about the flame and they all said that lots of people had been asking why it could not be seen.

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In hindsight, the ideas thrown around of London building a large tower, having multiple cauldrons, or whatever else was suggested before the 27th seem really unrealistic now.

Clearly, London's budget was tight. Very tight.

Tight enough to force them into the corner of only being able to build a small cauldron. Coupled with a very closed stadium roof structure and they were stuck with a small cauldron than can't be placed in a position visible from both the inside and the outside of the stadium. So they had to choose and they chose the inside probably simply because that's where the ceremony takes place.

All very unfortunate, but in retrospect, not the most surprising move from London.n

Vancouver's secondary permanent outdoor cauldron wasn't an expense of VANOC, rather it was built and donated by the local natural gas company at a cost of $5-million. Maybe LOCOG could have done something creatively or cut back elsewhere...

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Vancouver's secondary permanent outdoor cauldron wasn't an expense of VANOC, rather it was built and donated by the local natural gas company at a cost of $5-million. Maybe LOCOG could have done something creatively or cut back elsewhere...

I think I read somewhere that London couldn't secure a corporate sponsor for an external cauldron. Still, $5 million would seem like a trivial expense in the scheme of things.

My son and myself have enjoyed reading the speculation about the cauldron and just wanted to add our humble, newbie opinion to this thread.

We visited the Olympic Park yesterday as we had grabbed some last minute tickets for the basketball and a trip up the Orbit.

For us, it was the only thing that didn't feel right about the park. Not being able to see the iconic flame from around the park was a the only let-down for our short trip. We did manage to catch a view of it from the top of the Orbit.

From the view that shows the roof of the stadium, the flame is also projected onto the screen, but why, we were not sure. We only noticed this later on photos not when we were actually at the event.

olympics-084-size.jpg

olympics-083-size.jpg

...now as for Lord Coe!!!

How can he say this is not a tourist attraction. The Olympics are in themselves a tourist attraction. An event or location that attracts visitors!

If he does't think it is a tourist attraction why are they selling thousands of souvenirs in shops all over London and the Olympic venues. What a load of nonsense.

And can anybody tell me when it was ever "green" to burn thousands of pounds worth of gas, when nobody can even get any benefit from the flame. Typical environmental hogwash!!!

We spoke to several members of staff about the flame and they all said that lots of people had been asking why it could not be seen.

Amazing pictures; thanks. It appears that if you went back today, you wouldn't have been able to see the flame from the top of the Orbit. Shame!

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It's sad that controversy of this most potent symbol of the Olympic Games .

It's the 5 rings. And there are enuf of those giant ones around London for photo opps. And people will have nuf shots of them in the various venues to show their grandchildren or whenever London IV will come around.

What London's probably made a mistake on is not having mini-scale-models of the cauldron to sell. It would make a nice marshmallow-holder centerpiece. :lol:

OK, here;s where Heatherwick copied his cauldron:

2011-01-06-11-39-05-9-the-flower-like-fountain-is-a-symbol-of-top-touris.jpeg

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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