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London 2012 Olympic Cauldron...


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OK...I'll try...

Summer:

84 - Rafer Johnson

88 - Three Korean youths representing sport, art and academics

92 - Rebollo (sp?), the Paralympic archer

96 - Ali

00 - Cathy Freeman

04 - Kakalmanakis (sp???), Greek sailing gold medalist

08 - Li, the gymnast

Winter:

84 - A girl...figure skater, think she competed at those games

88 - Robyn Perry, a future Olympian (well, she was called that at the time)

92 - Platini (sp?) and a little boy

94 - The Crown Prince of Norway

98 - Midori Ito

02 - The Miracle on Ice team

06 - Ummm, that Italian skier girl who won all those medals

10 - Gretzky, Nash, Green, and Lamay-Doane

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Considering it's been a couple of decades since any country has pulled the youth card in lighting the flame I think it was absolutely the right choice for London - though considering the cauldron design they could easily have had those who nominated them join them as well.

Sydney did it much better......final torch relay completed by famous athletes...who would inspire young Australians to become Olympians.....cauldron lit by an Aborigine who would inspire.....

The final stages of the Sydney lighting though completely excluded half the population with their sexist selection policy. :rolleyes:

I just read this online...

"The Cauldron will be moved to take pride of place in the Olympic Stadium within the eyeline of competing athletes - echoes of its location at Wembley for the London 1948 Games.

At the end of the Games, each team will take their petal home and the London 2012 Cauldron will cease to exist. Like a flower that only blooms for the during the competition, it's a temporary representation of the extraordinary transitory community that is the Olympic Games. "

I can imagine some of these pieces ending up in a back alley like the cauldron from Moscow <_<

A real shame as it's a cauldron design which would make a fantastic permanent monument to the games - much better than the bloody Orbit.

BBC's James Pearce confirms Cauldron will be moved to the current location of the bell. He speculates this may be unpopular, as it will not be visible in the park and will essentially be behind closed doors for the first week.

I thought that might be the case - if it's going where the bell is (and what was the point in that bell) it makes it more annoying it wasn't in it's final position for the lighting - no reason why it couldn't have been really. A shame though it won't be visible throughout the Olympic Park.

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i agreed too....even though it looks nice, the cauldron should always rise above the stadium..... it loses the Olympic magic when it can not be seen glittering about the Olympic Park Skyline.

But there were some occasions where the cauldron was sited inside the stadium. They happened in 1948, 1976 and 1988. I have no feelings about where exactly they should put it, that's a matter for the stadium and the games organisers. I admitted I myself was surprised they didn't stick to the original plans, not disappointed but just curiously surprised. I'm sure they have their reasons, and I'm not fussed either way.

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Sydney did it much better......final torch relay completed by famous athletes...who would inspire young Australians to become Olympians.....cauldron lit by an Aborigine who would inspire.....

Tina Arena sang a song in tribute to the flame, Vanessa Amarosi sang in tribute to the heroes of the Olympic Games, John Farham and Olivia Newton John sang in tribute to the Athletes, and Nicki Webster invited the world in unity with "Under the Southern Sky"

if London wanted the Opening ceremony to be compared to Sydney's (which was Danny Boyle's aim) he didn't seem to do that very well....

none of the songs were written specially for the opening, from a country with a "strong music industry"

:(:unsure::wacko:

Nevertheless it was better than Sydney's

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... especially as we were all expecting one of the tallest cauldrons ever.

They could have hidden the tower underground, and maybe they could have make it to go up automatically on opening ceremony day. I don't think it's really that impossible to do so. But then I suppose at the end of the day, politics and money wins the day. Either way it's interesting - different methods of lighting, different stadiums, different looks of cauldrons. This world would be boring if the same method of lighting and the same cauldron was used at every games.

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An hour or so ago, they reported on ZDF that they are receiving many critical questions of viewers where the cauldron will go and why it isn't visible from the outside this time. They also said that those issues were the topic of a news conference a short while ago.

Apparently, it was the news conference the Press Association is reporting about now - so far, they quote Thomas Heatherwick as follows:

Thomas Heatherwick, the creator of the cauldron, said he had not wanted to try to make it bigger and taller than those at previous Games.

Heatherwick told a news conference: "We were aware cauldrons had been getting bigger, higher, fatter as each Olympics happened and we felt we shouldn't try to be even bigger than the last ones.

"This incredible event has 204 nations coming together, so we had a child from each country bringing these copper polished objects in.

"At the end of the Games this cauldron will dismantle itself and radiate back down to the ground and each of those copper pieces taken away by each nation and put in a national Olympic cabinet somewhere."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/jul/28/london-2012-olympic-cauldron-petals?newsfeed=true

So no official word yet why they chose to keep the cauldron "indoors".

This is a major letdown of these Games, though. Somehow it's not the same when there's not a flame towering over the stadium or the Olympic Park. Sochi, Rio, Pyeongchang: Listen and learn! But since Sochi will use a very open stadium, Pyeongchang will use a ski-jumping facility and since Rio's renovated Maracana will probably have a roof strong enough to carry a heavy cauldron, I don't expect an "indoor" cauldron happening so soon again.

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This is a major letdown of these Games, though. Somehow it's not the same when there's not a flame towering over the stadium or the Olympic Park. Sochi, Rio, Pyeongchang: Listen and learn! But since Sochi will use a very open stadium, Pyeongchang will use a ski-jumping facility and since Rio's renovated Maracana will probably have a roof strong enough to carry a heavy cauldron, I don't expect an "indoor" cauldron happening so soon again.

PyeongChang changed the OC venue - it will not be at Ski Jump

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...So...Is the cauldron staying where it is? In the middle?...

By the way, I do like the cauldron...Its good to see the oneupmanship of previous events being ended. Got a feeling the IOC is happy about that.

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So indeed every nation has its individual petal, due to the inscriptions - and therefore will probably get exactly that petal back after the Games. Nice!

Kinda 'borrowed' the idea from Atlanta96's gesture in Greece when before the flame was flown to the States, the previous 16 or 17 Summer host cities (London, of course, included) were invited to send reps to Olympia and each take home a miner's lamp containing the 'Centennial' flame. By a pre-arranged calendar, each city celebrated "Olympic Day" before culminating in the start of the 1996 relay at the LA Memorial Coliseum. That whole arrangement was rather clever but didn't get too much publicity.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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well, first of all - I think it is a pitty that the Olympic Flame isn't visible outside of the stadium, but what I really like on the idea of the London cauldron that it is formed by 204 sticks, which were brought into the stadium by the participating team. I think it is a marvellous idea and shows a great sportmanship that the spirit of London will be brought in the countries of all participating teams...

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They just showed the cauldron on the news. It is still in the centre of the stadium at the moment but the flame is turned down quite considerably but still lit.

It looks like it's in the middle of a scrap yard at the minute. I do think it's a real shame - the cauldron is part of the whole games, not just the ceremonies, so should be visible throughout. In past Olympics it's always been the default shot for any broadcaster.

Looking forward Sochi's should be integrated into the stadium, though I believe plans have changed. But with the Rio ceremonies not being in the main track stadium I fear we'll either have another temporary cauldron or a cauldron in a stadium which only hosts football.

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Well, Rio has now an excuse to make an indoor cauldron in 4 years. Though many people will not be pleased. I mean, the cauldron is supossed to be seen everywhere by the public. It's kinda stupid that you have to pay a ticket to see it. Not only that, but people in London won't be even able to see it after the games because it will be dismantled.

However, I did liked the design of the cauldron and the lightning method which was used. The fact that athletes nominated kids to light the cauldron fits with the "Inspire a Generation" slogan. Also i'm glad it will be moved to the place on which the bell is hanging (reminiscing of 1948's cauldron)

Also, those tickets were spoiling us all the time along :lol:

It looks like it's in the middle of a scrap yard at the minute. I do think it's a real shame - the cauldron is part of the whole games, not just the ceremonies, so should be visible throughout. In past Olympics it's always been the default shot for any broadcaster.

Looking forward Sochi's should be integrated into the stadium, though I believe plans have changed. But with the Rio ceremonies not being in the main track stadium I fear we'll either have another temporary cauldron or a cauldron in a stadium which only hosts football.

Or maybe they install a replica of the cauldron at the athletics stadium, like Guadalajara did last year.

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well, first of all - I think it is a pitty that the Olympic Flame isn't visible outside of the stadium, but what I really like on the idea of the London cauldron that it is formed by 204 sticks, which were brought into the stadium by the participating team. I think it is a marvellous idea and shows a great sportmanship that the spirit of London will be brought in the countries of all participating teams...

The idea is fantastic, both in terms of the petals representing each nation and how they had youngsters nominated by Olympic legends light it - but no use having a gorgeous cauldron with such a great idea behind it if nobody can see it.

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The idea is fantastic, both in terms of the petals representing each nation and how they had youngsters nominated by Olympic legends light it - but no use having a gorgeous cauldron with such a great idea behind it if nobody can see it.

What r u talking about? 4 billion saw it last night. Not all 4 billion are going to London; so what's the point of insisting that it sit 'outside'? It's not necessary.

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Design of London Olympic cauldron a well-kept secret

By Kevin Johnson, USA TODAY

The very first instruction to designers of London's Olympic cauldron was a blunt directive: no moving parts.

What resulted was an elaborate creation involving 204 moving pieces, each representing the coming together of the competing countries.

Two years in the making, creator Thomas Heatherwick said Saturday that test runs were done in secret in the north of England before the assembly was brought to the stadium and discreetly tested this week — but only after airspace restrictions prevented news helicopters from getting an advance look.

"It's great to have an opportunity to talk about this big secret we've been keeping for more than two years," Heatherwick said, looking bleary-eyed after Friday night's dramatic unveiling. "It did seem to work last night, which was a huge relief.''

Heatherwick said the design sought to project a world unified by sport.

Petal-shaped heat elements made from hammered copper were created for each country and then carried into the stadium by children during the parade of countries.

The "petals,'' each fitted with an igniter, were then whisked to the cauldron assembly area beneath the stadium floor where they were attached to stainless steel rods in preparation for lighting.

The packed stadium got its first look at the creation with the rods and petals arrayed on the ground in 10 rings, just as the torch arrived in a closely timed relay, starting on The River Thames.

From the time the torch was placed on the first petal, it took 45 seconds for each copper element to ignite, prompting the cauldron to rise from the ground, ultimately drawing each of the petals together at a height of about 28 feet.

"The essence of the Olympics is this raw thing, which is the flame,'' Heatherwick said.

In the end, the cauldron performed exactly as it did during the pre-dawn rehearsal, attended by just five people to ensure that the design remained a secret.

There was so much interest in the design, Heatherwick said, that local gambling houses were taking bets on whether it would be revealed before the ceremony.

"No bookie paid off,'' he said.

In addition, the Guardian newspaper reported Saturday that local gambling houses pledged to refund bets on who would light the cauldron. Normally, one person significant to the host country does the honor. This time, with the unique design, seven youngsters held torches to light it simultaneously, something no one could have predicted.

Unlike other recent Olympic host cities, which have traditionally displayed the flame atop the main stadium, Heatherwick said the London cauldron will remain inside the stadium in keeping with the 1948 London Olympic games.

"We wanted to keep it sitting with the spectators,'' Heatherwick said, adding that the public outside the stadium will be able to view it on video screens scattered throughout Olympic Park.

When the flame is extinguished, Heatherwick said the cauldron will be completely disassembled and each country will be provided with a scorched petal to carry home.

"Everyone has a piece in the end,'' he said.

http://www.usatoday....lame/56554566/1

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What r u talking about? 4 billion saw it last night. Not all 4 billion are going to London; so what's the point of insisting that it sit 'outside'? It's not necessary.

Because the cauldron is a symbol of the games, not just the climax of the ceremony. It's also not about it being on TV - the Olympics are in town and Londoners, visitors and athletes should be able to see the Olympic flame burning bright.

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