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London 2012 Olympic Cauldron...


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Hello all....

A Newbie here! I have really enjoyed reading all the posts. I am excited about all the pre-Olympics buzz.

After looking at some of the posts and photos.... I agree that the cauldron will be something that is portable and will be inside the stadium during the ceremony and moved afterwards. I also think, that since we have seen pictures of the giant tree lifting from its base in the stadium, the cauldron could lift from inside the big hill where the tree sits.

Earlier arguments suggested that placing it there would be a safety concern for the spectators and too close to the stadium.... again lets not forget the Sydney cauldron that can really close to viewers as it rose to the top of the stadium. The flame was not fully turned on high until it reached the top.

or

Could the tree be used to lift the person lighting the cauldron on top of the stadium?

If the cauldron will appear on top of the stadium, with only 20 days left, why are there still nog signs of it?

When did they start the cauldron building in Bejijg? Since I was one week before the Games in Beijing and I followed the building here at that time it was I think at least two weeks before the Games. Maybe more?

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What exactly has been the point of the last 160 pages, then? When did we cross the line into throwing away anything, potentially legitamate, anyone brings up in this thread simply because "it won't ma

The longer I see it "in action", I think that the idea behind the cauldron lighting and the design was extremely clever - but Heatherwick and Company completely failed in realising that the cauldron w

I don't quite understand your reasoning that the 2012 location is showing more people worldwide the cauldron that had it been located elsewhere (ie roofline of stadium etc). The cauldron is always a f

The cauldron construction in Beijing started in late May 2008, with more than two months to go. So no, there will most probably not be any cauldron on top of the stadium, especially not since the roof is carefully balanced and therefore probably can't bear such an additional weight.

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On an unrelated note - does anybody know what has happened to the support/podium of Sydney's Olympic cauldron? The fountain at Olympic Park only features the dish, with awkward sticks supporting it that were not part of the original design. Where is the original tower that rose up at the ceremony to support it? I always thought that it almost looked like an ode to Melbourne's Olympic cauldron.

I emailed the Sydney Olympic Park Authority about this a number of years ago. They told me that it was discarded as it was not considered an important part of the cauldron. I couldn't believe it!! I do like the cauldron/waterfall as it is today but there was something about its original form and the stand that was so special. Although most people think of the Sydney cauldron being quite modern and futuristic/sci-fi, I think it had a respectable "classic" look about it that many cauldron designs lack. Yes, it definitely paid homage to Melbourne 1956 while still unique in itself.

Incidentally, the designer of the cauldron reconfiguration was murdered in his home a few years ago: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/landscaper-killed-over-lucrative-fountain-deals-court-told-20120207-1r5g0.html

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I emailed the Sydney Olympic Park Authority about this a number of years ago. They told me that it was discarded as it was not considered an important part of the cauldron. I couldn't believe it!! I do like the cauldron/waterfall as it is today but there was something about its original form and the stand that was so special. Although most people think of the Sydney cauldron being quite modern and futuristic/sci-fi, I think it had a respectable "classic" look about it that many cauldron designs lack. Yes, it definitely paid homage to Melbourne 1956 while still unique in itself.

Incidentally, the designer of the cauldron reconfiguration was murdered in his home a few years ago: http://www.smh.com.a...0207-1r5g0.html

This is immensely disappointing, Re; cauldron. I wonder who's decision it was to make such an irrational call with our history?! Heck, we even have Melbourne's Olympic Cauldron completely in one piece after nearly 60 years and can't manage Sydney's after barely a year. It was an integral part of the design - and as you rightfully point out - made it one of the most "classical" Olympic cauldrons in recent decades. It's entrance at the Opening Ceremony was brash and bold, but for the rest of the event it sat quite subtly, without demanding too much attention, whilst still making a sharp statement.

22ttnws2.gif

And today, sans the "non important' base:

carousel-main-image.jpg

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This is immensely disappointing, Re; cauldron. I wonder who's decision it was to make such an irrational call with our history?! Heck, we even have Melbourne's Olympic Cauldron completely in one piece after nearly 60 years and can't manage Sydney's after barely a year. It was an integral part of the design - and as you rightfully point out - made it one of the most "classical" Olympic cauldrons in recent decades. It's entrance at the Opening Ceremony was brash and bold, but for the rest of the event it sat quite subtly, without demanding too much attention, whilst still making a sharp statement.

Playing a bit of devil's advocate here, but maybe they wanted the public to be able to experience the most unique aspect of the Syndey cauldron: the fact that it has a open core. You can stand under it now and see through it and, if lit, see the flames from underneath. As water is cascading around you, you are basically reenacting the moment when Cathy Freeman lit the cauldron, and it rose above and around her with the water cascading down. This is, to me, one of the best moments in Olympic ceremony history and the way this is set up lets one relive it personally.

402609-sydney-olympic-cauldron-cathy-freeman.jpg

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Yes, seriously. :P It's called "Olympic Games City".

oh my !!! i'm knocked out to hear this... i'm shocked!!!!! but with 19 days left we can't throwing out jokes when we still know less about the actual cauldron so please no jokes not at this time.....
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Some people here are seriously overreacting. Is the pressure of not knowing where the cauldron is so heavy for you? Relax a little, especially when it comes to such very obvious jokes like this one.

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Looking back at preview images during the stadium building I found out this.

evidence1.png

Here we can see other white retangular area between the bridges.

possiblecauldronsite.png

Hiroamorim, I think it has been speculated and concluded that those are markers for septic tanks or sewage depots of the stadium. Look at the early stage of construction, that is more like a SEPTIC TANK than anything else. And why are there 2? The lower one especially, (in the 2nd foto), is too far from the stadium to be of any use as a cauldron base.

And the solid land around there is too thin and practically non-existent to support the base of at least a 120-ft. high tower.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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I have to agree London has been one of the most sucessful hosts when it comes to hide the cauldron. They did it so well we don't have much clues of it's location. Which makes it more entertaining. I bet the cauldron will probably end up appearing in the least imagined place. :lol:

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I have to agree London has been one of the most sucessful hosts when it comes to hide the cauldron. They did it so well we don't have much clues of it's location. Which makes it more entertaining. I bet the cauldron will probably end up appearing in the least imagined place. :lol:

LOL maybe in the end it will be a mini cauldron rolled out from backstage. That way they can hide it from anyone right until the moment it's lit!

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I have to agree London has been one of the most sucessful hosts when it comes to hide the cauldron. They did it so well we don't have much clues of it's location. Which makes it more entertaining. I bet the cauldron will probably end up appearing in the least imagined place. :lol:

What's the least imagined place until now? B)

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Redgrave and Bannister carried the flame today (although Bannister handed it to the first torch bearer and thus was not an official torch bearer). Does that mean they are out for the lighting?

NO !!!! Most of (if not all) final torch bearers have been a normal torch bearer in the weeks leading to the Opening Ceremony...

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Cathy Freeman did, though, didn't she?

But Eddie the Eagle was 'snubbed' so I think it will be him, doing a tribute to Lillehammer 1994 and ski jumping off the Orbit, bouncing off the fabric roof and into the cauldron. ;)

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Well, Ben Ainslie is NOT exactly the most well-known UK athlete; so I doubt it'd be him. I think the oldest living medallist from 1948 would have the most resonance, assisted say by Tom Daley.

Don't forget Midori Ito back in 1998. She was the first and the last torchbearer in Nagano.

R u sure? I thought that was an Audio-Animatronic figure from Disneyland-Tokyo up there.

She was so boring.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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