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London 2012 Olympic Cauldron...


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I doubt they'll have London or LOCOG VIPs presenting all petals to all 204 nations in such solemn ceremonies. But even if they will, I think it would be a nice gesture - and why should they not stretch the moment? Before we head into another boring non-Olympic year, it's good to see some "London Olympic memorial ceremonies" before this Olympic year is over.

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What exactly has been the point of the last 160 pages, then? When did we cross the line into throwing away anything, potentially legitamate, anyone brings up in this thread simply because "it won't ma

The longer I see it "in action", I think that the idea behind the cauldron lighting and the design was extremely clever - but Heatherwick and Company completely failed in realising that the cauldron w

I don't quite understand your reasoning that the 2012 location is showing more people worldwide the cauldron that had it been located elsewhere (ie roofline of stadium etc). The cauldron is always a f

  • 3 weeks later...

Seems like the petals are wrapped around a burner still as they are returned. Is there an intention that the petals could be reconnected to a gas line and re-ignited later? If so, it's a cool idea that all the nations who were in London will have their own personal Olympic flame to light when an Olympics comes around again.

And I for one disagree with 2013 being a "boring" year. Do not forget about the vote in July for 2020.

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You mean in September. The 2020 host city election takes place on September 7. Three days later, on September 10, the IOC will elect its new President.

Well, OK -- 2013 will certainly be a meaningful year for the Olympic Movement as well, but neither the race for the 2020 Games nor for the IOC Presidency is exactly exciting. 2020 has three only fairly exciting candidate cities of which Tokyo should be the clear favourite (and Madrid's bid is a joke like Annecy's 2018 bid) and Thomas Bach seems to be the clear favourite in the race for the IOC Presidency.

Additionally, I always prefer the Olympic years over the non-Olympic years - they offer far more anticipation and excitement, sports instead of sports politics, and not to forget: exciting ceremonies.

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All the petals have been given to the delegations now, so there's only really the base and stems left. I would assume it's probably in storage somewhere? Can't imagine they would just destroy it but it's not anything attractive to display on its own.

Discovered this picture of the cauldron hiding under the stadium floor waiting for it's petals to be attached

1_bond_gadget_extraordinaire_o1lykwxx.jp

I still think it's amazing how well LOCOG managed to keep it a secret, especially in this day and age when everything leaks out eventually!

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I wonder if replica petals will be produced for the sake of preserving the cauldron, perhaps so it can go on display in a museum? I must admit I would love to see it in person one day, in a similar form to during the 2012 Olympics.

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I remember Heatherwick saying the cauldron would be more of a moment than a monument, as it was meant to be dismantled forever after the games closing as a symbol of the ephemeral olympic gathering.

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I remember Heatherwick saying the cauldron would be more of a moment than a monument, as it was meant to be dismantled forever after the games closing as a symbol of the ephemeral olympic gathering.

Yeah yeah, I remember that. :lol: I was just hoping the "moment" could be bottled up and kept, even if it slightly dented Heatherwicks authenticity.

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That music sure sounded like it was a track of LES MISERABLES!

So what have they done with the remains of the cauldron now??

Dances with Wolves actually. John Barry was English, but I still think it was kind of an odd choice.

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Dances with Wolves actually. John Barry was English, but I still think it was kind of an odd choice.

No, the music from "Dances with Wolves" was only used when the cauldron was extinguished. The piece used for opening up the cauldron (as could be heard in mjb's clip above) was a piece called "Extinguishing The Flame" performed by the London Symphony Orchestra. It's also on CD 2 of the official closing ceremony album:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Symphony-Of-British-Music-Ceremony/dp/B008U7JREK

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...might as well fire up this thread since we are drifting towards Cauldron talk again. I'm moving the following post here to it's proper home.

I agree that the cauldron could have been spectacular, the
multiple head idea and coming together had HIGH potential, and unfortunately it
just fell flat. As a creative professional it is particularly disappointing me when

opportunities such as this are not fully realized. I blame the designer and the director. And

I still feel something went horribly wrong in the cauldrons design process that
resulted in the fixture they ended up with, parts of it looked more like a
prototype than a final version.

olympic-torch-3_2292743b.jpg

olympics-083-size.jpg

article-2181002-1449B726000005DC-10_634x

7711976678_6947279a5f_z.jpg

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I thot it was good, considering it was a bunch of 204 giant matchsticks thrown together,and something that was meant to be ephemeral; not to last. (And then adapted to 160+ for lympics, Part 2, the Paras.) The base is lying somewhere in some warehouse, if it hasn't already been dismantled for scrap. But I can't weep if that was the original vision. It just lives on in memories and fotos.

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...might as well fire up this thread since we are drifting towards Cauldron talk again. I'm moving the following post here to it's proper home.

I agree that the cauldron could have been spectacular, the

multiple head idea and coming together had HIGH potential, and unfortunately it

just fell flat. As a creative professional it is particularly disappointing me when

opportunities such as this are not fully realized. I blame the designer and the director. And

I still feel something went horribly wrong in the cauldrons design process that

resulted in the fixture they ended up with, parts of it looked more like a

prototype than a final version.

olympic-torch-3_2292743b.jpg

olympics-083-size.jpg

article-2181002-1449B726000005DC-10_634x

7711976678_6947279a5f_z.jpg

Totally agree.

Underwhelming.

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I liked it. It was different; and was hard to guess. It was like a birthday cake. Present and lit for the occasion. You eat it; digest it and only the memory and pictures remain. It was LOCOG's choice that they have no permanent reminder of it, so they have to live with that.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Even if I repeat myself: But the cauldron's main design was brilliant, original and impressive, even if it was a comparably small cauldron. But it had deep meaning and the idea behind it was very clever on several levels:

1) Letting the participating countries "contribute" to the cauldron and then take their "contribution" back home as souvenir,

2) symbolising the coming together of the world

3) the message that many small flames can create together a big warming fire and shining light for the whole globe,

4) making it a blossom that blooms for the duration of the Games and then wilts and de-composes into its pieces at the end of the Games

The ill conception about it, though, was that Heatherwick and LOCOG respectively the ceremonial team apparently underestimated (or never really cared about) how important for Olympic tourists and the cameras of the world it is that the cauldron sits on top of the stadium or even outside it, with the flame burning for everyone to see (and to take pictures ;)). The other slight ill conception was that they had to move the cauldron and therefore extinguish and relight it.

One might call it also an ill conception that there won't be an Olympic cauldron on display in London's Olympic Park. But the more I think about it, I like the idea of having a temporary cauldron that remains only a memory after the Games. It's, as I stated above, a great and even rather philosophical idea. And the great Olympic Park and all the other still used venues are probably a much, much better souvenir of those Games than a mostly defunct cauldron could have ever been.

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I liked the cauldron as a sculptural concept -- just not as a cauldron.

I'm repeating myself too but... having the cauldron so small, making it invisible to spectators for the first week of the Games, intentionally extinguishing it and relighting it, tucking it in a corner where it looked all but forgotten -- these were failures of design.

The symbolism of the petals, their entrance into the stadium, and the animated opening and closing of the cauldron do not come anywhere close to compensating for other significant shortcomings of the design. At least, not in my opinion.

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The ill conception about it, though, was that Heatherwick and LOCOG respectively the ceremonial team apparently underestimated (or never really cared about) how important for Olympic tourists and the cameras of the world it is that the cauldron sits on top of the stadium or even outside it, with the flame burning for everyone to see (and to take pictures ;)). The other slight ill conception was that they had to move the cauldron and therefore extinguish and relight it.

I think the re-lighting, relocation episode upset only the Olympic nerds. I mean everybody was supposed to forget what was going on behind-the-scenes and focus on the sporting events already going on in those first few days. People are really TOO nosey. I mean if this had been held in Beijing, there would've been a NEWS BLACKOUT on any tinkering with the cauldron!! ;)

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I think the re-lighting, relocation episode upset only the Olympic nerds. I mean everybody was supposed to forget what was going on behind-the-scenes and focus on the sporting events already going on in those first few days. People are really TOO nosey. I mean if this had been held in Beijing, there would've been a NEWS BLACKOUT on any tinkering with the cauldron!! ;)

I do tend to be a defender of the cauldron, and the London OC in general, but the location and the week's blackout of the cauldron was IMO, one of the shortcomings. I don't think it was just Olympic nerds upset by it - it should have been obvious that one of the big photo-ops anybody visiting a games wants is a pic of that cauldron and to see it burning over the park. Hiding it away, for whatever justification, was just a huge misjudgement IMO.

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The cauldrons shifty whereabouts and the fact that London
decided it was OK to just blow it out so it could migrate to the hallway
appeared on most national new here in the US, so I think it was a bit more
mainstream news than just amongst us Olympic dorks.

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Very true, Paul. And the pictures of Austin Playfoot relighting the cauldron (I won't mention the infamous cherry picker he did that from ;)) made rounds, too.

Maybe only or almost only Olympic nerds were really upset by it - but it was at least a topic also outside our circles. The question "Where will the cauldron go?" was quite an important topic on the day after the opening ceremony here on German TV, for example.

And just for the record: It didn't really upset myself - since we've seen or read worse already (remember the cigarette lighter used for relighting the cauldron in Montreal or the absolutely fake pyrotechnic "lighting" of the cauldron in Torino). At least they used the original flame in both cases (in the opening ceremony and later at the little cherry picker ceremony) in London and unlike Montreal and Athens (where the flame was blown out in the night after the opening ceremony), they at least behaved transparently and showed to the public how the cauldron was relit. I just mentioned that story because it created controversial reactions among quite a few other people.

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Athens (where the flame was blown out in the night after the opening ceremony),.

Didn't know that. But then again, ATHOC must've presumed that since the flame came from some 300km away, no precautions were to be taken. ("That's the Mediterranean way of doing things...") What if the reefer fulcrum wasn't working a la Sydney and refused to bend down again? I wonder how they would've relit that thing? Shoot an arrow? :lol:

Latter thought on London's. I think when Heatherwick conceived it and the IOC, LOCOG and Ceremonies signed off on it, the die was cast. It had to be a stadium-floor piece and non-T&F spectators just had to resign themselves to NO cauldron foto opp. The cauldron & lighting would NOT have played out its full visual impact if it had been placed on the roof of the stadium or outside. As I made allusion to earlier, it was like a birthday cake w/ moving candles...so it had to be in the center of the room; and it wouldn't have looked great on the roof or at some higher plane.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Latter thought on London's. I think when Heatherwick conceived it and the IOC, LOCOG and Ceremonies signed off on it, the die was cast. It had to be a stadium-floor piece and non-T&F spectators just had to resign themselves to NO cauldron foto opp. The cauldron & lighting would NOT have played out its full visual impact if it had been placed on the roof of the stadium or outside. As I made allusion to earlier, it was like a birthday cake w/ moving candles...so it had to be in the center of the room; and it wouldn't have looked great on the roof or at some higher plane.

Additionally, the cauldron would have lost a big part of its symbolism. It was positioned deliberately right in the centre of all those athletes from 205 nations - so that the 205 petals could rise from the people who sort of had "contributed" them to the cauldron and that the symbolism of all nations uniting to respectively around one flame could be stressed even further.

Also the visual impact for the audience (and not only for the TV cameras) would have been less intense if those 205 little flames hadn't risen apparently from out of nowhere, without any support, from within the infield, but could have been seen only from below, on the roof or on some other prominent high structure. See this video in order to understand the visual effect I mean:

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