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London 2012 Olympic Cauldron...


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What exactly has been the point of the last 160 pages, then? When did we cross the line into throwing away anything, potentially legitamate, anyone brings up in this thread simply because "it won't ma

The longer I see it "in action", I think that the idea behind the cauldron lighting and the design was extremely clever - but Heatherwick and Company completely failed in realising that the cauldron w

I don't quite understand your reasoning that the 2012 location is showing more people worldwide the cauldron that had it been located elsewhere (ie roofline of stadium etc). The cauldron is always a f

Well, nobody else has done so before or since.

Maybe there's a reason? :wacko:

And i think we have to be honest here and state that the London cauldron lighting was the most anti climatic probably since the seventies

The lighting in July was just so-so. The theatre lighting was bad; the green outfits were underwhelming. And I hate it when there are more than TWO lighters. OK, 2, 3, 4, a dozen have lit. What number hasn't been tried? Seven sounds good. Let's try seven. And this nominating newer, younger kids was OK; but so what? What have they done to earn it? I mean, for all u know 1 or 2 of those could become drug junkies next year.

Well, the cauldron was the star--not the lighters.

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Maybe there's a reason? :wacko:

You mean just like there's a reason why nobody besides Barcelona attempted a flaming arrow?

Well, the cauldron was the star--not the lighters.

For all of ten minutes. Then it was hustled off stage where it waited for a week. It then crept into a corner of the stadium where it lurked like a bashful supernumerary until it got another five minutes of limelight shortly before it was extinguished (for the second time).

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You mean just like there's a reason why nobody besides Barcelona attempted a flaming arrow?

No; because the idea of a 'bending stick-cauldron' is just so corny; so unexciting; so primitive in cauldron-lighting evolution that the pros would not even have considered it. I mean, who thought it up? An architect because he had hemmed in all the free space with his overwhleming roof.

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And i think we have to be honest here and state that the London cauldron lighting was the most anti climatic probably since the seventies

Oooh, look at you using the Royal "we"

Edited by RobH
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And who is she/they? Never heard of them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_and_the_Machine

It's an indie rock band that is pretty big currently here in Europe and especially in the UK. Some people here guessed before the London Games whether Florence and the Machine would perform at the opening and/or closing ceremony. But as we know now, they didn't - and that was quite a surprise, just like the non-inclusion of Adele who is probably the biggest international music star from Britain currently.

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http://en.wikipedia....and_the_Machine

It's an indie rock band that is pretty big currently here in Europe and especially in the UK. Some people here guessed before the London Games whether Florence and the Machine would perform at the opening and/or closing ceremony. But as we know now, they didn't - and that was quite a surprise, just like the non-inclusion of Adele who is probably the biggest international music star from Britain currently.

The absence of Elton John was noticed too.

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No; because the idea of a 'bending stick-cauldron' is just so corny; so unexciting; so primitive in cauldron-lighting evolution that the pros would not even have considered it. I mean, who thought it up? An architect because he had hemmed in all the free space with his overwhleming roof.

I agree that it was not technically extremely complicated to design such a bending needle. Even if we sadly never saw it slide into position, even Beijing's cauldron was more advanced than that, due to its weight and its position on the roof.

But one must say that the roof of Athens' Olympic Stadium was/is far less overwhelming and left far more possibilities for cauldrons than the "full circle" roofs of the Birds Nest, of London's Olympic Stadium or of Maracana Stadium. Calatrava didn't have to position the cauldron exactly where he positioned it. Before the Athens Games, there was a computer render showing a huge needle at quite a distance from the Olympic Stadium but also on the same axis as the actual cauldron - and we speculated back then (or at least I did ;)) whether that could be the cauldron. Well, the huge needle was never built but instead it got that little sister which was installed directly at the stadium as the actual cauldron.

Sometimes I wished that Olympic Stadia would have more of a roof like Athens' stadium. Sochi at least does, but Rio will bring us another edition of the Games with big difficulties where to put the cauldron. I don't know how Pyeongchang's new ceremonial venue will look like, but maybe they'll have a problem there, too.

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I find your bitterness towards Athens amusing! Did you have a bad Moussaka encounter or something?

No; call it what you will. It just got raves which I find it did not deserve--if anyone knows their Olympic ceremonies. And as long as there is breath and energy in me, it will be put in its place where it belongs.

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No; call it what you will. It just got raves which I find it did not deserve--if anyone knows their Olympic ceremonies. And as long as there is breath and energy in me, it will be put in its place where it belongs.

It's really just tiresome. You ask others to see your POV but you are so insistent on reminding others of the amount of vitriol distain you have for an event that challenged the norm. I know my Olympic ceremonies quite well --- even if I am new on these forums-- and it doesn't take an expert to see that Athens ceremonies were immensely "Olympic" in theme, VERY Greek, very modern, and the first real high-tech Games ceremony. You had a Greek director who has trained under some of the most acclaimed theatre directors in the world. But apparently you know better...

I think you dislike it because it is the antithesis to the 90's carnival pageantry of Atlanta. Fanfare isn't the only way it can be done.

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It's really just tiresome. You ask others to see your POV but you are so insistent on reminding others of the amount of vitriol distain you have for an event that challenged the norm. I know my Olympic ceremonies quite well --- even if I am new on these forums-- and it doesn't take an expert to see that Athens ceremonies were immensely "Olympic" in theme, VERY Greek, very modern, and the first real high-tech Games ceremony. You had a Greek director who has trained under some of the most acclaimed theatre directors in the world. But apparently you know better...

I think you dislike it because it is the antithesis to the 90's carnival pageantry of Atlanta. Fanfare isn't the only way it can be done.

Greek and modern? :lol::lol: Nah...don't think so. How modern can parading a bunch of faux mannequins on platforms around a faux lake be? The ancient Romans created water spectacles in the Colosseum, b.c., and at a nearby natural lake. So how modern is that idea? Greek and modern do not quite belong in the same sentence in terms of ceremony.

U can always skip my posts about it. U do have that choice, u know.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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My SUBJECTIVE views (and how can any opinions on cerermonies be anything BUT subjective?)

Which ceremonies (IMO) were more slickly produced - Athens or London? Athens'.

Which ceremonies (IMO) were the more enjoyable? London's.

There's a lot I liked about Athens' ceremony (I loved its history tableau, for example). All in all though, It wasn't "joyful" for me. I had a lot of a better experience and fun watching London's.

As for the cauldron, I've said before, yes, London's lighting and location was a letdown. It's still my favourite cauldron of all time in terms of beauty, though. I was never a fan of Athens' "joint", or its lighting.

That's must my opinion. I don't expect to change anyone else's opinions on them.

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Well, I guess it depends on what you find enjoyable. Different things appeal to different people.

I agree that Athens didn't offer an especially "jubilant" OC. However I did find it beautiful, dramatic, elegant, intelligent -- and I enjoyed it for those reasons.

The tenor of London was definitely different and was focused on warmth and greater accessibility. I think that's a great way to go -- a totally viable and appealing take on an OC. I do believe, however, that one can be warm and accessible and still be thoughtfully structured and well-executed. In my opinion, London had the first part of the recipe, but not the second.

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Well, I guess it depends on what you find enjoyable. Different things appeal to different people.

I agree that Athens didn't offer an especially "jubilant" OC. However I did find it beautiful, dramatic, elegant, intelligent -- and I enjoyed it for those reasons.

That's it in a nutshell - personal taste. I agree Athens' was beautiful and intelligent - but it still left me cold, overall.

It's like movies - I know a lot of cinemafiles worship Paul Thomas Anderson as one of the greatest American directors. I wouldn't piss on a last copy of one of his films if I found it on fire in front of me - I truly resent the excruciating hours his "art" has put me through. Give me a Scary Movie IV over his pretentious shite any day.

Edited by Sir Rols
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I agree with you about PT Anderson.

LOL - I thought I'd remembered you were a PTA fan. Must be someone else who reacted when I couldn't resist having one of my swipes at him! ;)

I'm the first to admit, my tastes in entertainment tend to the more low-brow.

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That's it in a nutshell - personal taste. I agree Athens' was beautiful and intelligent - but it still left me cold, overall.

Yeah, that's about it. And really odd, considering it was something put on by supposed warm-blooded Mediterraneans. But where was the passion? It must've been completely removed by the London office of Jack Morton; and put in for 2012! :lol:

It's like movies - I know a lot of cinemafiles worship Paul Thomas Anderson as one of the greatest American directors. I wouldn't piss on a last copy of one of his films if I found it on fire in front of me - I truly resent the excruciating hours his "art" has put me through. Give me a Scary Movie IV over his pretentious shite any day.

OMG, Rols. Speaking of the devil, I was forced to see PTA's latest, THE MASTER, because I belong to a film discussion group. I HATED IT. Pretentious piece of mierde!! Total waste of my time & money. Luckily, when I asked the box office, jokingly mind you, if I could have my money back, and one of them actually agreed it was a subpar film, they offered me a pass for a future show. Of course, I took it. So I was partially mollified...but I lost 2 hrs of my life to such bullsh*t!!

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London had 7 kids lighting petals.

That truly is an absurd comment. Did you 'get' the whole theme of the London 2012 Games?

Instead of opting for some ridiculous Olympic theme like 'The World is full of flowers' or 'Kiss my Donkey' or such nonsense (oh, 'One World, One Dream' now comes to mind - please pass me the sick-bag!), London went for the idea of 'Inspire a Generation.'

This was reflected in the selection, not of a great Olympian such as Steve Redgrave or Roger Bannister but of potential future Olympians, names not yet in the public domain.

In my view, this was an original idea and one that worked very well and also one that London doesn't seem to be getting much credit for on here!

As one who was at the London 2012 Opening Ceremony, I can tell everyone that the lighting of the Cauldron, the music, the entrance of the torch and the final coming together of the 'petals' came across as a stunning execution of a highly original piece of theatre.

I think I have mentioned before that everyone around me gasped as the 'petals' rose up to form the Cauldron and that wasn't just because at nearly 1.00am, it had turned a bit nippy!

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I agree that Athens didn't offer an especially "jubilant" OC. However I did find it beautiful, dramatic, elegant, intelligent -- and I enjoyed it for those reasons.

I think that's very well-put and my main response is 'fair enough!'

I think for me, one of the disappointments of the Athens' Ceremony was that they had this (brilliantly executed) idea of filling the infield with water, lighting the rings upon it (again very well done) but then the water was drained away and they did nothing else with it.

To this day, I just wonder what their thinking was. Why didn't they use the water for a longer period of time?

Just imagine what more they could have done with the unique stage provided by what was effectively a lake? Very disappointing.

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I think for me, one of the disappointments of the Athens' Ceremony was that they had this (brilliantly executed) idea of filling the infield with water, lighting the rings upon it (again very well done) but then the water was drained away and they did nothing else with it.

To this day, I just wonder what their thinking was. Why didn't they use the water for a longer period of time?

Just imagine what more they could have done with the unique stage provided by what was effectively a lake? Very disappointing.

Exactly. Just compare it to how Salt Lake used their ice "lake." It was an integral part of the show.

Here's about the best video on Part One of Salt Lake right now.

The most Athens tried to impress the viewer was getting their pants wet in the water--as when one of the drummers in the very opening, waded in! Oh wow, the crowd thrilled to that! Boy, this is going to be an easy crowd to please. They'll buy anything! :D

The thing with Athens' OC was that it was a show of some great highs...but a lot of lows, and the middle was just mediocre. It was very cold, clinical and cerebral...not something one could warm to. The head, the DNA, the so-called 16 or 17 lighters...but so what? One knew they were all controlled by very complicated cables...but where was the humanity? Where was the Greek and human spirit? Nowhere. U can only do so much with that 'heartbeat' thingie. All the joy showed up in the Closing...which (I think) did NOT have a single flying element.

Watch the rest of the Salt Lake Opening (it's too bad there isn't a good, complete version on Utube right now) -- and see how they worked both the ice and what they called the "dry land" portions--how they meshed very well...and how they told the story of Utah, the West, the athletes, etc. It was a very integrated show. And on the ice, they had fire, they had hidden lights -- and performers were always moving...pulsating energy...NOT posing as mannequins which one can go to a museum for...NOT in a living, in-the-moment, $500-a-seat-admission event that a "live" ceremony is supposed to be.

With SLC's Scott Givens at Sochi's helm, I expect their ceremonies to be very exciting ones, much like 2002.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Is Sochi being directed by the SLC guy? It's going to be good! I hope it has high polish that current tech can offer; and I hope for high creative concept, surprises and emotion.

And beauty.

Duh, singin' to the choir here!

I wonder how hard it would be to go?

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the water was drained away and they did nothing else with it.

To this day, I just wonder what their thinking was. Why didn't they use the water for a longer period of time?

Just imagine what more they could have done with the unique stage provided by what was effectively a lake? Very disappointing.

Here are some thoughts from another thread:

I saw SLC. It was very enjoyable. I just preferred Athens.

Athens used the water in many creative ways:

1.) to set the mood and establish the setting of the Games. The importance of this must not be under-estimated. The water branded Athens' Games evoking both the Aegean, the logo, and the modern Greek minimalist sensibility. It set Athens apart from all other hosts.

2.) as playground (splashing drummer, lovers)

3.) as element (contrasted to fire (rings), air (numerous aerial objects, Eros, etc.), earth ("islands" and later the dry ground of the stadium floor)

4. As literal representation of the sea -- (boy in boat and other moments)

5. As mirror (centaur and other moments)

6. As projection screen (double helix).

7. As uniting symbol joining the ages (the Klepsydra performers all joined together in the water as the tree rose up).

8. As foreshadowing of the primordial soup referenced in Bjork's Oceania (the sea of water replaced by sea of humanity -- athletes)

More than anything the water was the thing that created the aura of Athens' magical "unforgettable dream Games." It's mere presence was fantastical. Who expects to walk in to a flooded stadium with sun glinting off the rippling water? We see ice rinks all the time.

Athens didn't need a naval battle, a wave machine, water skiers, synchronized swimmers or whatever all else people may want to throw at them. The water played an emotional and conceptual role. That's what made it elegant and beautiful. Some individuals seem to wish it had been used as more of a gimmick -- which would have cheapened and compromised the aesthetic of the whole OC.

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