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London 2012 Olympic Cauldron...


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It's almost life they're TRYING to hide the flame. The fact that it's now no longer visible from the Orbit thanks to its new position just adds insult to injury.

I also dont understand people making a financial excuse. LOCOG found an answer for the stadium wrap. Although the wrap did improve the look of the stadium, in the grand scheme of things it would've been smarter to earmark the funds for a visible cauldron. If it was an either/or decision, it should've been the cauldron.

I really think this cauldron was a terrible mistake and I think it's going to leave a lasting scar on people's memory of the London Games -- not least because of the transparent double-speak and elitist justifications of a lousy decision.

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I also have to question whether the Orbit tower played any role in the decision as that seems to have been designated as the focal point of Olympic Park.

EXACTLY!!! The flame would have overshadowed the Orbit as a "tourist attraction", which as they say on their website, "is London’s major new visitor destination – both during the Games and beyond." So the decision was to kill the flame and promote the orbit, without actually admitting it!

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EXACTLY!!! The flame would have overshadowed the Orbit as a "tourist attraction", which as they say on their website, "is London’s major new visitor destination – both during the Games and beyond." So the decision was to kill the flame and promote the orbit, without actually admitting it!

If that's true (we really can't know)-- it's criminal.

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EXACTLY!!! The flame would have overshadowed the Orbit as a "tourist attraction", which as they say on their website, "is London’s major new visitor destination – both during the Games and beyond." So the decision was to kill the flame and promote the orbit, without actually admitting it!

Yet if they had also built the Orbit to double as a secondary permanent cauldron, it would be even more of a "tourist attraction!"

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Going to go out on a limb here, but I think the London 2012 cauldron is one of the best ever, if not THE best.

The lighting was superb and emotional. I loved it, and it refined the concept we saw in Vancouver, which was quite frankly clumsy and awkward.

The way it comes together elegantly for the Games, only to come apart afterwards and be taken all over the world, is an amazing interpretation of the meaning of the Olympic flame and the Olympics themselves as something quite fluid, and forever absent after the event itself.

While I understand people are disappointed it cannot be seen from outside the stadium - this is not a policy, but rather a precedent set by the majority of hosts. It's the first in-stadium cauldron since Seoul 1988, and understandably people are adjusting to the concept. But hat off not London 2012 for its earnest nod to 1948 and for using restraint. Sometimes less is more.

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The designer created his vision. He wanted this concept rather than a flame up high in the sky. The Seoul cauldron was inside the stadium, the London 1948 cauldron was in the same position. Im sure there have been others. This was the designers vision, and its his desision to make. Only coming on this tread have I even found out people have a problem with it. Being in the park nobody is walking round looking glum at the fact the flame is inside the stadium, nobody seems scared by it, nobody is being offered councilling.

The concept is gorgeous, the lighing up there in the top 3. The design is the best ever in my opinion. Only people on this forum seem concerned by it

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Hear, hear!

Such much needed perspective from London itself. :)

I would put the actual lighting of the cauldron of London 2012 with Barcelona 1992 and Sydney 2000 as equally the three best ever, in terms of emotion and creativity.

However in terms of the actual cauldron itself, this would have to be one of the most beautiful. Other cauldron designs I've appreciated is the slender precision of Athens 2004, the modernity of Barcelona 1992, the classic Los Angeles 1932/84, the space-age simplicity of Munich 1972, and the classic form of Melbourne 1956.

Speaking of Munich - there is a slight resemblance in function (the individual gas nodes) to London 2012, forty years later:

kpacontentminepix041431.jpg

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The designer created his vision. He wanted this concept rather than a flame up high in the sky. The Seoul cauldron was inside the stadium, the London 1948 cauldron was in the same position. Im sure there have been others. This was the designers vision, and its his desision to make. Only coming on this tread have I even found out people have a problem with it. Being in the park nobody is walking round looking glum at the fact the flame is inside the stadium, nobody seems scared by it, nobody is being offered councilling.

The concept is gorgeous, the lighing up there in the top 3. The design is the best ever in my opinion. Only people on this forum seem concerned by it

Not true at all. The cauldron's location was a big topic in all the media covering the Olympics during the last few days (including the major British newspapers), on German TV they reported for example that many viewers are asking critical questions about why the cauldron isn't visible from the outside. This is not just an issue for us Olympic forum nerds.

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The concept is gorgeous, the lighing up there in the top 3. The design is the best ever in my opinion. Only people on this forum seem concerned by it

Cauldron complaints have been on our evening news every single night so far -- not to mention featuring in your own British media.

This is not about the design. It's about what feels like an elitist isolation of the cauldron from anyone without an athletics ticket, plus the intentional extinguishing and relighting of the flame. I think that having an 82 year old guy on a cherry picker light the flame that will burn throughout the Games is an appalling choice.

Truthfully, I'm shocked. This whole cauldron was an awful decision and the IOC should have stopped it long ago. So every NOC gets to take home a charred piece of metal (have you seen the state of those petals?). It's a wonderful intellectual idea, but practically this cauldron concept is a massive failure and a huge blot on London's Games.

Seb Coe's and other Brits' defenses and justifications just show how out of touch they are with the rest of the world.

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Cauldron complaints have been on our evening news every single night so far -- not to mention featuring in your own British media.

This is not about the design. It's about what feels like an elitist isolation of the cauldron from anyone without an athletics ticket, plus the intentional extinguishing and relighting of the flame. I think that having an 82 year old guy on a cherry picker light the flame that will burn throughout the Games is an appalling choice.

Truthfully, I'm shocked. This whole cauldron was an awful decision and the IOC should have stopped it long ago. So every NOC gets to take home a charred piece of metal (have you seen the state of those petals?). It's a wonderful intellectual idea, but practically this cauldron concept is a massive failure and a huge blot on London's Games.

Seb Coe's and other Brits' defenses and justifications just show how out of touch they are with the rest of the world.

I have to agree with you. I really love London's ceremony and the Games overall so far but I am also massively disappointed with the thinking behind this cauldron logistic. I really love the design and the idea of 204 burning petals to come together as one large flame. I think this is the most potent and meaningful cauldron concept ever, and its visually appealing too. But all these falters when the designer fail to grasp the very essence and basis of the cauldron and Olympic flame, for it to be seen by Park wide visitors. One shouldnt compare it to 1988 Seoul Games, it is a different era and God knows why they have a small cauldron. But ever since then, all cauldrons have been big and visible and that is what people preferred, no matter how much conceptual idea you trying to argue to have in small and inside. I still cannot comprehend that LOCOG/ IOC approves of this, and that image of the rusty cherry picker, the old fella and the construction worker is going to stick with me at least, as that is the moment when the final cauldron was lit. I'm sorry as much as you deny it, that is the truth.

I hope the petals can be fully cleaned and polished up before sending up to the NOC. Otherwise they will just be burned charred copper, not exactly the nicest souvenirs to take home to.

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This sculpture in Pioneer Place Shopping Ctr in Portland, OR remindes me of the cauldron concept. Would be nice if the cauldron "petals" and stalks were more to this scale, and then more visible to the park too. Of course it would be vastly more complicated to devise a mechanism to fold much larger arms into place (another reason to keep smaller), but for the olympics one would think it might be worth the effrot. Imagine how spectacular!

3452948360_1317b644fd_z.jpg

Not like this guy isn't used to working on a larger scale.

(unfortunately the Heatherwick sculpture bellow was ultimately dismanteled due to structural issues)

heatherwick_studio_lightbox_b_bang_welding.jpg

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The hoods (petals) also remind me of these David Weeks light fixtures, which I used in a lot of projects back in the 2000s.

213159_0_4-3459-modern-chandeliers.jpg

Edited by paul
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Not sure why Lord Coe wouldn't want the Olympic Cauldron to become London's mecca for 17-days....unless, he knows they screwed up and is trying to grasp at straws for an excuse.

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4358965089_348332830f.jpg

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It's an elegant and creative design. It is not a functional design.

As a piece of sculpture, it's a success. As an Olympic cauldron it is a failure.

Actually...yeah...good call, but as a cauldron should be placed in view...There should've been a Glass Wall at the back of where it now sits so we could at least have a view. This going to be one of the post games issues when everyone, including the GB Forum users, tear apart what is turning out to be a very average games.

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The designer created his vision. He wanted this concept rather than a flame up high in the sky. The Seoul cauldron was inside the stadium, the London 1948 cauldron was in the same position. Im sure there have been others. This was the designers vision, and its his desision to make. Only coming on this tread have I even found out people have a problem with it. Being in the park nobody is walking round looking glum at the fact the flame is inside the stadium, nobody seems scared by it, nobody is being offered councilling.

The concept is gorgeous, the lighing up there in the top 3. The design is the best ever in my opinion. Only people on this forum seem concerned by it

Yes. Rah-rah London, whatever.

The designer's vision thing is bullshit. What does that have to do with being publically seen? It's the freaking Olympic Cauldron. It's to be seen by everyone. The design may indeed be stunning but what the hell is the point if no one can see.

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One of those huge, crowd-packed thoroughfares at the Olympic Park would've been the perfect place to move this cauldron to or have an identical one at.

Though i'm not convinced it's the most aesthetically pleasing thing. It only looks nice from certain angles and the flame burns really unelegantly.

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Actually...yeah...good call, but as a cauldron should be placed in view...There should've been a Glass Wall at the back of where it now sits so we could at least have a view. This going to be one of the post games issues when everyone, including the GB Forum users, tear apart what is turning out to be a very average games.

Post games issues? It seems you're already busy tearing everything apart! But hey, don't let me stop you having your fun!

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Would've been nice to see the cauldron in broadcasts when they cut to commercial, but so far during these games, no cauldron. Despite even Boris saying we'll be able to see it on TV.

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It's Lord Coe's insistence that the cauldron is not "a tourist attraction" I find most troubling. That argument is very demeaning to the spectators, people who have spent a great deal of money to get to London and are caught up in Olympic fever. As some one else wrote (I forget who) the Games themselves are the ultimate tourist attraction. Isn't that a big part of why London wanted to host? They wanted their moment in the spotlight. They wanted the world to come to them, to marvel at all London has to offer. If the Games are the ultimate tourist attraction and the Olympic flame is THE iconic symbol of the Games (so much so that the IOC won't allow candidate cities to use images of the flame in their logos) then it had darn well better be on public display.

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That's why I decided not to go to London this year. I just knew I wasn't going to be able to see the cauldron "live." :P

Would've been nice to see the cauldron in broadcasts when they cut to commercial, but so far during these games, no cauldron. Despite even Boris saying we'll be able to see it on TV.

NBC had one such moment in its broadcast this day so far. Have been watching 5+ hours of their daylight telecast. And in the evening telecast, they have opened after commercials with close-up shots of the friggin' cauldron. WHen it's all bunched together, it's not really a very inspiring cauldron design.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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^^I can't still believe NBC is the only source you guys in US can get to watch (video) the games on TV...

Even down here in the third world we have 10+ HDTV (2 in Open-Air TV) channels with continuous live TV coverage...

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