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Sir Rols

Rugby World Cup Japan 2019

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I was hunting around any couldn't find a thread dedicated to Japan 2019 yet, so figured might as well start one.

Anyway, I was just wondering ... does anybody remember or know if Japan was/is still proposing some matches in Hong Kong or China in 2019?

I remember they were proposing that in their 2011 bid (and with Singapore even, I seem to remember), but can't remember if they stuck with that for the 2019 bid.

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Yea they had matches being proposed in both Singapore and Hong Kong. Irb doesn't lke the fact those two venues are far from Japan though.

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I can't imagine if a FIFA WC hosted by Japan, Singapore and Hongkong at the same time, that will be a nightmare for logistic... Don't know what will happen if Japan goes with Singapore and Hongkong

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I can't imagine if a FIFA WC hosted by Japan, Singapore and Hongkong at the same time, that will be a nightmare for logistic... Don't know what will happen if Japan goes with Singapore and Hongkong

This is the Rugby world cup, and hosting games in other countries at other countries have happened in the past but not has far as Hong Kong/SIngapore is from Japan.

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Wow, Then how to tackle the logistic issue ?? I mean Rugby is a team sport, same with football.... Is in Rugby WC, a team only playing in one city ?What about the knock-off stage ??

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Yea they had matches being proposed in both Singapore and Hong Kong. Irb doesn't lke the fact those two venues are far from Japan though.

I don't think the IRB had much problem with that - not when you consider, for example, a France WC has matches up in Edinburgh and to date, only SA 1995, Oz 2003 (after the Kiwis droppd out of co-hosting) and NZ last year have ever managed to be hosted in a single country. More it was just the numbers the Old Boy Unions have in the IRB, and South Africa and NZ swapping preferences and support. Oz and England were very vocal in backing Japan for 2011, and the heated media outcry in Oz and England after the Old Farts turned their back on a new frontier is what forced them to award 2015 and 2019 simultaneously - so the IRB crowd would have no choice but to finally give Japan a chance.

Old history, but it was very heated, both in the general media and here (there's still Kiwi GamesBidders who don't forgive Oz and England not supporting them - and still let us know it, eh Alex?).

To me, HK is a no-brainer. Perfect place to hold some pool matches and the HK 7s give them tradition in the game. And as far as I recall, only pool games would have gone out of Japan - the knockout stages would all have been in Nippon.

Still no answer though if any matches offshore are pencilled in for 2019?

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I don't think the IRB had much problem with that - not when you consider, for example, a France WC has matches up in Edinburgh and to date, only SA 1995, Oz 2003 (after the Kiwis droppd out of co-hosting) and NZ last year have ever managed to be hosted in a single country. More it was just the numbers the Old Boy Unions have in the IRB, and South Africa and NZ swapping preferences and support. Oz and England were very vocal in backing Japan for 2011, and the heated media outcry in Oz and England after the Old Farts turned their back on a new frontier is what forced them to award 2015 and 2019 simultaneously - so the IRB crowd would have no choice but to finally give Japan a chance.

Old history, but it was very heated, both in the general media and here (there's still Kiwi GamesBidders who don't forgive Oz and England not supporting them - and still let us know it, eh Alex?).

To me, HK is a no-brainer. Perfect place to hold some pool matches and the HK 7s give them tradition in the game. And as far as I recall, only pool games would have gone out of Japan - the knockout stages would all have been in Nippon.

Still no answer though if any matches offshore are pencilled in for 2019?

Well its 2019 Hong kong makes sense Singapore does not. South Korea even makes more sense then Singapore.

@Titus Rugby matches are played 5-10 days after one another unlike football at most 3-4

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Well its 2019 Hong kong makes sense Singapore does not. South Korea even makes more sense then Singapore.

I don't think that's an issue. The RWC, as I've said before, isn't so concerned about co-hosting or travel. It'd be about the same as Perth to Sydney in an Oz WC. And again, it was never really mentioned as none of the reasons Japan lost 2011 (and we were following it VERY closely, and heatedly, here).

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I don't think that's an issue. The RWC, as I've said before, isn't so concerned about co-hosting or travel. It'd be about the same as Perth to Sydney in an Oz WC. And again, it was never really mentioned as none of the reasons Japan lost 2011 (and we were following it VERY closely, and heatedly, here).

Not sure how calculations work in distance, but using google maps and this the difference between P/S and SING/Tok is about 2,000 km more for the latter.

Right now the "powers" of Asian rugby are Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Hong Kong, UAE and Sri Lanka only Hong Kong and Korea would make sense.

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Not sure how calculations work in distance, but using google maps and this the difference between P/S and SING/Tok is about 2,000 km more for the latter.

Right now the "powers" of Asian rugby are Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Hong Kong, UAE and Sri Lanka only Hong Kong and Korea would make sense.

It's not that much about Rugby power - Japan is (even then debatably) about the only one in Asia who comes close to being one (I think it's still the only one that's yet made a WC). HK and Singapore make sense more for their facilities than any of the others you mentioned.

As far as I'm aware, Korea has NEVER been mentioned inn the mix for co-hosting.

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Anyway, just did some digging. HK and Singapore WERE still listed as venues for 2019 in the bid plan, but both withdrew last year, so it'll be a Japan only tournament.

Edited by Sir Rols

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Anyway, just did some digging. HK and Singapore WERE still listed as venues for 2019 in the bid plan, but both withdrew last year, so it'll be a Japan only tournament.

Oh what a shame, but Hong Kong has the sevens each year so not a huge loss.

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<_< Me thinks China wants to bid for a future tournament...AND the idea of a Japanese flagged event on Chinese soil is still too much to stomach.

:angry: Naturaly, NZ backs China's decision to withdrawal Hong Kong's hosting!

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Innovative National Stadium to boost RWC 2019

Preperations for Japan’s hosting of Rugby World Cup 2019 have been further boosted with the selection of a futuristic and innovative design for the redevelopment of Tokyo's National Stadium, which will be at the very heart of Asia's first-ever Rugby World Cup.

The Japan Sport Council (JSC) selected the winning design by globally-renowned Zaha Hadid Architects, designers of the striking London 2012 Aquatics Centre, following an international contest to deliver an iconic and innovative 80,000 venue with world-class sporting, fan and hospitality facilities.

Completion of the stadium, which incorporates a full roof and sweeping aerodynamic features that are set to make the venue a top draw for fans atttending Rugby’s showcase global event, will be achieved well in advance of its major event debut at Rugby World Cup 2019. It will also be the centrepiece of the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games if Tokyo’s bid is successful.

The design fits perfectly with Japan Rugby 2019 and Rugby World Cup Limited’s shared vision of delivering a Rugby World Cup that showcases Asia’s unique tradition and innovation, while generating lasting impact for participation in Japan and throughout Asia.

Japan Rugby 2019 Board member, Tokyo 2020 Executive Board Member and JSC President, Dr. Ichiro Kono said the selection underscored Japan's committment to deliver an outstanding Rugby World Cup for teams and fans.

"The winning design has a strong power to deliver our message to the world. From now on we will channel all our energy in turning this design into the best stadia in the history of Rugby World Cup, utilising Japan’s technological excellence and commitment to achieving the highest standard."

"Rugby World Cup 2019 will be the biggest sporting event Japan has ever experienced, and it’s very exciting to host it in what will be one of the world’s greatest stadia. As a multi-purpose stadium with cultural and entertaining functions, the new National Stadium will serve an important role in further enriching our sporting culture and if the Tokyo 2020 Olympic bid is successful, the stadium will be the centre stage for two of the world’s three biggest sports events in the space of two years."

Japan Rugby 2019 President, Chairman & CEO of Canon Inc., Fujio Mitarai said: "This is an exciting milestone in the delivery of Rugby World Cup 2019 in Japan. The National Stadium is a symbol of Japan’s rich sporting and Rugby heritage. The plans to deliver an innovative, modern and world-class purpose-built facility in time for Japan 2019 is not only incredibly exciting for us, but also the global Rugby family."

"Japan Sport Council (JSC) is a major partner in the delivery of Rugby World Cup 2019. We share a common vision of a tournament for Japan, Asia and the global Rugby family and I would like to thank them for their vision, drive and ambition. We look forward to working in partnership with them to deliver an outstanding Rugby World Cup."

"We are, of course, supportive of the Tokyo 2020 bid as we strongly believe that hosting the Olympics will be good for sport in Japan and great for Rugby World Cup 2019. There is no doubt that if Tokyo 2020 is successful in its bid that Japan 2019 will benefit in a range of areas, not least that the Japan public will be excited about sport."

Rugby World Cup Limited Chairman Bernard Lapasset added: "The National Stadium is an iconic venue and it is fantastic that there will be a state-of-the-art and innovative complex with an increased capacity in place for Rugby World Cup 2019."

"It will be an opportunity to showcase the National Stadium to the world in 2019 and this announcement is an important step forward in planning and preparation as we deliver an event that will benefit Japan, Asia and the global Rugby family."

"Rugby is blossoming in Asia on and off the field with participation having increased by 19 per cent in the last four years. Japan is the flag-bearer in terms of results on the international stage and participation, but we are committed to working in partnership with the Asian Rugby Football Union, the Japan Rugby Football Union and all tournament stakeholders to ensure that event preparation and successful delivery benefits Rugby throughout Asia."

IRB

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Dec. 20, 2012 - Rugby World Cup 2019 Tournament Organiser, Japan Rugby 2019 (JR 2019) has announced details of the policy and timeline for the selection of venues to host matches at the ninth Rugby World Cup, the first Rugby World Cup in Asia.

...

Japan Rugby 2019 President, Chairman & CEO of Canon Inc., Fujio Mitarai announced: "The JR 2019 Board has confirmed that the selection of Rugby World Cup 2019 venues will be announced in May 2015 following a rigorous process in order that the local hosting authorities may observe at close quarters Rugby World Cup 2015 to ensure the delivery of an exceptional experience for the teams and domestic and international fans."


"In the build-up to this important announcement, we have been busy consulting with local governments and venue owners across the country who have all expressed a strong interest in hosting Rugby World Cup games. It has been an exciting process seeing so much interest seven years out from the tournament."

The Match Venue Selection Policy is:

Prepare stadia and facilities where a vibrant 'Rugby and Football culture’ can develop
Popularise, develop and invigorate the sporting culture of hosting regions.
Provide dreams, happiness and great memories to all people
Contribution to regional development
Consideration for regional balancing as a broader national project.
Spread of excitement of hosting Rugby World Cup so that benefits can be felt throughout Japan

...

IRB

http://boxscorenews.com/high-demand-to-host-rugby-world-cup-matches-as-venue-selection-process-p52525-68.htm

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Clearly the IRB holding out for Japan in 2019 shows that the RWC will become a major FifaWC sized event from then onwards. I'm just wondering if Tokyo wins the 2020 Olympics, would this be the true reason for refurbishing the Olympic Stadium.

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Clearly the IRB holding out for Japan in 2019 shows that the RWC will become a major FifaWC sized event from then onwards. I'm just wondering if Tokyo wins the 2020 Olympics, would this be the true reason for refurbishing the Olympic Stadium.

The problem that this presents however, is that there isn't as much common ground when it comes to hosting a fifa world cup sized RWC..... in a nation which excels at rugby.

You can do it for the FIFA WC, but we can't have too many RWC's in nations where the host is being thrashed by 80 points - which is what is going to happen time and time again for Japan in 2019.

I still don't believe that the current structure of Japan Rugby is one that will encourage growth in a Japanese National Rugby team.

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I'd like to see RWC move to SA in '23 unless Argentina raises it's hand.

There seems to be some kind of prestege about Japan hosting...Clearly the money is still there in corporate Japan and Japan has always made it it to every RWC and got good spectator support...On the field they may be minnows but economically they are giants.

Looking at NZ a year on...Apart from ramshackle Eden Park, and stunning Dunedin, there really isn't much of a legacy. Most grounds have gone back to their provincial modes albeit some with a few extra seats...2039 is still a long way off.

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I think the NZ RWC legacy is more of a human scale, and never was really going to be anything overly physical in terms of stadia - though many small but useful developments were done to the provincial grounds.

I think it gave us a better sense of optimism as a country, and this rolled on through to the way we reacted to a very good Olympics for us in London - kind of changed the way we felt in terms of celebrating us.

A more technical legacy I think, was probably revving up the concept of sport event volunteerism, going that one step on from the mum and dad helping out for the local Age grade netball tourney - though to a huge mobilization of people.

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Is singapore/hong kong still in the running

no...move back through the thread for explaination.

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Actually, it looks like there's still a slight hope Singers and Hongkers could get a guernsey:

Japan reveals selection process for 2019 Rugby World Cup

January 4 - A timescale for the selection of venues for the Rugby World Cup in 2019, along with the criteria for potential venues, has been announced by Japanese organisers.

Japan 2019 (JR 2019) are due to announce the venues for the World Cup in May 2015, following a "vigorous selection process" according to board president, Fujio Mitarai.

Details of the requirements for potential host stadiums were also announced following a meeting of the Organising Board, as the country prepares to host the first Rugby World Cup to take place in Asia.

JR 2019 hope to leave a lasting legacy from hosting the World Cup, and they will select venues according to their potential ability to create "excitement" in order to raise the sport's profile across the continent, whilst ensuring that the whole country benefits from hosting the event by having various venues spread all over Japan.

"We have been across the country talking to local Governments and venue owners who expressed their interest in hosting Rugby World Cup games." said Mitarai.

During the bid process four years ago Japan had promised to host matches in Hong Kong and Singapore if their campaign was successful.

It is not clear whether this is still on the agenda.


But Rugby World Cup Limited (RWCL) chairman, Bernard Lapasset, is still predicting that the tournament will be an historic success.

"Japan 2019 will be a major milestone - the first Rugby World Cup to be hosted in Asia and we are working in partnership with JR 2019, the Japan Rugby Football Union, JSC (Japan Sport Council) and local and regional authorities to bring to life a shared vision that ensures that the hosting of the tournament delivers multiple strong positive impacts so that rugby growth is boosted throughout Asia," he said.

"This process is another significant step along the way to achieving that goal and I am delighted that there is such strong interest and appetite from venue and cities wanting to host matches at Rugby World Cup 2019, underscoring the strength of the Rugby World Cup brand."

Nationwide research will begin this month as JR 2019 look to receive feedback from those involved in the sport in Japan.

Insidethegames

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RWC 2019 host preparations ramp up in Japan
(IRB.COM) Monday 27 May 2013
Rugby World Cup 2019 tournament organisers Japan Rugby 2019 have today officially launched the process that will deliver the match venues that will be at the heart of a festival that will welcome and engage fans the length and breadth of Japan and around the world.
Since Japan was given the right to host RWC 2019 in 2009, the organisers have received strong responses from prefectures and cities wishing to be at the heart of one of the world’s largest sports events.
The process for venue selection was outlined as follows:
May 27, 2013 - Launch process and distribute expression of interest pack to interested local governments
June-July 2013 - Distribute RWC City and Venue Guide to cities and venues who express interest in hosting RWC 2019 matches
August 2013 - Workshop with local governments and venues on process and general hosting requirements
October 2013 - Distribute full set of venue and city requirements
November 2013 - Workshop with local governments and venues on detailed venue requirements
December 2013-September 2014 – One-on-one meetings with individual local governments and venues
October 2014 - Venue tender submissions
November 2014-February 2015 - Venue visits by key stakeholders
March 2015 - RWC 2019 match venue selection
Japan Rugby 2019 and Rugby World Cup Limited will work closely with interested venues throughout the process to ensure all parties fully understand the benefits and requirements of hosting RWC matches. Selected venues will have an opportunity to take part in the RWC 2015 observer programme in England to experience tournament operations and the hosting opportunities RWC provides.
Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe provided the introduction to the RWC 2019 match venue selection documentation stating: “I, as Prime Minister of Japan, support the successful Rugby World Cup 2019 in Japan. It is important that all citizens of Japan will work together to make sure this prestigious international sport tournament is a great success as a national project over the coming six years.”
Rugby's development in Asia will be accelerated
“I believe that the development of Rugby in Asia will be accelerated by having RWC 2019 in Japan. This will echo the vision of the International Rugby Board to make Rugby a truly global sport. Japan has a proud history of having successful international tournaments such as the FIFA 2002 Football World Cup and IAAF 2007 World Athletics Championship by receiving strong government support and I am sure that RWC 2019 will be a huge success with all of Japan coming together as one.”
Speaking at a packed media launch where the pillars of the tournament vision were also unveiled, JR 2019 President Fujio Mitarai said: “The launch of the venue selection process represents a landmark day for the tournament. It is the day when the tournament comes alive for the people of Japan.”
“Through this process, we are able to give Japan a platform to show its desire to play a significant part in hosting one of the world’s most prestigious major sports event and an opportunity to showcase our rich and diverse regions to a global audience of billions.”
“The final selection of venues will celebrate Japan, its innovation and heritage while providing the stage for the world’s best Rugby players to showcase a sport that has at its core the character-building values of integrity, solidarity, passion, respect and discipline.”
“We have been delighted by the interest in hosting matches that we have already received. Now we can focus on the exciting job of working with all stakeholders to deliver venues that will be great for Rugby World Cup and great for the image of Rugby in Japan and across Asia.”
Earliest venue process launch
Rugby World Cup Limited Chairman Bernard Lapasset said: “The fact that this is the earliest venue process launch in the history of Rugby World Cup speaks volumes about the intent to host an event that will deliver significant participation and profile benefits well in advance of the opening match kicking off. The Japan Rugby 2019 organising body should be applauded for its forward thinking.”
“This landmark announcement is a further boost in the delivery of the largest single sport event ever hosted in Japan and a breakthrough for Rugby World Cup in Asia, where Rugby participation has grown by 19 per cent in the past four years.”
“Rugby World Cup 2019 is on track to be a wonderful success, delivering a boost to the development of the Game in Asia and around the world and generating multiple trade, tourism and economic benefits for Japan.”
Director General for the Sports and Youth Bureau at the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) Kimito Kubo stated: “The RWC 2019 match venue selection process officially starts today. We look forward to seeing the development of the process with close communication between the local governments who wish to host the matches and JR 2019 as the tournament organiser. As the Japanese Government, we will continue our support to deliver the success of the tournament by forming a very solid scrum with all the ministries and government organisations involved.”
JR 2019 also outlined the details of a tournament vision that will excite and engage fans across Japan, Asia and the world.
Japan's clear tournament vision
The Japan 2019 vision is to deliver a tournament that is accessible to all people in Japan, a nationwide event that unites the country through sport, friendship and Rugby’s character-building values. It will also be an event that will provide the stage to develop Rugby in Japan, across Asia and around the world through successful commercial and impact programmes.
The pillars of JR 2019's tournament vision are:
• We will welcome the world with ‘strong NIPPON’
• We will make the tournament even more exciting
• We will introduce the spirit of Rugby to all
• We will contribute to Rugby’s continuing development in Asia
The announcement comes on the eve of Wales’ tour of Japan. It is the first time in 12 years that the current RBS 6 Nations champions and RWC 2011 semi-finalists have toured the country. JR 2019 and the Japan Rugby Football Union are determined to capitalise on the opportunity to promote the sport and its stars to a wider audience ahead of the final RWC 2015 qualifying push.
JRFU President Yoshiro Mori said: “We are excited about the two Tests against Wales and the platform it will give us to showcase the sport, its values and our hosting of Rugby World Cup 2019 to a wider audience. We have a young team that is building towards Rugby World Cup 2015 qualification and beyond and we are all focused on achieving Japan’s strongest and best ever performances at a Rugby World Cup on our home soil.”

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Japan "excited about the opportunity" to be hosting 2019 Rugby World Cup

August 2 - Japanese Ministers from across the political spectrum have reaffirmed their commitment to hosting the 2019 Rugby World Cup and claim they are "excited about the opportunity" to deliver benefits to Japan, Asia and the global rugby community.

Speaking at a general meeting of the Members of Parliament Group for Success of Rugby World Cup 2019 in Tokyo, the Ministers underscored their cross-party support and determination to work in collaboration with all stakeholders to ensure that the event is a success for all.

"The hosting of this meeting is a very important step towards the collaborative delivery of what will be the biggest single sport event ever hosted in Japan and the first Rugby World Cup in Asia," said former Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori, the vice-president of Japan 2019.

"The group is excited about the opportunity that the event will deliver for Japan, its people, economy and also for our close friends in Asia.

"Having cross-party support is a critical facet in the successful delivery of a major sports event.

"The first big achievement which was created by this group was to make an official request to the Japanese Government to rebuild our national stadium for 2019, which was eventually realised.

"We will continue working on various subjects for any assistance to make Rugby World Cup 2019 a great success."

Key items on the meeting's agenda included the outlining of plans to increase the visibility and profile of rugby and the world cup and to ensure a legacy beyond 2019 to deliver long-term boosts for the sport in Japan and Asia.

A recent victory over Wales and wins over Canada and the United States in the International Rugby Board (IRB) Pacific Nations Cup in 2013 have given rugby a timely boost within the country.

Japan currently has around 110,000 men, women and children actively playing the sport - a figure that puts the nation inside the world's top five rugby-playing nations and the largest in Asia - and with plans in place to raise participation at a schools level hopes are high that the number will soon rise.

japan_2019.jpg

Japan's 23-8 victory over Wales in Tokyo in June was a boost for the sport ahead of 2019

The meeting included an election for Board members of the Parliamentary and Nobutaka Machimura, the former Chief Cabinet Secretary, and Shinichi Nakatani, who belong to Japan's House of Representatives, were elected for the respective positions of President and secretary general.

http://www.insidethegames.biz/sports/summer/rugby-sevens/1015359-japan-excited-about-the-opportunity-to-be-hosting-2019-rugby-world-cup

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