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National Stadium(1964 Olympic Stadium)


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Very wise of you. For a start, if you examine the plans carefully, it become apparent that the running tracks in both designs have inside lanes 400 metres long !

I went to Tokyo today and here are some photos.

Very happy to enter the field . Some kissed on the grass and I heard many people never knew the smell of the grass is so fresh. I'll be able to enter the New stadium in 2019 if I apply by the

Palette, what would you say was the general state of the stadium?

I remember when the old Wembley was demolished a few years ago some people were upset, but it really was a bit of a dump and needed replacing. Is the 1964 stadium in decent condition architecturally, what's the leg-room like between seats, are the views ok etc?

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Palette, "demolition" is the better word. Is Godzilla the project manager? :lol: j/k!!

Oops,I thought -ing was fine. Minilla is a manager maybe :D .

Palette, what would you say was the general state of the stadium?

I remember when the old Wembley was demolished a few years ago some people were upset, but it really was a bit of a dump and needed replacing. Is the 1964 stadium in decent condition architecturally, what's the leg-room like between seats, are the views ok etc?

If I say in a word and very generally,the stadium is old and I felt we have used this for long time.I guess not so many people have upset for the demolition of this stadium. We do not think we don't need to build a new one. No one says "no" (at least residents in Tokyo) about the construction of new national stadium. I don't think this stadium is bearable to bigger quakes.For this I'll ask more to Japan Sports Counsil or Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.I hope to post again with details.Sorry I can't reply now and if this was what you'd like to know most. Each seat was small and had no backrest.I had difficulty when I seat myself because of very small leg-room.The views were OK ;) .

Did I answer to your questions?

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Govt to talk with Masuzoe on new venue

4:50 am, February 26, 2014The Yomiuri Shimbun

The government has decided to ask the Tokyo metropolitan government to pay ¥50 billion, or about 30 percent, of the ¥169.2 billion required to build the new National Stadium, the main venue for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, in Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo, The Yomiuri Shimbun has learned.

The government will discuss the matter with Tokyo Gov. Yoichi Masuzoe on Thursday and decide the division of expenses between the central and metropolitan governments by the end of the current fiscal year.

Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Minister Hakubun Shimomura will ask the metropolitan government to pay the ¥50 billion during talks with Masuzoe at the metropolitan government building on Thursday evening.

The metropolitan government initially planned to construct the main stadium in the Harumi district in Chuo Ward, Tokyo, during its campaign to host the 2016 Olympics. At that time, the metropolitan government estimated the project’s cost at ¥100 billion. According to sports ministry sources, the metropolitan government planned to receive grants from the central government to cover half of the cost and shoulder the remaining ¥50 billion.

The government, therefore, decided to ask the metropolitan government to contribute ¥50 billion for a project to build the new National Stadium at the place where the National Stadium currently is located.

According to the ministry, the central government shouldered the entire cost of building the existing National Stadium. The stadium is owned by the Japan Sports Council, an independent administrative institution. It is rare for the metropolitan government to partially bear costs for redeveloping an independent administrative institution’s facilities.

The sports ministry regards the metropolitan government’s shouldering of part of the costs as an exception. The new National Stadium can be used as a shelter if a large-scale disaster hits the Tokyo metropolitan area.

“We want to ask the metropolitan government to take on a reasonable burden because [the new stadium] will provide great benefits to Tokyo residents,” a senior education ministry official said.

In November, then Tokyo Gov. Naoki Inose and Shimomura agreed the metropolitan government will pay part of the costs to build the new stadium. However, discussions between the central and metropolitan governments on the matter ran into a trouble as Inose then expressed reluctance to bear the cost. No further arrangements were made between the central and metropolitan governments because Inose resigned in December.

According to the sources, Shimomura met senior Liberal Democratic Party members of the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly in December and obtained their understanding for ¥50 billion.

The government decided to restart talks with the metropolitan government on the matter as Masuzoe, who was supported by the ruling parties, won the Tokyo gubernatorial election earlier this month and the Sochi Olympics have ended.

In addition to the new National Stadium, the metropolitan government plans to construct or renovate 12 facilities for the 2020 Tokyo Games, including the Ariake Arena for volleyball and the Olympic Aquatics Center for swimming events. The total cost is estimated at ¥150 billion. Therefore, if the metropolitan government agrees to shoulder ¥50 billion for the new National Stadium project, the total expenditure for developing facilities alone for the Tokyo Games will total ¥200 billion.

Before the meeting between Shimomura and Masuzoe on Thursday, former Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori, who is president of the Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games, and other coordination council members will have talks with them in the metropolitan government building. During the meeting, the first to be attended by Masuzoe, the schedule of the construction of the new National Stadium and other issues are expected to be discussed.

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001065488

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Japan set to send off an old friend

(FIFA.com) Wednesday 5 March 2014
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© Getty Images

Japanese football will bid farewell to an old friend on Wednesday with the National Stadium in Tokyo to host its final Japan match ahead of renovation for the 2020 Olympic Games.

Aside from being a chance for Samurai Blue players to audition for 2014 FIFA World Cup™ selection, the encounter against New Zealand will take on added meaning.

The match brings together the two teams after their original meeting was cancelled as a result of the earthquake which struck Japan in 2011, while New Zealand suffered its own tragedy in Christchurch that same year.

The 56-year-old stadium was originally built with the 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games in mind, while football has often taken centre stage with regular national team and major domestic club matches including - since 1967 - the annual Emperor’s Cup final.

International matches have included the Intercontinental Cup between the champions of Europe and South America during the 1980s and 1990s, as well as the 2012 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup final.

Japan coach Alberto Zaccheroni said: “I know the stadium has long served as a symbol of Japanese football. This will be my first game at the National Stadium, but it will be nice if people can remember me as the last national team coach to play at the National Stadium.”

Japan plays Cyprus on 27 May before departing for the World Cup, where they have been drawn alongside Greece, Cote d’Ivoire and Colombia.

New Zealand failed to qualify for Brazil after losing to Mexico in a play-off.

http://www.fifa.com/world-match-centre/news/newsid/229/278/1/

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Will they re use some of the materials from the old stadium like recycle?

Will they re-use the materials used in the Old National Stadium.

Japan sport council;http://www.jpnsport.go.jp/kokuritu/

Click English on left top so to change language.

Click inquiry on top right.

You can find address and phone number of London office of JSC. No emails are available so call and ask them.

I've called headquarter in Tokyo so I know the answer already.

No-one here is working for Hadid or Tokyo 2020.

I hope 'll be ;) .

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  • 2 months later...
Visitors take a last look at National Stadium

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More than 7,000 people joined a tour of the National Stadium in Tokyo on Sunday, one of the Golden Week holidays, before the stadium is set to be demolished in July to make way for the construction of the main venue for the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

According to the Japan Sport Council, which manages the stadium, only 50 people per day initially participated in tours that started in January. But interest grew and tour participants have reached 10,000 as of Friday.

During the tours, participants not only were allowed onto the field, but also visited the locker rooms and had a close look at the Olympic cauldron, used for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, from the top step of the rear stand.

A first-year high school student from Tokorozawa, Saitama Prefecture, was impressed when he touched the grass on the field. “It’s fluffy and soft,” the student said. “I wish I could have played soccer at the stadium.”

A 52-year-old man who has watched the national soccer team play at the stadium said with a smile, “I was as excited as a national team member facing a big match.”

The remaining tours will be conducted on Wednesday and May 22. The new National Stadium is scheduled to be completed in 2019.

Yomiuri

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001257917

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I'll visit National Stadium to join the final event(May 31) :) .Last chance to enter the stadium before demolition!The field will be open from 21:00 to 23:15.


DSC00359_R_zpsc0dcbd48.jpg

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I don't find the point to demolish that stadium. The bowl looks great and functional. A nice roof would have been enough, but not the hideous Hadid design. It gives me heebie-jeebies.

I agree- don't see why they couldn't have done an Athens and put a roof over it and modernised. Quite sad.

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I agree- don't see why they couldn't have done an Athens and put a roof over it and modernised. Quite sad.

The track does not comply with modern standards. To re-tool the stadium would have been more expensive and not really save the stadium, it makes more sense to bull doze it and erect a new stadium.

I don't find the point to demolish that stadium. The bowl looks great and functional. A nice roof would have been enough, but not the hideous Hadid design. It gives me heebie-jeebies.

I like that Hadid design, it really is not that bad. For me it screams TOKYO, it just has the foreign look.

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Ultimately what a stadium looks like from the outside is probably the fifth most important thing, after structural soundness, functionality for athletes, interior views for fans, and expense.

I don't dislike the aesthetics of this stadium, but it does look like "futuristic appearance" was given first priority over everything else.

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