Jump to content
yukke14

National Stadium(1964 Olympic Stadium)

Recommended Posts

It is complement from you to refer to Hadid (and her team!) as artists-- they would appreciate the complement and may even think of themselves that way, too-- but first and foremost they are architects. Art is an aspect of architecture, as is engineering, but it is distinct.

This used to be the case (that architects cared about the Vitruvian triad) but it is not really true of postmodern architects. Or if it is still true then I can't see it in Frank Lloyd Wright, Santiago Calatrava, etc. All they care about is appearances. If a building collapses, leaks, etc then too bad.

Edited by Nacre
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To go back on topic, if we may, some may remember that the new renders features a river passing by the stadium that doesnt exist at this moment. It appears that they (the government of Tokyo, probably) are going to lengthen the Shinjuku river to reach the stadium and the surrounding parks.

NWDgHEO.jpgMhcwaF3.png

https://twitter.com/tokyohotweb/status/690308000125300736

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're interested, there was a press conference at the Foreign Correspondence Club of Japan about ten days ago where Kengo Kuma presented the design and answered several questions including the issue of plagiarism and the withholding of payment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you were wondering, they are saving as far as I know all the original murals and statues within and on the grounds of the old National Stadium. Here is where they will be relocated in the new stadium.

YJxZtjp.png

cps58b0.png

o8JUNXG.png

S8sZ2zu.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually think this stadium is going to be one of the best in a very long time. If it turns out well it would be worth the loss of heritage from 1964.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually think this stadium is going to be one of the best in a very long time. If it turns out well it would be worth the loss of heritage from 1964.

In a very long time as in 8 years???

Beijing_Birds_Nest.jpg

Say what you will about Beijing as the host of the Olympics, but that stadium is a beauty.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a very long time as in 8 years???

Beijing_Birds_Nest.jpg

Say what you will about Beijing as the host of the Olympics, but that stadium is a beauty.

I'm well aware - I saw it in person in 2008. Also - that would be 12 years ;) (seeing as we're obviously excluding Rio and London's efforts).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Japan to put more lottery revenue toward Olympic stadium cost

The Cabinet on Friday formalized a bill to allocate more revenue from sales of the nation’s “toto” sports promotion lottery toward the costs of building the new ¥149 billion National Stadium.
The bill will revise the law on the business of the Japan Sport Council, an independent administrative agency and the operator of the lottery program. The government hopes it will be enacted during the current Diet session.
The central government, the Tokyo metropolitan government and the JSC have agreed that half of the stadium construction costs will be borne by the state and 25 percent each will be covered by the metropolitan government and revenues from the toto lottery.
The bill calls for raising the proportion of toto revenue used in stadium construction to up to 10 percent during fiscal 2016 to 2023. Currently, the figure is set at up to 5 percent.
Toto raked in record sales of ¥110 billion in fiscal 2014, seven times the sales logged in fiscal 2004, according to JSC.
The bill also stipulates that up to one-third of the overall costs should be borne by the metropolitan government.

 

FEB 16 2016

The Japan Times:http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/02/19/national/japan-put-lottery-revenue-toward-olympic-stadium-cost/#.Vsf_BvmLTIU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Olympic Cauldron for Stadium in Tokyo May Pose Fire Threat

Plans for the new stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics may have to be reviewed over concerns that the installation of the cauldron may violate fire laws.

Tokyo organizers decided Thursday to set up a panel to review where to place the cauldron for the Olympic flame. The review team will be headed by Olympic minister Toshiaki Endo and will come up with a solution as early as April.

The construction plan by architect Kengo Kuma includes stands covered by wood materials and the location of the cauldron could violate the Japanese Fire Service Act.

Work on the stadium fell behind schedule when the government abandoned an earlier design by architect Zaha Hadid because of spiraling costs.

AP

http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireStory/olympic-cauldron-stadium-tokyo-pose-fire-threat-37366590

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Olympic Cauldron for Stadium in Tokyo May Pose Fire Threat

That's a headline for the News Quiz if ever I've heard one! :lol:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tokyo Olympic cauldron missing in stadium design

Under current plans, the final torch bearer for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics might as well keep running.
It has come to light that the latest redesign of the new National Stadium--the main venue for the Tokyo Games--has no place for the cauldron where the Olympic flame will be lit for the duration of the event.
“When we asked the organizing committee about what it wanted for the stadium, no mention was made about having the Olympic cauldron within the stadium,” said a high-ranking official of Japan Sport Council (JSC), which is in charge of construction. “We did not consider the location of the cauldron when we were seeking out new designs.”
The new design was needed after the original blueprint by London-based Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid was scrapped because of ballooning costs.
The JSC in late December picked a new design by Kengo Kuma. Recently, it came to light that the design contained no space for the cauldron.
Hadid’s original design also envisioned placing the cauldron outside the stadium because a roof would cover the seating area.
The JSC has intended to place the cauldron outside the National Stadium, but this idea has infuriated the organizing committee for the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics.
The lighting of the cauldron by the final torch bearer marks the start of an Olympics. International Olympic Committee provisions state that the cauldron should, in principle, be located within the main stadium and be visible to all those in the venue.
The cauldron has been placed outside the main stadium for two Winter Games, but never for any Summer Olympics.
“It would be disgraceful because it would be unprecedented for a Summer Olympics,” a high-ranking official of the Japanese Olympic Committee said of the JSC’s plan.
On the evening of March 3, a task force was set up headed by Toshiaki Endo, the Cabinet minister in charge of the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, to come up with a proposal for placement of the cauldron. The committee will also discuss which entity will be in charge of the cauldron and how the costs will be shouldered.
One deadline under consideration is the period before the start of the Golden Week of national holidays in late April.
Simply cramming the cauldron inside Kuma’s designed stadium would be difficult. Under that design, the roof covering the seating area is made of wood, and having flames near wood amid thousands of spectators might be frowned upon by proponents of the Fire Service Law.
If the cauldron is placed on top of the roof, some spectators would not be able to view the Olympic flame. Moreover, the wooden roof could collapse under the weight of the cauldron.
Another redesign of the stadium to make room for the cauldron could lead to other problems.
Spectators in certain sections would likely be unable to see the cauldron. Additional expenses could be tacked on with a design change.
Citing past history, a high-ranking official of the Olympic organizing committee said, “I believe there are many people who feel the cauldron should be installed within the new National Stadium, in the same manner as the old national stadium.”

March 04, 2016

The Asahi Shimbun:http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/sports/AJ201603040039

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*sigh* I like Kuma stadium, but when I read and heard it was made of wood, I kinda feared this would happen, and looks like my fears became true. There have been lots of fire cases in Tokyo and overall, Japan, due to many houses and locations using wood as main material for their construction (specially old houses), which is why they have a very active firefighting force. Positioning the cauldron way too near to the wooden roof would mean lots of risks.

Either they will have to install a tall tower outside the stadium which could be visible from those inside, or they will have to make changes on the stand configuration so they could fit a cauldron similar to London's. But for what I read in the article they don't seem to be willing to perform the first option.

I'm also annoyed that they didn't tought about this beforehand and included cauldron considerations when the designs were submitted. Talking about not thinking on long term.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Not bad tbh, but that idea was already explored in Vancouver 2010 for the BC Place and was skipped. It would be way too expensive to mantain a cauldron of that kind.

The closest thing done to this was the lightning of Guadalajara 2011 cauldron and in the end, the flame ended at a sole cauldron despite the sequence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

..this running in air while slung up to a harness and wires is such a bad effect (looking @ you Beijing), I hope no one ever does it again. It's in the same category as the bad "flame on a wire" thing in Atlanta.

-just my opinion-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the problem I addressed in my book. As they did in Sydney, Ric Birch or someone in charge of ceremonies was involved in the stadium design from the start. Obviously, the same mistake of NOT having a produce involved from the start is a big mistake. But humans being human, commit the same mistakes time and time again. Nothing has been built yet...and everything is still in the blueprint stage (and wood is easy and cheap enough to alter), so I think they will probably start addressing the issue now. I mean they have a designated place for the 1964 cauldron; I don't see how they can miss a spot for the 2020 cauldron. The ingenious Japanese will find a solution to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They could somehow mount it on the white metal support bars surrounding the stadium and have it come over the glass section of the roof. If not, it might be best to do something london-y where the cauldron simply isn't tangibly visible (oxymoron) from outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stadium architect plays down Olympic flame mistake, says solution being sought

Kyodo

  • Mar 10, 2016

The architect of the new National Stadium has said his team is remedying the nation’s latest Olympic blunder: nowhere for the Olympic flame to burn.

Kengo Kuma said work is underway to find space for a cauldron that traditionally burns during the tournament, adding that it may be necessary to lift fire restrictions for the event.

Kuma’s design, adopted in December, replaced a previous effort that was junked on cost. It lacked provision for a cauldron because there was no mention of it in a government development plan in August.

The IOC stipulates that the cauldron should be ideally placed somewhere visible both from inside and outside the stadium.

“The reviewing team is already working on it, and once the direction is there, I’ll deal with it accordingly,” Kuma said during a speech Wednesday at the Japan National Press Club. “There are various methods (to set it up), so there’s no need to worry.”

Kuma said the placement of a cauldron was not on the agenda during the December bidding. His design incorporates much wood, including stands covered by wood materials.

He played down fears that the cauldron could fall foul of the Japanese Fire Service Act.

“I didn’t propose it at the bidding because it wasn’t requested, but I thought it was highly likely to be placed inside the stadium, looking at the London Olympics, for instance.”

“The edge of the roof is made of iron, so a fire will not spread. Either way we’ll be requesting to lift the restriction (of the law) on condition of placing it in a safe location. We’re simulating various possibilities.”

Kyodo

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/03/10/national/stadium-architect-plays-olympic-flame-mistake-says-solution-sought/#.VuFIo-b5YkF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this article that included a very intersting quote from our friend Mori...

Mori said he had spoken with International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach and been given consent to use the cauldron from the 1964 Games, the previous one hosted in Tokyo, for the 2020 edition.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2016/03/11/more-stadium-issues-tokyo-2020-team

I personally would rather have the original cauldron reused than have them try (and possibly fail) at another attempt at an iconic cauldron like the one they have today. I imagine the LA cauldron was reused for a similar sentiment, since they could have built an entirely new one if they had wanted. I feel like the existing cauldron, after it's ongoing tour of the country, would fit very well in the new design since it is not gigantic and relatively manageable (meaning cleaning after the games are over it isn't an ordeal).

Maybe they'll base the torch off of the cauldron if this happens...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The old one is one of the best cauldrons ever but it would be cool to see something new and spectacular. But I wouldn't be sad if they rolled the old one out if Japan devised a spectacular lighting sequence.....but it better be good.

The LA cauldron is built into the peristyle so I'm not sure it should ever be changed.....thank god. Can you imagine if some genius decided to stick something like the French Fry box from Atlanta there....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The LA cauldron is built into the peristyle so I'm not sure it should ever be changed.....thank god. Can you imagine if some genius decided to stick something like the French Fry box from Atlanta there....

I don't think there was anything wrong with the cauldron itself from Atlanta.

1996olympics_gallery__550x371,0.jpg

What was an eyesore though was that tower it was sitting on. Yuck!

2291416329_96c8c9c9001.jpg

I don't understand why that had to look so complicated.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ That French fries cauldron. Everytime

French%20Fries%2005.gif

Also i'm really convinced now the Organizing Comittee need to think before doing stuff because they obviously don't know how to planify things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...