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National Stadium(1964 Olympic Stadium)


yukke14
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Something called "Design Implementation" spans from August 2014 to September 2015, which is similar to the demolition schedule.

The words translated as "Design Implementation"(実施設計 in the document) is detailed design or final design;the work of drawing up a diagram that is capable of being manufactured from the plan set in the baseline design.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Death of Yoshinori Sakai, who lit the flame at the 1964 Olympic Games when he was 19.

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The IAAF is very saddened to hear of the death of Yoshinori Sakai, who lit the flame at the 1964 Olympic Games when he was 19. He died of a brain haemorrhage at a Tokyo hospital early Wednesday morning (10) at the age of 69.

He was born in Miyoshi, Hiroshima Prefecture, on 6 August. 1945, the day that the city of Hiroshima was struck by an atomic bomb.

In 1964, as a first year student and aspiring sprinter at Waseda University, he was chosen for his historic role that summer to symbolize Japan's post war reconstruction and peace.

As the 100,713th and final torch bearer at the 1964 Olympic Games, he carried the torch up the stairs to light the cauldron in the National Stadium at the opening ceremony.

He won the Japanese 400m title in 1966 and also won a gold medal as part of Japan’s 4x400m team at the 1966 Asian Games in Bangkok, and as well as a 400m silver medal.

After finishing competitive athletics, he became a journalist and sports producer with the Fuji Television Network.

The IAAF wishes to pass on its condolences to Yoshinori Sakai’s family and friends.

IAAF

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100,000 torchbearers ? Surely that's a mistake by an extra digit?

No. Japanese records always include the 2 reserve runners/per torch-holder and the 'honor guard' of about 20+ runners per mile. This is cleared up in my book (page 114). There were actually only 870 torchbearers - but the Japanese always counted the 'supporting cast'. I don't know why. I can't imagine what they will do for 2020.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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  • 3 weeks later...

http://online.wsj.com/articles/tokyo-hopes-new-olympic-stadium-is-golden-opportunity-but-some-see-red-1412287117

Good article that shows the two different sides of the argument about building the stadium. Apparently after delays deconstruction will actually start in December, but construction of the new stadium will begin on time in October of next year. Some people seem to fear the the stadium and its 80,000 (give or take a few hundred given the retractable seating on the bottom tier) capacity will be a white elephant, but the JSC argued that there are plenty of events that will aid in an overall revenue of 3.3 million USD after operational costs.

It also mentions a possible use for a future World Cup, so that's something to look forward to.

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Bidding reopened for Tokyo's Olympic stadium construction
TOKYO — A new round of bidding for construction of the main stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will delay the start of the problematic project.

Some of the bids were reviewed by someone in the decision committee before all bids were in, a violation of the rules, Japan Sport Council official Takayuki Ito said on Tuesday.

Another round of bidding is due this month. But he said construction will be fast-tracked, and the stadium will meet its March 2019 deadline.

''We need to revamp the whole system of planning for the Olympic stadium,'' he said, acknowledging there were too many problems.

Ito declined to say who broke the rules, but suggested it was an error and not a malicious act.

Plans for the stadium, designed by award-winning British-Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid, have been plagued by problems, including complaints from some prominent architects, who say the design is too big and expensive.

The 80,000-seat, futuristic design to replace the National Stadium was initially projected to cost 130 billion yen ($1.3 billion), but the estimate quickly ballooned to more than double that. It is expected to be scaled down.

There have been other problems in the bidding as well.

In the first round of bidding, announced in March, all the bids surpassed the estimated costs and were rejected in May. In June, it was found that some bids were lower than the level set as the standard. A month later, complaints of bid-rigging surfaced. But an internal investigation in July and August found no evidence of bid-rigging, the council said in a statement last month.

Ito denied any scandal in the lowest bid getting rejected, and said it did not meet the required standard.

Demolition of the old stadium will start in the middle of December, delayed by more than two months from the initial schedule.

The council promised to introduce electronic bids and better educate council members to avoid future problems.

The 54,000-seat National Stadium, built in 1958, was used for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

The site, in a downtown Tokyo park, is within walking distance of a landmark Shinto shrine and a famous venue designed by Kenzo Tange for the 1964 Olympics

AP

http://www.foxsports.com/olympics/story/tokyo-summer-games-2020-stadium-bids-construction-delay-reopen-100714

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Workers move a half-century memory Granite slabs memorializing the gold medalists from the 1964 Tokyo Olympics were removed Tuesday from the facade of National Stadium, which will be torn down and replaced for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics. The slabs, engraved with names of all 319 champions along with the heading “TOKYO 1964,” were set up above the stadium’s main entrance in 1965 as a lasting tribute to the Games. Along with the foreign champions, the honor roll included Takashi Ono, now 83, who won a gold in the men’s gymnastics team competition, and the much-heralded women’s volleyball team, known popularly as the “Witches of the Orient.” The plates will be kept in storage until a museum, which will be attached to the new stadium, is completed in 2019. They will then become part of the museum’s collection.

Yomiuri Shimbun

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001624831

http://www.bdonline.co.uk/news/arup-lands-key-role-on-tokyo-olympics/5071333.article

this article is how some company named Arup is going to help Tokyo with the process of venue design and construction, along with legacy after the games and junk. They were part of Beijing and London's legacy, so it's not like they don't know what they're doing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is a little old but still good to read.

http://www.insidethegames.biz/olympics/summer-olympics/2020/1023431-tokyo-2020-chief-worried-by-national-olympic-stadium-demolition-delays

PM Mori (who is President of Japan's Ruby Union or something along with Tokyo 2020) is worried cause deconstruction is starting in December instead of October when it was supposed to start. I guess he doesn't want the world to see Tokyo's and really Japan's preparations like we saw Rio's. He's kind of vague but you can infer that he wants to keep the reputation of Japanese efficiency that always leads to success.

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Just found this article: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/108356.php

It's stuff we already know, but the last line caught my attention...

"Liquid crystal displays will be mounted on the back of the spectators' seats and are expected to relay information about events being held in the stadium or show live broadcasts of events held at other venues".

So each spectator gets a lil tv? Sound pretty expensive and risky given the kind of things a seat goes through over various events...

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Just found this article: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/108356.php

It's stuff we already know, but the last line caught my attention...

"Liquid crystal displays will be mounted on the back of the spectators' seats and are expected to relay information about events being held in the stadium or show live broadcasts of events held at other venues".

So each spectator gets a lil tv? Sound pretty expensive and risky given the kind of things a seat goes through over various events...

Sounds out of date already with hand held mobile devices and Wi-Fi, why do you need an installed screen?

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Just found this article: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/108356.php

It's stuff we already know, but the last line caught my attention...

"Liquid crystal displays will be mounted on the back of the spectators' seats and are expected to relay information about events being held in the stadium or show live broadcasts of events held at other venues".

So each spectator gets a lil tv? Sound pretty expensive and risky given the kind of things a seat goes through over various events...

Normally you'd be right, but this is Japan we're talking about...

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/world-cup/japan-fans-clean-stadium-after-world-cup-elimination-n140281

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Here's a bunch of new documents from some sort of meeting the JSC had with people against the stadium, just so that the opposition could present their ideas even though it kinda doesn't matter at this point. I don't know all the details, but there are some pretty pictures of how the opposition imagined the stadium could be renovated...

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The link to all the documents: http://www.jpnsport.go.jp/newstadium//tabid/446/Default.aspx

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Zaha Hadid's Tokyo Olympic stadium slammed as a 'monumental mistake' and a 'disgrace to future generations'

The 2020 Olympic stadium has faced two years of widespread criticism and budget cuts. Now prominent Japanese architect Arata Isozaki has launched a blistering attack on the designs

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2014/nov/06/zaha-hadids-tokyo-olympic-stadium-slammed-as-a-monumental-mistake-and-a-disgrace-to-future-generations

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http://www.designboom.com/architecture/meiji-jingu-gaien-stadium-petition-zaha-hadid-tokyo-olympics-05-14-2014/

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One of the comments in this article kinda said what I was already thinking.

While they raise some interesting points that need to be considered (and one wonders why they weren’t to begin with), I think there could be other motives behind their dissatisfaction with the stadium plans. The architects who are headlining this effort are both Japanese and male, while Zaha Hadid is both not Japanese and female. With this stadium being for the Olympics in Tokyo, it’s not a far stretch to suggest their objections are a mix of nationalism/racism, sexism, and pride.

You have Toyo Ito, a Japanese architect who actually submitted a bid for the design of the stadium that ended up losing out to Hadid on the shortlist stage. He, among others, complain how the stadium sits there like a blob, out of context with the rest of the park. But looking at his stadium proposal, don't you think his design has the same problems? I doubt his rose only 15 meters off the ground too. This hypocracy kinda shows that the leading architects opposed to the design are mostly butthurt that their or their colleagues designs didn't get picks, but that's just my interpretation. B)

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Maybe so, but Zaha Hadid stadium is still ugly and overexpensive anyway. Surely it won't help at all to alleviate the already screwed up reputation of Olympic games being a fabric of white elephants.

In all honestly there was nothing wrong with the Tokyo main stadium. They could had just expanded it a bit and installed a new roof.

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I remember reading somewhere that one of the main reasons they're demolishing not refurbishing is that it's not up to regulation anymore or something. I don't know what that really means but it is more than half a century old and they do use it for a lot of things throughout the year, so if they continue to it hopefully won't become a white elephant and the investment to redo the stadium completely will pay off.

I'm just hoping its going to looks better in real life than in the renders.


Edit: I went backa few pages cause I remember we talked about this before, and Palette posted this news article that's relevant.

Ministry deems National Stadium renovation plans unrealistic

The Yomiuri Shimbun

4:23 am, August 20, 2014

The Yomiuri Shimbun The sports ministry has deemed a proposal to renovate the National Stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics unrealistic, because of a number of drawbacks including insufficient earthquake resistance and building regulations that prohibit the blocking of sunlight from nearby structures.

Large-scale construction work would be required to improve the earthquake resistance of the current stadium, which officials say falls under the jurisdiction of both the Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry and the Japan Sports Council. With this in mind, the ministry and the council want to build a new stadium.

The renovation plans were presented by architect organizations and individual architects, including Toyoo Ito, who claim the reconstruction of a new stadium would damage the historic scenery of the Meiji Shrine Outer Gardens. The council and ministry have been reviewing these proposals.

According to this review, previous earthquake resistance checks showed that the current stadium would probably collapse if an earthquake with an intensity of upper 6 on the Japanese scale occurred. To improve the stadium’s quake resistance, almost all of the stadium columns would have to be enlarged to nearly three times their current size. Walkways and waiting rooms would become narrower and smaller as a result, inconveniencing spectators and athletes. The council added that problems could also arise in managing the Paralympics.

Another issue is that the seats in the northeastern area of the stadium would cast a shadow over the premises of the neighboring Seitoku Kinen Kaigakan, a museum. The shadow would violate Building Standards Law regulations that were revised after the stadium was completed. The issue must be resolved regardless of whether the renovation plan is adopted or not.

Should renovation plans proceed, the seats in the northeastern section—one-quarter of total stadium capacity—would have to be removed. In addition, 80,000 seats must be provided as promised to the International Olympic Committee. To honor this promise, new seats would have to be installed at the southwestern side that extends from the premises, distorting the shape of the stadium.

According to estimates, the total cost may be as high as ¥100 billion, including work to remove the seats. This is still less than the ¥136.7 billion needed to demolish the current stadium and build a new one. However, the state of the current stadium has continued to deteriorate as more than 50 years have passed since it was built.

The ministry and the council believe a huge amount of funds would be needed to cover future repair work if the current stadium is used. Therefore, the ministry and council have concluded that renovating the stadium is unrealistic.

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