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2020: Who's the Frontrunner?


  

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  1. 1. Who's the frontrunner in the 2020 race so far?



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2 villages for Istanbul would solve a lot of their logistical problems. And it's far cheaper and more efficient than adding another tube or bridge just to get participants over to the Asian side.

See, Emre and Fatixx,..the IOC is NOT crazy about express ferries. They did not want it for NYC's 2012 plan; they don't like it for Istanbul 2020.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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If, as looks likely, Turkey is the only candidate for Euro 2020 I'd find it impossible to believe their government would turn around to UEFA and say "actually, no, we don't want this". That'd be such

I think Turkey saying they want the European Championships and the Olympics will work against them. The IOC is not going to want a big show in town in June and the Olympics in August.

It's impossible for any country to stage the same year two major sport events such as Euro and the Olympic Games (and this has nothing to do with Turkey). It would create major challenges regarding ma

Japan also has a stimulating effect in mind in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami from March 2011 in which almost 20,000 people lost their lives and the meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant added a new and frightening dimension to the natural disaster.

Tokyo aims to stage the Games a second time, following 1964, and bid chief Tsunekatsu Takeda said Olympics can help the nation overcome the trauma from two years ago.

This type of PR makes my skin crawl. Do these people have no tact? Shamelessly using the deaths of thousands of people as leverage for an Olympic bid is foul. Very (emotionally) manipulative move.

I don't even think NYC's 2012 bid was ever that explicit following 9/11.

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2020 Candidate Cities submit their Candidature Files

07/01/2013

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced today that it has received the Candidature Files of the three Candidate Cities bidding to host the 2020 Olympic Games: Istanbul (Turkey), Tokyo (Japan) and Madrid (Spain). [1]

The IOC Evaluation Commission, chaired by IOC Vice-President Sir Craig Reedie, will now analyse the Candidature Files and make on-site inspections as follows:

Tokyo: 4 to 7 March

Madrid: 18 to 21 March

Istanbul: 24 to 27 March

The Commission will then prepare a detailed risk analysis report that will be published to coincide with the 2020 Candidate Briefing for IOC Members, which will take place in Lausanne on 3 and 4 July 2013. The election of the host city will take place on 7 September during the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

“The submission of the Candidature Files represents an important milestone for the Candidate Cities and the cities should be congratulated for their excellent work,” said IOC President Jacques Rogge.

Please note that the IOC will not release the Candidature Files, but has informed the Candidate Cities that they can make their files public and post them on their websites if they so wish as of tomorrow, 8 January.

Click here for all of the IOC documents related to the bidding procedure

[1] Cities are listed in the order of drawing of lots.

IOC

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I am afraid that Tokyo is the safest choice of them all. Istanbul is strong too, I hope the members that will vote may have in mind that new frontiers are trending :lol: But !adrid is slowly becoming a distant third due to the crisis.

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The Candidature Files from Istanbul, Madrid, and Tokyo.

olympic-2020-cities.jpg

On site inspections by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) of the three candidate cities bidding to host the 2020 Olympic Games will be made in March.

Olympic Games Executive Director Gilbert Felli and Head of Bid City Relations Jacqueline Barrett received the Candidature Files of the three cities in the running for 2020 – Istanbul (Turkey), Tokyo (Japan) and Madrid (Spain).

The IOC Evaluation Commission, chaired by IOC Vice-President Sir Craig Reedie, will analyse the Candidature Files and make on-site inspections in Tokyo (March 4 to 7), Madrid (March 18 to 21) and Istanbul (March 24 to 27).

The Commission will then prepare a detailed risk analysis report that will be published to coincide with the 2020 Candidate Briefing for IOC Members, which will take place in Lausanne on July 3 and 4.

“The submission of the Candidature Files represents an important milestone for the Candidate Cities and the cities should be congratulated for their excellent work,” said IOC President Jacques Rogge.

The Commission spends four full days in each city: there are briefings with the Bid Committee on the 17 themes of the Candidature Files, as well as site visits to the proposed venues. The Commission’s report is sent to all the IOC Members one month before the Host City election and is made public. The report will help the IOC Members to better understand the cities’ bids and will assist them when they vote to elect the Host City.

The election of the host city will take place on September 7 during the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Each Candidate City will deliver a final 45-minute presentation to the 125th IOC Session ahead of the vote.

The IOC does not release the Candidature Files, but candidate cities are permitted to make their files public and post them on their websites if they wish, from January 8.

http://horsetalk.co.nz/2013/01/08/olympic-host-cities-final-hurdle-2020/#.UOsuPzDJ23Y

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Tokyo odds-on favourites to win 2020 Olympic race, claim bookmakers

January 7 - Tokyo 2020 would host an Olympics and Paralympics that the world would "marvel at", claimed chief executive Masato Mizuno as they delivered its Candidature file here today.

Mizuno's optimism seemed to be shared by bookmakers, who installed the Japanese capital as the odds-on favourites after they had lodged their master plan with the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

"It's a superb, compact plan that utilizes civic energy and operational know-how to produce an Olympic Games the world will marvel at," said Mizuno.

Mizuno was supported by a delegation which also included Homare Sawa, the captain of Japan's World Cup winning women's football team in 2011, and Paralympic swimmer Takayuki Suzuki, the SB 50 metres backstroke gold medallist from Beijing 2008.

Sawa also won a silver medal at London 2012 and claimed that experience had help ignite her enthusiasm for the Olympics returning to Tokyo for the first time since 1964.

"I want to feel that deeply moving spirit from the London Games once again in Tokyo," Sawa said.

"I want to do all I can."

Mizuno and the athlete ambassadors were joined by Katsura Enyo, the senior director for planning for sports at Tokyo 2020, and Yasuhiro Nakamori, an Executive Board member of the bid.

Full details of their plans are due to be announced at a press conference in Tokyo tomorrow and then at an international event in London on Thursday (January 10).

"With tremendous support from people in Tokyo and across Japan, we have celebrated a memorable milestone today with the submission of our Candidature file," said Tsunekazu Takeda, the President of Tokyo 2020 and Japanese Olympic Committee, who will present their plans tomorrow.

"Based on lessons from our bid for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, we have retained the best of that bid plan while adding important new strengths.

"Now that our Candidature file is complete, Tokyo is one step closer to implementing an innovative and inspiring Games plan.

"The Games in 2020 in Tokyo will offer athletes, spectators and Olympic and Paralympic family members a true once-in-a-lifetime experience."

Takeda's belief that the Games could be heading back to Japan was echoed by British bookmaker William Hill, who are offering odds of 4/6 that Tokyo will win, with rivals Istanbul 5/2 and Madrid 3/1.

If successful at the IOC Session in Buenos Aires on September 7, it would be the third time Tokyo had been awarded the Olympics.

They won their first bid for the 1940 Games, which were later taken away from them because of the Second Sino-Japanese War and given to Helsinki, only to be subsequently cancelled because of World War Two.

"Tokyo may already have been awarded two Games but so had London and the third time they struck gold by hosting the best ever," said William Hill spokesman Joe Crilly.

Insidethegames

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I can't deny that Tokyo is the most technically capable, sound option, and it does appear to be making more noise than last time - I'm just wondering about the voting itself.

If you were to assume that same sort of IOC member who'd vote for Rio de Janeiro would give their vote to Istanbul for 2020 (which is quite a realistic assumption), it puts the Turkish city in a commanding position. Aside from the continental aspect, there are substantial similarities between Rio 2016 and Istanbul 2020. How are we so sure Tokyo will fare better against this type of sentimental voting pattern in 2020, if it went out in the second round in 2016? Granted I can't see Madrid fluking it past the first round again, I'm just wondering about the politics and agenda of the voting members. Tokyo only picked up 22 votes in the first round, and 20 in the second in 2009. I do believe the Japanese will do much better in 2020, but I think Istanbul has history on its side.

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If Madrid goes out in the first round which is quite probably, which candidate city will get those voters support? I'm leaning towards Istanbul, as those voters were leaning for a Euro candidate and Istanbul meets that requirement plus a new frontier.

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I can't deny that Tokyo is the most technically capable, sound option, and it does appear to be making more noise than last time - I'm just wondering about the voting itself.

If you were to assume that same sort of IOC member who'd vote for Rio de Janeiro would give their vote to Istanbul for 2020 (which is quite a realistic assumption), it puts the Turkish city in a commanding position. Aside from the continental aspect, there are substantial similarities between Rio 2016 and Istanbul 2020. How are we so sure Tokyo will fare better against this type of sentimental voting pattern in 2020, if it went out in the second round in 2016? Granted I can't see Madrid fluking it past the first round again, I'm just wondering about the politics and agenda of the voting members. Tokyo only picked up 22 votes in the first round, and 20 in the second in 2009. I do believe the Japanese will do much better in 2020, but I think Istanbul has history on its side.

Thing is, I think Tokyo keeps the options open most for 2024 - about every IOCer from Europe or Nth America would be happy. Only the Asian NOCs who have hopes for 2024 might be put out.

Plus, I don't think Rio is such a help for Istanbul. When they were awarded 2016, I'd already thought it was a bit of a killer for South Africa's (then expected bid) chances - I think the IOC would be happier to see Rio prove itself first before it made an immediate leap of faith again on another new frontier.

Emotionally, I'd love to see Istanbul win it, but I think they're campaign's been slip-shod and lacklustre so far.

Anyway, the nice thing about Tokyo, is that it would be perfect for viewing in Sydney's time zone - and cheaper for me to get there if I decide to go!

Edited by Sir Rols
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Thing is, I think Tokyo keeps the options open most for 2024 - about every IOCer from Europe or Nth America would be happy. Only the Asian NOCs who have hopes for 2024 might be put out.

I would agree. I'm sure the IOC would love to have more credible candidates next time around, like what they got accustomed to in the last 20 years, then just the mere 3 they have to chose from in this cycle. The last time the choices were so few for a Summer Olympics was for the 1988 race between only Seoul & Nagoya.

I can't deny that Tokyo is the most technically capable, sound option, and it does appear to be making more noise than last time - I'm just wondering about the voting itself.

If you were to assume that same sort of IOC member who'd vote for Rio de Janeiro would give their vote to Istanbul for 2020 (which is quite a realistic assumption), it puts the Turkish city in a commanding position. Aside from the continental aspect, there are substantial similarities between Rio 2016 and Istanbul 2020. How are we so sure Tokyo will fare better against this type of sentimental voting pattern in 2020, if it went out in the second round in 2016? Granted I can't see Madrid fluking it past the first round again, I'm just wondering about the politics and agenda of the voting members. Tokyo only picked up 22 votes in the first round, and 20 in the second in 2009. I do believe the Japanese will do much better in 2020, but I think Istanbul has history on its side.

Well, if we totally went by the final tally of votes repeat bidders got in the last race, then we'd also have to assume that Madrid would get past the first round for 2020. And you just said yourself, you can't see that sliding again.

Every race is different with it's own set of dynamics. I wouldn't underestimate Tokyo 2020 simply based on their vote tally from the 2016 race.

Plus, Tokyo, last time, also didn't really have continental rotation on it's side either, being only 8 years after Beijing 2008. I think this time that's not going to be much of an issue, if at all.

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This is where things get murky. Almost all European IOC members with potential bids coming up (So Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, Spain etc.) will vote for Tokyo most likely. North America's 5 members will surely vote for Istanbul. However where does that leave the British? Brazilians? etc?

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Every race is different with it's own set of dynamics. I wouldn't underestimate Tokyo 2020 simply based on their vote tally from the 2016 race.

Exactly, always a big mistake to view any race through the prism of the previous one.

Actually, if there were any parallels to draw, I'd put up for discussion that it's probably the 2018 race that is closer. Both had three contenders, We have the sentimental new-frontiers multiple repeat bidder (Istanbul-Pyeongchang), the strong technical bid everyone expects should do well but with some local support issues (Tokyo-Munich) and the quixotic bid no-one seems to hold much hope for (Madrid-Annecy).

Edited by Sir Rols
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I feel almost forced to concede on my part - 2020 is probably going to Tokyo. I have no problem with this, I just thought the odds were better for an Asian city in 2028, especially with the Winter Games in PC two years before. But, with the financial tide running against Madrid and Istanbul being a maybe, Tokyo has a really good shot at this.

I still prefer Istanbul personally, but no shame or fault with Tokyo.

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