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2020: Who's the Frontrunner?


  

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  1. 1. Who's the frontrunner in the 2020 race so far?



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If, as looks likely, Turkey is the only candidate for Euro 2020 I'd find it impossible to believe their government would turn around to UEFA and say "actually, no, we don't want this". That'd be such

I think Turkey saying they want the European Championships and the Olympics will work against them. The IOC is not going to want a big show in town in June and the Olympics in August.

It's impossible for any country to stage the same year two major sport events such as Euro and the Olympic Games (and this has nothing to do with Turkey). It would create major challenges regarding ma

"Compact" bid plans might sound good, and make a nice marketing line for a campaign, but really, I doubt any host ever been chosen predominantly because of such a plan?

Yea never has you need to please the IOC members the best :lol:

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I'm not convinced a compact plan is best in practice anyway. Opening up a bit can ease congestion. It can enable visitors to stay in a wider range of locales and discover more of the host city, while also opening up transportation. It also builds spirit to have more parts of the city involved.

Of course this can be taken too far. The athletes need comfortable travel times and it is nice for spectators having some venue clusters.

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I'm not convinced a compact plan is best in practice anyway. Opening up a bit can ease congestion. It can enable visitors to stay in a wider range of locales and discover more of the host city, while also opening up transportation. It also builds spirit to have more parts of the city involved.

Of course this can be taken too far. The athletes need comfortable travel times and it is nice for spectators having some venue clusters.

Exactly - there's gotta be a balance. Obviously, you can't get away with a too ridiculously spread out plan that dilutes the whole value of having it in one city (like, say, an San Francisco bid having the bulk of major events in San Jose or Oakland, or, dare I say, a Reno bid with major events in Sacramento), but on the other hand, I agree, I really think there's case that things can be too compact, cause congestion, and limit things to a single "Olympic Park" and not touch the wider city.

I just think people take this "holy writ" that compact plans are the superior plans too far. And I also think they have far less bearing on the eventual decision than is often assumed. As I stated originally, it's a nice marketing tagline, but I can't think really of any city that has been awarded the games for the sole or predominant reason that they a "compact" bid plan.

Once a city makes the short list, I strongly feel it's the "story" rather than the "plan" that wins the race.

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I think it's the story plus the confidence that win the race rather than the plan.

As long as there are no giant holes in the bid, I think the IOC is looking for two things:

1.) What's the compelling narrative inducing us to go to this place at this time?

2.) Who are the individuals, organizations and governments we will be working with and are we confident in trusting they will be reliable partners who will deliver on their promises?

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I still think there's value in the compactness in a winter games- it helps to create that sense of intimacy that gives winter games their charm.

For summer games, the host city is already probably a big metropolis that it will be hard to remain intimate anyway. Not to mention the good weather, it just makes you want to move around rather than stay in a certain part of a city.

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I think Turkey saying they want the European Championships and the Olympics will work against them. The IOC is not going to want a big show in town in June and the Olympics in August.

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I think Turkey saying they want the European Championships and the Olympics will work against them. The IOC is not going to want a big show in town in June and the Olympics in August.

Yes, there is now only one favorite... TOKYO ! Easy journey for them...

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Yes, there is now only one favorite... TOKYO ! Easy journey for them...

It's starting to look increasingly that way. So far Istanbul isn't inspiring the rock solid confidence that would be needed to win and Madrid nasal uphill battle with regard to their economy. If anybody challenges Tokyo, I'm betting it will be Madrid, but as of now it feels like 2020 is Japan's to lose.

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Exactly - there's gotta be a balance. Obviously, you can't get away with a too ridiculously spread out plan that dilutes the whole value of having it in one city (like, say, an San Francisco bid having the bulk of major events in San Jose or Oakland, or, dare I say, a Reno bid with major events in Sacramento), but on the other hand, I agree, I really think there's case that things can be too compact, cause congestion, and limit things to a single "Olympic Park" and not touch the wider city.

I just think people take this "holy writ" that compact plans are the superior plans too far. And I also think they have far less bearing on the eventual decision than is often assumed. As I stated originally, it's a nice marketing tagline, but I can't think really of any city that has been awarded the games for the sole or predominant reason that they a "compact" bid plan.

Once a city makes the short list, I strongly feel it's the "story" rather than the "plan" that wins the race.

Absolutely. The point was never to say the "best bid" is "compact". I was just interested in the overlay of the concepts.

e.g. in Madrid, given the high quality of public transport, for which I can vouch for, a concept like that of Istanbul would not really be an issue, using existing infrastructure for Games Times services.

So what you need to overlay is , the following, but not limited to;

1. The planned, existing, and additional transport infrastructure

2. The risk of each of these infrastructures

3. The development zones of the city

4. The capacity of venues and peak demand in relation to capacities, and distance from the OV

In addition rather than the concept just looking pretty, does it actually fit together.

No point saying it's a "zone" (well to make the shortlist this matters) but the scattered venue in the zone bear no relation, are not served by a "zonal" transport interchange, secruity and other resources...i.e. the whole point of clustering, being compact i.e. logistics, capacity, transport, vibe, atmosphere, costs...

I would encourage a more hands on approach by the IOC.

Requesting that all potential venues and sites be included, in particular existing venues.

A large existing exhibition centre may be "recommended" by the IOC, rather than "later on" in the bid announcing that sports are moving "outside the Olympic Park"

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In 2005 I visited Baku and I was really surprised how vibrant the city is. No slums at all, but many of those awful ex-communist "Osiedles", but infrastructure is decent and can improve even more. But we all know that their Turkic rival is royal Constantinople.

In my point of view, the IOC voters have paid attention to developing countries. Turkey in this case has many chances, their economy, their domestic market grow and it represents the muslim world (not only the arab world as it could be Doha) hosting such event. From Morocco to Indonesia, there will be a lot of consumers purchasing memorabilia and sport gadgets. And diplomatically it may help the situation in the eastern side of the Mediterranean and Middle East.

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What about support in the social network? For instance, Baku 2020 Facebook profile has almost reached 37 000 fans. How is the situation with the other applicant cities?

As of March 29, 2012, 11 am (CET), according to the links on the official websites:

Istanbul 2020

Facebook: 1030 (4th)

Twitter: 176 (5th)

Tokyo 2020

Facebook: 692 (5th)

Twitter: 706 (3rd)

Baku 2020

Facebook: 37005 (1st)

Twitter: 453 (4th)

Doha 2020

Facebook: 1130 (3rd)

Twitter: 1108 (2nd)

Madrid 2020

Facebook: 34710 (2nd)

Twitter: 2901 (1st)

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As of March 29, 2012, 11 am (CET), according to the links on the official websites:

Istanbul 2020

Facebook: 1030 (4th)

Twitter: 176 (5th)

Tokyo 2020

Facebook: 692 (5th)

Twitter: 706 (3rd)

Baku 2020

Facebook: 37005 (1st)

Twitter: 453 (4th)

Doha 2020

Facebook: 1130 (3rd)

Twitter: 1108 (2nd)

Madrid 2020

Facebook: 34710 (2nd)

Twitter: 2901 (1st)

thats surprising baku has 2nd lowest population of them all

youd think tokyo would be higher

WHAT THE HELL! theres a barcleona 2020 fbook group

wait for it

336 000 likes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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