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2020: Who's the Frontrunner?


  

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  1. 1. Who's the frontrunner in the 2020 race so far?



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I don't think so, if they lose 2020, they will bid again for 2024.

"IF" they lose? U mean when they lose.

Lots of places can boast the same things that you're listing, that doesn't automatically mean that they are of Olympic caliber. There's nothing compelling or inspiring for the IOC to go to Baku. Not now, not in the next race, or the one after that. So I could easily see it take "decades", if at all.

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If, as looks likely, Turkey is the only candidate for Euro 2020 I'd find it impossible to believe their government would turn around to UEFA and say "actually, no, we don't want this". That'd be such

I think Turkey saying they want the European Championships and the Olympics will work against them. The IOC is not going to want a big show in town in June and the Olympics in August.

It's impossible for any country to stage the same year two major sport events such as Euro and the Olympic Games (and this has nothing to do with Turkey). It would create major challenges regarding ma

I don't think so, if they lose 2020, they will bid again for 2024.

This time with far more infrastructure in place including:

A completed Olympic Stadium (they say on their website that it will be temporarily be expanded to 80,000 for the games and being what under construction and all this is possible, otherwise, It might be a hard sell for an already completed legacy mode venue to be expanded to 80,000, unless that figure would serve as a legacy capacity).

A fully expanded Expo Center.

White City fully complete minus the villages and MPC.

Various other key venues complete.

Where the 2020 bid would have 2-3 times the hotel capacity already available (than 2016 bid), the 2024 bid should have 3-4 times more.

New airport terminal fully complete and other general transport projects complete/underway.

So I don't think it would be decades, but if Istanbul wins 2020, I doubt that the IOC would really be keen on going to a new frontier for a 3rd time in a row and choose a city from a country which has hosted before (could even be a city which has hosted before).

you think if say tokyo wins 2020 then baku will win 2024? before an american, african another chinese olympics?

yeah i know Doha has a small population but so does Baku its as unheard of as Doha,

I dont think they could get 2024, 28, or even 32

we still are waiting for an african, american and maybe even another asian win

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Baku has a good chance when the city and country became completly known for all the world, i mean even Qatar is being really sounded... That's what Baku needs be a world known city not a Paris or London of course but at least like Warsaw or another East European city... If think that if Baku hosts a UEFA champions league final it will help alot showcasimg the city ;)

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Baku has a good chance when the city and country became completly known for all the world, i mean even Qatar is being really sounded... That's what Baku needs be a world known city not a Paris or London of course but at least like Warsaw or another East European city... If think that if Baku hosts a UEFA champions league final it will help alot showcasimg the city ;)

I have heard we plan for UEFA Champions League final in 2015 or 2016 upon the completion of Olympic Stadium. That is also what was discussed with presidents of FIFA and UEFA during the groundreaking ceremony for Olympic Stadium.

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http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/sport/big-sporting-events-gravitate-to-the-hosts-with-the-most/story-e6frg7t6-1226278780369

Big sporting events gravitate to the hosts with the most

IT'S hard to imagine a more humiliating backdown by one of Italy's leading sporting officials.

Mario Pescante this week gave up his role as a vice-president of the International Olympic Committee out of sheer embarrassment over Rome's last-minute withdrawal as a candidate for the 2020 Olympics.

The 73-year-old Pescante, an MP and a former president of Italy's powerful Olympic committee, CONI, has devoted the past two years to the Games bid.

The embarrassing withdrawal of one of the world's leading sporting nations - and one which in times gone past could have been relied upon to stage a superb Olympics - is another sign of the impact of the shift in world economic power on the sporting arena.

And as the European economic crisis continues to bite, concerns have been raised over whether Spain, battling 20 per cent unemployment, will be a solid candidate.

The power to buy international sporting events is shifting.

And there is a rising concern in world sporting circles about how many events in the near future will go to the wealthy countries of the Middle East, particularly Qatar, where there is plenty of money, but very little in the way of grass-roots interest in sport.

Australia had a taste of the increased capacity of Gulf states to grab major events in December 2010 when FIFA awarded the 2022 soccer World Cup to Qatar.

Qatar, which will have to build airconditioned stadiums to host the cup because of its searing heat, beat bids from Australia, the US, South Korea and Japan, all of which, it could be argued, have much longer sporting traditions.

Qatar has a population of about two million, most of them guest workers and expatriates from countries such as India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, The Philippines and other Arab countries. Only a small number - about 300,000 - are natives. But the country has the honour of having the highest per-capita wealth of any in the world. Its successful bid to host the 2022 World Cup followed its staging of the 2006 Asian Games in Doha.

And now it is backing up with a bid for the 2020 Olympics.

Allegations of corruption within FIFA followed the bidding process for the 2022 World Cup.

How much influence did the wealth of Qatar have in winning the bid? And what did that mean for other countries that did not have access to petrodollars to promise a gold-plated event?

Then again, why shouldn't the Middle East take advantage of its oil and gas wealth to host major sporting events?

In awarding a Games or a major sporting event, the sporting body itself is entitled to consider the economic capacity of the bidding country.

The IOC will no doubt be pleased that the 2016 Olympics will be held in Brazil, a mineral-rich country like Australia that has benefitted from the China economic boom.

In assessing the bids for the 2020 Games, IOC members will have to weigh up the undoubted capacity of Qatar to pay for the Games against bids by other countries with weaker economies.

But it also needs to weigh up the true sporting impact of the Games and the attraction of the country for athletes, sponsors and fans.

The International Amateur Athletics Federation faced this situation last November when Doha bid for the right to host the World Athletics Championships in 2017 against London, the host of this year's Olympics.

Qatar offered to pay the pound stg. 5 million in prize-money for the Games and threw in another pound stg. 18m in sponsorship.

London, which will already has the facilities from the 2012 Games, matched its bid for the prize-money and also argued that the IAAF would be able to raise a record amount of commercial sponsorship if the championships were held on its turf. It also pointed out that having the event in Britain would mean sellout crowds of knowledgeable sports lovers, happier athletes, a mature commercial market and a much better climate for all concerned.

To tip the scales, the bid leader, Sebastian Coe, who is also heading up the London Olympics, had to promise that the athletic track would be retained in the Olympic stadium as a long-term legacy for track and field in Britain.

Qatar's critics also pointed out that the country has been buying local sporting talent by offering to support poor young African athletes, giving them a "sport passport" to compete for the country.

No doubt the controversy over the question of corruption around the contest for the 2022 soccer World Cup might have also weighed on IAAF officials as they made their decision.

One person who may well be a candidate for IOC vice-president in the future is one of Australia's most powerful sporting officials, IOC member John Coates. Pescante's decision to step down from the post of vice-president two years earlier than he had expected will shorten the queue.

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I have heard we plan for UEFA Champions League final in 2015 or 2016 upon the completion of Olympic Stadium. That is also what was discussed with presidents of FIFA and UEFA during the groundreaking ceremony for Olympic Stadium.

There is no way Azerbaijan will be given a Champions League final. FIrst qualify a team and then bid.

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It's possible... Platinni is odd... He may want to give the UCL Final or the Europa League to Baku just to sound intresting... Cuz there are always the same hosts England, Germany, Spain, Italy, Paris-Saint Dennis and always a new "frontier" Istanbul, Moscow... There Baku might have a chance

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I think the Istanbul bid is under-estimated at people's peril.

They've undoubtedly learnt from previous lessons.

Unlike the other two leading bidders; Tokyo and Madrid, they've got something physical to show the inspectors.

The Ataturk Olympic Stadium 75,000+

The Ulker Sports Arena 13,800+

Turk Telecom Arena 52,000

Sinam Erden Dome 16,000 - 22,000

Atakoy Athletics Arena 7,450

The Turks have also held Champions League finals, International Basketball Tournaments, the 2012 IAAF World Indoor Athletics Championships and have shown they are more than prepared to put their money where their mouth is putting billions into infrastructure projects.

As the first Olympics in a secular Muslim country able to cope with millions of tourists, it makes for a strong candidate

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It's possible... Platinni is odd... He may want to give the UCL Final or the Europa League to Baku just to sound intresting... Cuz there are always the same hosts England, Germany, Spain, Italy, Paris-Saint Dennis and always a new "frontier" Istanbul, Moscow... There Baku might have a chance

Difference being Russia and Turkey qualified club teams, Azerbaijan has not.

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I think the Istanbul bid is under-estimated at people's peril.

They've undoubtedly learnt from previous lessons.

Unlike the other two leading bidders; Tokyo and Madrid, they've got something physical to show the inspectors.

The Ataturk Olympic Stadium 75,000+

The Ulker Sports Arena 13,800+

Turk Telecom Arena 52,000

Sinam Erden Dome 16,000 - 22,000

Atakoy Athletics Arena 7,450

Madrid:

Santiago Bernabéu Stadium 80,925

Telefónica Arena Madrid 10,500

Caja Mágica 12,442/3,500/2,500

Under construction Aquatic Centre 16,500/5,200

Hipódromo de la Zarzuela 17,000

Under expansion Estadio de Madrid 65,000

Palacio de Deportes de la Comunidad de Madrid 14,500

all football venues

...

Tokyocan also offer morer than Istanbul with both, Madrid and Tokyo, with good and compact concepts. E.g. Tokyo 2020 proposes almost all venues within an 8km-radius. In Istanbul it's more than 40min. between the Olympic Stadium and Ülker Sports Arena.

3 previous bids didn't seem to teach them much for 2012 (their 4th).

And I think they also haven't learnt too much after 2012. Yes, international PR campaigns haven't started yet, but you could convince your population of your concept right now and this might be quite important for Istanbul, since I think that many have to be persuaded after the recent results (last, not shortlisted, penultimate and not shortlisted).

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So Madrid's bid is looking like it will definitely be going down the drain for a third time. I am about to jump to a major conclusion here so stay with me. Gamesbids just reported that "(SOC) was informed by the Swedish government Friday that financial guarantees would not be provided for an Ostersund 2022 Winter Olympic Games</span> bid." Why does a failed Swedish bid have anything to do with Madrid. Well if the Swedes can't guarantee government support for a winter games then I don't know who in Europe can for a Summer, even if their government believes they can.

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Not that I think Madrid will win, but thats neither here nor there. Its not that the Swedes "can't" give the financial guarantees, it's simply that they WON'T. You're reading way too much into it.

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Madrid:

Santiago Bernabéu Stadium 80,925

Telefónica Arena Madrid 10,500

Caja Mágica 12,442/3,500/2,500

Under construction Aquatic Centre 16,500/5,200

Hipódromo de la Zarzuela 17,000

Under expansion Estadio de Madrid 65,000

Palacio de Deportes de la Comunidad de Madrid 14,500

all football venues

...

Tokyocan also offer morer than Istanbul with both, Madrid and Tokyo, with good and compact concepts. E.g. Tokyo 2020 proposes almost all venues within an 8km-radius. In Istanbul it's more than 40min. between the Olympic Stadium and Ülker Sports Arena.

And I think they also haven't learnt too much after 2012. Yes, international PR campaigns haven't started yet, but you could convince your population of your concept right now and this might be quite important for Istanbul, since I think that many have to be persuaded after the recent results (last, not shortlisted, penultimate and not shortlisted).

Very interesting

At the Athletics stadium?

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Well, the Swiss shouldn't even bother bidding. I don't think it can be connected to Madrid's bid though. They are two separate countries for two separate games.

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Well, Madrid is starting to become like Detroit in the last century. It bids for the chance to host the Olympic Games, only to be outdone by other cities within the said country. I am surprised that Barcelona may put forward a bid for the 2022 WINTER Olympics. Does Spain have that kind of money to do that AND have Madrid as a possible candidate city for 2020 at the same time? But, like the Energizer bunny, some cities just keep on bidding for that chance.

Anyway, my two main choices here are Madrid and Istanbul. I think the both cities will be candidate cities in May, when the IOC announces it at the SportAccord Convention in Quebec City.

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This is a 2.5 horse race: Tokyo and Istanbul, with Madrid and Doha offering somewhat plausible bids.

Madrid's issue is financila: it's a fiscal basket case. Doha will have a bid lacking only two elements: climate and timing that will inspire IOC members to vote.

Tokyo has a great bid at the wrong time. Earthquakes, tsunami, nuclear fallout: the government of Japan should be focussed on rebuilding the lives of its citizens up North--not hosting a sports party in the capital.

Istanbul has a very good bid. They can afford it. They offer a metaphoric bridge between East and West, Christendom and Islam. And are a secular, popular, stable government. Human rights issues abound, but less than Russia or China.

If Istanbul tweaks a few things they will be the ones to beat. If they don't, they might still get the Games. But only if they follow Rio's and Pyeonchang's strategy: skip the "it's our turn" and message "we're ready on merit".

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