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TOKYO 2020 Venue Plan

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That is a very "epidermal" view, we are ( at least I am) probing "bone structure" here. In a preservation of what Grice termed "Face" and what Brown and Levinson (1978, 1987) elaborated on, people will "show" what they want to be seen as a means of "saving face". "Showing" in the context of the 2022 WOG race means "saying". There is something explicitly said, that is done to derail suspicion of what is the truth. This is a strategy ALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL humans use individually and in groups as sophisticated as corporations. Clearly, the 2022 race must be evaluated not only by Oslo's withdrawal and their claims for doing so, but also in the context of the withdrawal of all the other potential bidders save Almaty. I suggest that the MONEY which each bidder was putting forward had already scared some bidders stiff. One up from that was the realisation that Beijing has shown ( rather epically in 2008) that money wasn't an issue. That's when being scared stiff became actualized as "run like hell". And I do take your poing that this is the Tokyo thread.

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No decision expected on Tokyo 2020 cycling venues until September

Deliberations over some Tokyo 2020 cycling venues are set to drag on until at least September, as a mutually acceptable venue plan covering the track, BMX and mountain bike disciplines continues to prove difficult to pin down.

insidethegames understands that a recent visit to the International Cycling Union (UCI)’s Swiss headquarters by members of the Tokyo 2020 sports department, though productive, failed to achieve agreement.

The deadline for a solution - originally set for this week’s International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive Board meeting in Malaysia - has accordingly been extended.

The earliest at which a new blueprint is likely to emerge is now said to be a UCI meeting in late September.

The UCI is staging a last-ditch battle to avoid being dispatched to Izu, a location where there is already a velodrome, but which is 130 kilometres away from central Tokyo.

This venue would require something like $50 million (£33 million/€45 million) of work to get it ready for the Games, mainly adding spectator capacity.

But an IOC source has intimated that the cost would be paid by the keirin community.

The UCI contends it is simply too far away, has too small a capacity and would offer an unsatisfactory spectator experience if capacity were increased to an acceptable level.

"We have had a detailed review of proposals to change and will hopefully be in a decision to make a decision in the next few weeks," UCI President Brian Cookson told insidethegames today.

The main alternatives to the velodrome at Izu are understood to be Hachioji City, close to the location of some Tokyo 1964 cycling events, around 50km west of central Tokyo, or for a temporary track or velodrome to be erected at an existing sporting facility, or even a car-park, as close as feasible to the Olympic Village.

As for BMX and mountain bike, the UCI would like to stick with proposals outlined in Tokyo 2020’s original bid book - that is to say Ariake North in central Tokyo for BMX and Sea Forest South in Tokyo Bay for mountain bike.

Alternatives for BMX could include Dream Island or the Makuhari Messe convention centre east of Tokyo that is now hosting fencing, taekwondo and wrestling.

Cycling is the last sport other than football and whatever new sports find their way onto the Olympic programme whose Tokyo 2020 venues remain under review following changes to the original blueprint that have produced savings of $1.7 billion (£1.1 billion/€1.5 billion) by making greater use of pre-existing and further-flung facilities.

The original Tokyo 2020 plan called for use of a temporary velodrome.

http://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1029054/no-decision-expected-on-tokyo-2020-cycling-venues-until-september

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I like how their bid and actual Olympics logo very much represents their Olympics. From nice, flowery, colourful to coporate-like, gloomy and colourless...

It will probably be the Olympics with the most difference between their bid and the actual Games. Can't wait to see what the 2020 Games will be like (cause as of now, I have NO idea how it will be.....)

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A lot of venues are (still) on the waterfront, and it'll surely be hot. You'll get a nice atmosphere from that, I think.

Personally I think it's up to the Look of the Games and the venue designs. They can really change the atmosphere from happy to sad with color alone.

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Tokyo 2020 could use temporary canoe slalom venue claims Estanguet

International Canoe Federation (ICF) vice president Tony Estanguet has revealed the governing body are working to create temporary slalom venues which could be used at multi-sport Games, and confirmed it is an option for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) member is the co-President for Paris' bid for the 2024 Games and believes that giving bidding cities the option of using either permanent or temporary venues would make events more sustainable.

It could also avoid a repeat of the aftermath of Athens 2004, which saw the canoeing venue in the Greek capital closed after the Games.

“I am very concerned about the sustainability of the Games," said Estanguet, a three-time Olympic C1 champion for France.

"I feel this is also the responsibility of International Federations to support the bid cities and make sure they propose a sustainable plan.

“It is good to have a concept that allows you to be in the best position in the city, for instance in Paris at the moment we have some nice places to celebrate the Games, but also we know after the Games those places have to be maintained for the city.

“In terms of legacy, you can choose to reuse it or if you really do not want to keep it you can have this temporary venue and put it in another place.

“It could happen with Paris and maybe Tokyo, who we have started a discussion with about this concept.

"It is our role as an International Federation to put the option on the table.”

Tokyo 2020’s canoe slalom course had initially been due to be constructed in Kasai Rinkai Park, but it was subject to protests from environmental protesters who claimed it would damage the area.

It has now been moved outside of the Park to reduce the cost of the facility, as part of a raft of changes to the Games' venue plans which were designed to save around $1 billion (£650 million/€890 million).

Creating a permanent canoe slalom venue has often proved to be one of the most expensive facilities required for the Olympics with the Lee Valley White Water Centre, which hosted competition at London 2012, costing around £31 million ($47 million/€43 million) to build.

However, Estanguet explained the cost could be dramatically reduced if the concept of a temporary venue comes to fruition, but should the bidding cities produce a sustainable development plan permanent facilities would also be welcomed by the ICF.

“Our role at the ICF is to develop a new concept of venue to reduce the cost of investment needed,” said the 37-year-old.

“The first company we worked with, we proposed under €10 million (£7.2 million/$10.9 million) to build this venue and said ‘if it is over 10 million I am not interested’.

“For them it is really possible because what is costing the most at the moment is for a permanent venue to be able to cope with conditions over time.”

Estanguet is hopeful that by developing a low cost option the sport would be able to feature at more multi-sport events, and stated the ICF would work alongside the yet to be announced hosts of the second edition of the European Games in 2019.

http://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1031290/exclusive-tokyo-2020-could-use-temporary-canoe-slalom-facility-claims-estanguet

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UCI's Cookson expects agreement soon on move of Olympic cycling outside Tokyo

LONDON (AP) — After months of negotiations, the UCI is nearing final agreement with Olympic organizers on their proposal to move cycling events at the 2020 Tokyo Games to a venue outside the capital to save money.

Brian Cookson, president of cycling's governing body, told The Associated Press that the UCI stands ready to accept the change but is looking for certain "assurances" to "minimize" the impact of moving events so far from the host city.

"I'm optimistic we will have a solution within the next couple of weeks," he said.

Track cycling, mountain biking and BMX were originally set to be held in Tokyo, but organizers decided to move the venue to Izu — more than two hours from the host city by train — as part of a series of cost-cutting changes.

The UCI opposed the move, saying it would diminish the Olympic experience for athletes and fans.

But, after protracted talks with Japanese organizers and the IOC, the cycling body has softened its position.

"We have a better understanding now of what's possible and what's not possible," Cookson said. "We still want to have one or two assurances about the changes that are proposed, the impact that will have on the cycling events and the success of the cycling events.

"I don't want to say too much more until we agree on the final details, but we will inevitably have to accept that there will be some changes to the venues and we are just making sure that we minimize any negative aspects of that," he added in an interview on the sidelines of Olympic meetings in Washington last week.

Izu has an existing indoor velodrome for track cycling, but the venue may need upgrading and extra seating for the Olympics.

"It's no secret that the big issue was moving the track events out to Izu," Cookson said. "It's a long way from central Tokyo to Izu and we need to make sure the impact of that is minimized if that's the only available solution. The discussions are still around that."

Cookson held talks recently with Tokyo organizers as well as IOC President Thomas Bach and IOC Vice President John Coates, who heads the coordination commission for the 2020 Games.

Cycling is the last major piece of Tokyo's venue plan that still needs to be finalized. Previous deadlines on reaching a solution have come and gone.

The original venue plan for cycling had the events in the so-called Tokyo Bay Zone on the waterfront.

"I think we are being asked to accept the biggest changes of any sport on the program and we have a responsibility to make sure those changes don't negatively impact on our sport too much," Cookson said.

Tokyo's original plan was for 28 of the venues to be located within an 8-kilometer (5-mile) radius of the Olympic Village.

Several sports have already been moved to surrounding prefectures. Organizers say the moves have saved $1.7 billion, in line with the IOC's "Olympic Agenda 2020" efforts to hold down costs by making maximum use of existing or temporary facilities.

Basketball will now take place at Saitama Super Arena, about an hour outside Tokyo. Fencing, taekwondo and wrestling have been moved to Makuhari Messe, a large convention center in Chiba prefecture, also about an hour from Tokyo.

AP

http://www.usnews.com/news/sports/articles/2015/11/04/uci-close-to-agreement-on-tokyo-olympic-venue-move

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IOC Executive Board approves four more Tokyo venues

09/12/2015

The International Olympic Committee (IOC)’s Executive Board (EB) has today confirmed the venue locations for the cycling events at Tokyo 2020, following close consultation between the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee and the IOC.

The finalisation of these venues marks another major step in the venue master plan review undertaken by Tokyo 2020, which followed the recommendations of the IOC’s Evaluation Commission and the unanimous approval by the IOC Members of Olympic Agenda 2020.

Designed to deliver an unforgettable experience for riders and fans, and significant post-Games benefits for cycling in Japan, the venue master plan has been mapped out in line with Olympic Agenda 2020 – placing a focus on cost effectiveness, sustainability and legacy – and Tokyo 2020’s Games’ vision. The venues to be used for cycling in 2020 will be:

• The Road Races and Time Trials will take place in the city of Tokyo, starting and finishing at the iconic Imperial Palace Garden, and showcasing Tokyo’s stunning backdrops.

• The BMX events will take place at a purpose-built temporary facility at Ariake in the centre of Tokyo with 5,000 seats.

• The Track cycling events will take place at the Japan Cycle Sport Centre in Izu, in the Shizuoka Prefecture, approximately 120km from Tokyo. The existing velodrome will undergo significant refurbishment, and the seating capacity will be increased.

• The Mountain Bike events will take place at the Japan Cycle Sport Centre in Izu on an existing course, adjacent to the velodrome, which will be newly renovated to meet the Olympic standard. The course will feature the spectacular Mount Fuji as a backdrop.

This decision is expected to result in savings of approximately JPY 10 billion (USD 100 million) from the revised Tokyo 2020 construction budget. This means that the overall saving is now expected to be approximately JPY 180 billion (USD 1.8 billion) in savings from the revised construction budget.

The athlete experience will be guaranteed, as all athletes and team officials whose events will be at Izu will have the option to stay in the main Athletes’ Village before and after their competition. During the competitions, they will stay at a satellite village located close to the event venues.

As part of a wider showcasing and legacy plan for the sport, the Japanese Cycling Federation and local authorities have committed to reinforcing their support for the Japan Cycle Sports Centre, with the aim of establishing a comprehensive multi-support cycling centre. The Japanese Cycling Federation, along with the Izu City municipal authorities, the Japanese Keirin Association and related stakeholders, have also committed to provide on-going support for national cycling academy programmes.

The venue master plan review has been carried out by Tokyo 2020 and the International Federations in the spirit of Olympic Agenda 2020, which encourages host cities to use existing and temporary venues where possible in order to reduce costs, and following Tokyo 2020’s “athletes first” concept. The approved venue moves will make sure that the athletes have a great Games experience, while reducing venue costs and engaging the population of Greater Tokyo and Japan much more in the staging of the Games.

IOC

http://www.olympic.org/news/ioc-executive-board-approves-four-more-tokyo-venues/247604

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Probably old news but I see fencing, taekwondo, and wrestling have been relocated from Tokyo Big Sight to Makahuri Messe Convention Center outside of Tokyo and Tokyo Big Sight will be used only for the IBC and MPC. Seems rather puzzling? Tokyo Big Sight is quite a large convention center. Is it not capable of holding the aforementioned sports and the IBC and MPC? The Georgia World Congress Center didn't have that problem in Atlanta although that was in 1996.

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I think I read a while ago that there was some structural problem or something. There must have been issues building temporary seating inside the halls or something.

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Tokyo 2020 Gymnastic Centre will no longer be temporary venue

The Olympic Gymnastic Centre at Tokyo 2020 will no longer be a temporary venue, organisers have announced.

Following a review in the Japanese capital, the facility will remain for a further ten years and become a convention and exhibition centre.

According to Tokyo 2020 spokesman Hikariko Ono, the decision has been made to "maximise legacy" with Tokyo in need of such a venue.

"This change will have no impact on Tokyo 2020’s athletes-first commitment for the development of the venue," he said.

"The Olympic Gymnastic Centre will be an innovative and iconic venue situated in an excellent location in the Tokyo bay area.

"It will have a total site area of 100,000 metres squared and a seating capacity for 12,000 spectators."

The venue will also stage boccia at the Paralympics with tender for construction due to be launched this Autumn.

Organisers hope that it will be finished in 2019, with the building heavily featuring wood.

This is to ensure sustainability and to provide a distinctive Japanese style, it is claimed.

...

http://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1035701/tokyo-2020-gymnastic-centre-will-no-longer-be-temporary-venue

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How can wooden structures be "friendlier to the environment"? I mean, Japan isn't exactly a heavily wooded country w/ a rain forest. They will probably be importing a lot of the wood from China, Thailand, Canada and Brazil. So great patches of forests in those countries will be denuded in order to fill Tokyo 2020's construction orders? Huh? I mean Brazil's rosewood trees usually fill orders for the very best permanent velodromes in the world.

The wood will then be treated with a LOT OF CHEMICALS to make them fire-retardant. So, how is all that "friendlier to the environment" vs. mixing and setting concrete? It's another sugar-coated, white-washed Olympic lie!!

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How can wooden structures be "friendlier to the environment"? I mean, Japan isn't exactly a heavily wooded country w/ a rain forest. They will probably be importing a lot of the wood from China, Thailand, Canada and Brazil. So great patches of forests in those countries will be denuded in order to fill Tokyo 2020's construction orders? Huh? I mean Brazil's rosewood trees usually fill orders for the very best permanent velodromes in the world.

The wood will then be treated with a LOT OF CHEMICALS to make them fire-retardant. So, how is all that "friendlier to the environment" vs. mixing and setting concrete? It's another sugar-coated, white-washed Olympic lie!!

Actually the USA and Canada are their largest suppliers (mostly Douglas Fir from the Pacific Northwest) and by environmentally friendly I assume they mean by carbon footprint.

Utilizing forests for wood production is a pretty reasonable use. (As long as it is cluster cut instead of clear cut.) The loss of rainforests is more due to slash and burn agriculture rather than sustainable forestry. Even as an environmental scientist myself I am only angry at the way they cut down trees here (clear cutting one side of a mountain and leaving the other half untouched) before shipping them do Japan.

In fact cutting down pockets of trees within a forest is good for the environment. It increases the species diversity of plants and increases food available for browsers like deer. That's why Native Americans used to intentionally start forest fires: to clear out some land in the forest for grasses and other foliage for deer to browse on. Beavers used to do this too (with dams rather than fire, obviously) but they are pretty isolated now.

And that's probably more than you ever wanted to know about the topic of forestry management. Sorry.

Edited by Nacre
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Actually the USA and Canada are their largest suppliers (mostly Douglas Fir from the Pacific Northwest) and by environmentally friendly I assume they mean by carbon footprint.

Utilizing forests for wood production is a pretty reasonable use. (As long as it is cluster cut instead of clear cut.) The loss of rainforests is more due to slash and burn agriculture rather than sustainable forestry. Even as an environmental scientist myself I am only angry at the way they cut down trees here (clear cutting one side of a mountain and leaving the other half untouched) before shipping them do Japan.

In fact cutting down pockets of trees within a forest is good for the environment. It increases the species diversity of plants and increases food available for browsers like deer. That's why Native Americans used to intentionally start forest fires: to clear out some land in the forest for grasses and other foliage for deer to browse on. Beavers used to do this too (with dams rather than fire, obviously) but they are pretty isolated now.

And that's probably more than you ever wanted to know about the topic of forestry management. Sorry.

Oh OK. Good to know. But that still didn't address the issue of chemically treating all that wood. I mean, would that be worse or better than having built concret stadia. It just makes sense to have lighter materials in earthquake-belt Japan. But I imagine, the guts of the new stadia will still be concrete and steel; and just the cladding and finish will be wood??

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Here's a new render for the Olympic Village. The tall towers won't be built until after the games.

Olympic Village baseline design on Harumi Island.

http://www.metro.tokyo.jp/INET/KEIKA...3/70q3v100.htm
http://www.metro.tokyo.jp/INET/KEIKA...A/70q3v100.pdf


Start of construction: January 2017
Scheduled completion date: December 2019

After the games the buildings will become normal residential apartments. Completion of the post games rework, including the 2 tallest towers that will be built after the games is scheduled for 2024.

Total mumber of apartments: 5,650
Floor count: 15 to 18.

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1658211&page=11

3UJQUZH.jpg

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I was on twitter and found some construction photos for the Musashino Forest Sports Center which is located right next to Ajinomoto Stadium. It'll host badminton and fencing during the modern pentathlon. It appears that the rest of the modern pentathlon will take place in the stadium, but unless there is a pool there already that I'm not aware of I assume that the swimming portion will take place on the building rendered on the far left.


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EDIT: I found a render on the interior and blueprints that have been around for a little bit.


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I was watching the olympic trials for gymnastics and it still baffles me how timeless Yoyogi is. Even today it looks as if it were built a year ago.

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I saw a SHINee concert in Yoyogi a couple of years back and apart from needing some new seats (a few were... flimsy) and maybe an update in the toilets (quite old) - the venue was in really great condition.

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Here are the renders/plans for the Field Hockey Stadium, Canoe Slalom Course, and the Ariake Coliseum.

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