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deawebo

Doha's chances

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If Doha wins the IAAF world championships bid, i think it will boost their SOG bid. What do you think?

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I wonder what Doha's chances are now they've lost 2017 and been rejected by the IAAF despite a huge financial offer from them to host the event?

Have they had a big dent or in the grand scheme of things doesn't it make much difference (having already hosted a Asian Games and being trusted with a World Cup)?

Does this technical faux pas in Monaco reveal more than the voting numbers with regard to Doha's chances:

From Simon Hart in Monaco: 'Reporters are not allowed in the IAAF council room but are following events by live video feed. This has just caused a few red faces among IAAF officials because journalists started to receive an audio feed of IAAF senior vice-president Bob Hersh giving his evaluation report of the two bids, which was not meant to be for public consumption. Encouragingly for London, he raised the issue of athletics crowds in Doha emptying the stadium long before the end of the meeting, as happened at this season's Diamond League event. Alas, the audio then snapped off.'

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I wonder what Doha's chances are now they've lost 2017 and been rejected by the IAAF despite a huge financial offer from them to host the event?

Have they had a big dent or in the grand scheme of things doesn't it make much difference (having already hosted a Asian Games and being trusted with a World Cup)?

Does this technical faux pas in Monaco reveal more than the voting numbers with regard to Doha's chances:

Actually, I think not winning boosts their bid. A doha's win today will be the end of any 2020 dream. Cuz it will be another win on Qatar's strategy.

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I don't think Doha's loss here will affect its 2020 bid. It will always have its core supporters. The thing is, amongst 110-115 people, I don't think there are enuf to think that Doha would make a suitable host.

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IOC happy 2017 World Championships is heading to London as Doha's Olympic bid has yet to convince

International Olympic Committee executives were among those relieved at London’s victory over Doha in last week’s 2017 World Athletics Championships vote.

The Lausanne-based organisation is deeply uneasy at Doha’s bid for the 2020 Olympics, which is expected to be a money-no-object operation on a par with the successful 2022 World Cup campaign.

A Doha victory would have given Qatar an endorsement from the Olympics' biggest sport and limited the IOC’s options when it considers whether to short-list the bid next May.

The IOC has put Doha on notice that it has concerns over climate and scheduling. Qatar wants to host the Games in late September and October to avoid the most savage Gulf conditions.

The IOC is not yet convinced either that it will be cool enough, or that it wants to risk a scheduling clash with European football and major American sports.

There is concern too about the reputational issues that choosing Doha would bring to the IOC, which has watched the fallout for Fifa with a shudder.

Despite these concerns and the blow of defeat in Monaco last week, Doha may yet be boosted by uncertainty among rival bidders.

Rome’s bid has become much harder as a result of the deepening Eurozone crisis, and Madrid is not immune from the same concerns.

Tokyo is recovering from its own natural disasters, leaving Istanbul, a compelling choice in theory but facing logistical challenges.

But the IOC’s position is complicated by the fact that, of five IOC members on the IAAF council, at least three of them, including Lord Coe’s rival for the IAAF presidency Sergei Bubka, are thought to have voted for Doha.

The Telegraph

Interesting artcile - though I would have liked a few more concrete sources to back up the claikms about IOC "unease" over Doha.

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There are three main weak points of Doha 2020 Bid:

1. The weather and timing. I guess few people like to watch Olympics in late Autumn;

2. The WOG will be in South Korea, so two asian cities in a raw? I don't believe it;

3. Qatar will host WC 2022 so this alone sounds to be pretty much for a small country.

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See that's what I was talking about... Doha's loose was better for their bid!

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The heavy criticism over FIFA for choosing Qatar killed the chances of Doha. The IOC finds himself more righteous than FIFA and its members will want to keep this. They will think: let's not make the same mistake of FIFA shall we? Not that I think the choice of Qatar is so absurd. In all elections of major events exists buying of votes.

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There are three main weak points of Doha 2020 Bid:

1. The weather and timing. I guess few people like to watch Olympics in late Autumn;

2. The WOG will be in South Korea, so two asian cities in a raw? I don't believe it;

3. Qatar will host WC 2022 so this alone sounds to be pretty much for a small country.

These are not the only drawbacks.

What about human rights violations? The treatment of women? The total lack of any meaningful sports tradition? The lack of spectators? The fact that the Qataris would reduce the Games to nothing more than a status symbol?

PC is a non-issue. Not only will Asia host back-to-back Games at some point, the Middle East is still a great contrast to Korea.

Very interesting story, Rols. I agree that the citing of sources is a a bit thin, but it the article appears more or less plausible. The story does seem dismissive of Tokyo, however, which doesn't feel right to me.

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These are not the only drawbacks.

What about The treatment of women?

Whats wrong with treatment of women !? Please tell me right now what problems in terms of women treatment does Qatar have. I don't understand the general thought that Qatar has this seemingly barbaric discrimination against women.

Qatari women have many career opporunities, including leadership positions, in education, banking, charitable projects, health and human services, tourism, law, civil service and even diplomacy. Women play various roles in the field of Education, Health, Legal, Journalism, Aviation, Banking, Politics, Finance, and Tourism. 36%-42% of Qatari women are in the workforce and experts say women are moving forward with more rights.

In 1999, Qatar came to allow women to legally vote and gain senior positions in government, either by being appointed or elected. Women and men are expected to dress in a manner that is modest and not provoactive, but the dress code is generally driven by social customs and is more relaxed in comparison to other nations in the region.

Qatar is a Muslim-majority nation, with 76% of its population adhering to Islam.[17] The government uses Sunni law as the basis of its criminal and civil regulations. However, some measure of religious toleration is granted. Foreign workers, and tourists, are free to affiliate with other faiths, i.e. Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, and Bahá'ís, as long as they are discrete and do not offend public order or morality.

For example, in March 2008 the Roman Catholic church “Our Lady of the Rosary” was consecrated in Doha. However, in keeping with the need to be discreet, no missionaries are allowed and the church will not have any bells, crosses or other overtly Christian signs on its premises.

Sheikha Moza Al-Misnad

SHEIKHA-MOZAH.fashion.jpg

Her Highness Sheikha Mozah bint Nazzer Al-Missnad is the Chairperson of Qatar foundation (She was a driving force behind Education City and Al Jazeera Children's Channel), Chairperson of the Arab Democracy Foundation and was UNESCO's Special Envoy for Basic and Higher Education in 2003. She was the first GCC monarchical wife to be on TV. Sheikha Mozah has been a high-profile figure in her nation's politics and society, actively involved in Qatar's government, she has been named as one of Forbes' 100 Most Powerful Women at #74.

Qatar University

2_195550_1_248.jpg

Women make up approximately 70% of the student population, and are provided their own set of facilities and classrooms. The president of the university is a women (DR. Sheikha Abdulla Al-Misnad)she has been a selected member of the United Nations University Council (UNU). Professor Al-Misnad’s long and illustrious record in education has gained her a wide and esteemed reputation not only in Qatar.

Her Excellency Al-Mayassa bint Hamad Al-Thani

Sheikha-Al-Mayassa-bint-Hamad-bin-Khalifa-Al-Thani-qatarisbooming.com_.jpg

Sheikha Al-Mayassa currently serves as the Chair of the Qatari Foundation Reach Out To Asia (ROTA), a philanthropic effort inspired by the desire to help the victims of recent natural disasters in Asia. She also serves as the Chair of the Qatari National Foundation of Museums and the Council of Trustees of Qatar Museums Authority (QMA). and as an Assistant to the Chief of Staff of Qatar’s Emiri Diwan. Further, she is Director of Fitch Qatar since 2006.

Her Excellency Sheikha Hind bint Hamad Al-Thani

Hind+Al+Thani+March+2008+Damascus.jpg

Sheikha Yousuf Hasan Al Jufairi

Shushan3_1.jpg

Sheikha Yousuf Hasan Al Jufairi made history in 2003 when she won election to the Central Municipal Council in Qatar from the Airport constituency, the first woman in the GCC ever to win a municipal election, is against reservation of seats for women in the Central Municipal Council

Sheikha al Jufairi has retained her seat in the Central Municipal Council for the third time in a row by defeating her nearest rival in the Airport constituency in 2011 polls. By bagging almost 95 percent of the total 871 votes polled, she won her seat by the highest margin among all the winners in 29 constituencies. She secured 806 votes while her lone rival Fatima al Maliki got just 62 with three votes being declared invalid. al Jufairi is keen to run for the post of vice-president of the Central Municipal Council.

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What about the fact that there are no female athletes? The fact that female tourists are required to cover as much of their bodies as possible? The fact that police rarely investigate reports of violence against women? The fact that spousal abuse is almost never acknowledged as a legitimate concern?

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What about the fact that there are no female athletes? The fact that female tourists are required to cover as much of their bodies as possible? The fact that police rarely investigate reports of violence against women? The fact that spousal abuse is almost never acknowledged as a legitimate concern?

http://www.insidethegames.biz/summer-olympics/2012/9939-qatar-set-to-bow-to-ioc-pressure-and-send-women-to-london-2012

Qatar are hoping to send 4 female olympians to the 2012 olympics.

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4 female athletes in their entire Olympic history -- and only after the IOC twisted their arm. Not something to be especially proud of. Certainly not a statistic worthy of an Olympic host.

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wow being proud of the emirs wife cause she is a woman...:/ no politicians, no artists not athletes but the wife of emir...

:)

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What about the fact that there are no female athletes? The fact that female tourists are required to cover as much of their bodies as possible? The fact that police rarely investigate reports of violence against women? The fact that spousal abuse is almost never acknowledged as a legitimate concern?

Instead of just choking up complete bull****, try actually stating some fact with PROOF and SOURCES. :rolleyes:

40% of the Qatari Delegation that participated at the 2010 Asian Games were female.

At the Youth Olympics in 2010, Qatar sent 2 female athletes as part of the delegation.

Qatar Womens Sport Committee

For example for swimming this is their strategy:

pic36.jpg

Grassroots: 24

Sub-Juniors:5

1- Swimming tanning for girls and graduation of swimmer every 3 months.

2- Holding the one day festivals

3- Selecting the outstanding swimmers to join them to the National team.

Shaden Wohdan, A Qatari gymnastic athlete.

shaden%201.jpg

6505065445_80e9c37456_z.jpg

Nada Zeidan, A Qatari Archer.

Nada-Zeidan1.jpg

Female tourists are not banned from wearing what they want they are just simply "encouraged" to dress modestly to please the locals, other than that they arent really required to stick to any certain dress code, they could be in bikinis at the beach (like any normal beach !?)

We are hosting the Doha Tribeca Film Festival on an annual basis,

salma-hayek-doha-film-festival-qatar.jpg

2009+Doha+Tribeca+Film+Festival+Day+3+TEp_KKtVe-Dl.jpg

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Launched in December 2007 under the auspices of her Highness Sheikha Mozah Bint Nasser Al Misnad, the Qatar Business Women Awards (QBWA) 2010/2011 identified and paid tribute to Qatari women who have contributed to Qatari society and economy through significant professional or entrepreneurial achievements. The award focused on women who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and managerial qualities in their fields.

Commercialbank-supports-Empowerment-of-Women-at-the-Qatar-Business-Women-Awards-qatarisbooming.com_.jpg

Where are you getting your assumptions from !? seriously :blink:

We have the supreme council for family affairs to take care of these issues. http://www.scfa.gov.qa/ Not to mention the Qatar foundation for child and women protection.

Working Women and Discrimination in Qatar

Do women face sexism and discrimination in Qatar?

I've recently been working on a new page for the website, Working Women in Qatar, and while I was doing it I decided to ask a few women if they felt they were at a disadvantage here.

The first lady I asked, who was an Indonesian girl, worked as a secretary in a workshop in the Industrial area, and didn't feel she had received any discrimination based on sex.

Next I spoke to a business woman. Interestingly, she felt that while she had felt some sexism, it had all come from either Western expatriates ("who have been here too long") or from shop workers. Her feelings were echoed by a British teacher I spoke too, although she added that it was nothing she couldn't deal with.

I also spoke to an American-Arab. She felt that a much bigger problem than sexism was discrimination on the basis of nationality. Hence, with her American passport she would receive a much higher wage than an Arab or Indian with the same experience and qualifications doing the same job. This lead, she felt, to hidden resentment.

However, she did feel that there was some sexism, although it was subtle rather than blatent - a woman, for example, was less likely to be promoted than a man.

Incidentally, as we outline on our page on woman workers in Qatar, the equality of woman when they are already working is protected by Qatar Labour Law i.e. women ought to have equal pay, training and promotion opportunities when doing the same job as a man.

Of course, to be allowed to work or even to drive, a woman needs the permission of her husband or, if still single, the male members of her family.

When at work, men and women are sometimes separated. For example, in clinics and hospitals there are separate sections for men and women. Nevertheless, Qatari men and women seem comfortable with dealing with people from the opposite sex - when they are foreigners. I have been in a meeting with Qatari women, however when a man has entered the atmosphere has suddenly changed, with both men and women appearing uncomfortable.

I've also heard from trainers that when classes of men and women have been merged, there has been considerable awkwardness.

"It's like teaching two classes," one trainer said, adding that the men, who were outnumbered by the women, appeared intimidated.

I actually asked some Qatari ladies whether they had experienced any difficult with men, but they said they didn't actually work face to face with men that much - it tended to be on the phone or through email. I mentioned that some Western friends had complained more of sexism from Western men, although I am not sure they completely understood.

"Maybe those men don't understand the culture here," one said. "You know, knocking on the door before entering and so on." (In Qatar it is normal for men to knock on the door of a woman's office and room and wait until it is open. This gives a chance for a women, should she wish, to cover her face.)

The final person I asked was a Japanese teacher. When I asked her if there was sexism in Qatar, she shook her head firmly.

"No," she said. "Quite the opposite. They [the men] treat you like royalty."

Read more: http://qatarvisitor.blogspot.com/2007/12/working-women-and-discrimination-in.html#ixzz1hdSvVFS7

More info:

“The Qatari woman exercises her full right to take her role in society and act as a vital element within the development process of the country. She has proven her ability to give and participate alongside her fellow men in all assignments and fields ....”

Law

Women head three sections in the Ministry of Justice: the Fatwah and Research, Legislation, Translation and Official Newsletter sections. There are also 5 female legal advisors in Fatwah and Legislation House and one in the State Cases Section.

Education

Statistics show that there are currently more female than male students at state-run schools; women represent 52% of the workforce at the Ministry of Education; women represent more than 50% of the administrative and staff members at Qatar University.

Politics/Suffrage

Male and female Qataris aged 18 and older are able to vote, and run as candidates for election. In April 2003, the first woman cabinet minister was elected in Qatar’s second municipal council elections. In 2006, women took two appointed positions – one, as the Minister for Education and Teaching and the other as a deputy chairperson in the National Human Rights Committee – and one elected position, in the 17-person Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

http://www.hziegler.com/locations/middle-east/qatar/articles/role-of-women-in-qatar.html

__________________________________

In regards to human rights there is already a human rights center established, Qatar National Human Rights Committee.

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Women athletes shine for hosts Qatar

Doha: Hosts Qatar who finished a memorable fourth at the 12th Arab Games Doha 2011 owe much of their success to women’s power.

The Qatari women won a record 32 medals at the two-week multi-sport event which ended here yesterday.

The fairer sex won ten gold and an equal number of silver medals, besides 12 bronze. The hosts won 32 gold, 38 silver and 40 bronze. At the last Arab Games in 2007, Qatar had won 14-13-13 medals.

The 2022 FIFA World Cup hosts, who are bidding for the 2020 Olympics, thus finished with a grand total of 110 medals overtaking their combined tally of 67-112-162 medals won over the last 11 editions of the Games, which were first held in Egypt in 1953.

The star women performers for the hosts were gymnast Shaden Wahdan and shooter Bahya Mansoor Al Hamad, both who finished with five medals each.

Sixteen-year-old Wahdan was the toast of Qatar as she became its most successful woman artistic gymnast at the Arab Games.

She won two gold medals, in beam and floor exercises, before clinching silver medals in individual all-around and vault, and bronze in uneven bars.

Al Bahya won three gold’s and two silver. The gold medals came in 50m Rifle 3 Positions, 50m Rifle 3 Position team event and 10m Air Rifle team event. She also won silver in women’s 10m Air Rifle and also teamed up her team-mates to win silver in 50m Rifle Prone team category.

Women were first allowed to compete at the Arab Games in the 1985 Rabat Games. It has been a long way since. The Doha edition of the Games saw the maximum number of women participation. 790 women took part here compared to the 600 that took part in the Games held in Egypt four years ago. The hosts were represented by a large contingent of 93 women athletes.

THE PENINSULA

:D

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Going back to the start of this thread, I'm sure how I missed this but:

If Doha wins the IAAF world championships bid, i think it will boost their SOG bid. What do you think?

.....in the meantime Doha doesn't win the bid....

Actually, I think not winning boosts their bid. A doha's win today will be the end of any 2020 dream. Cuz it will be another win on Qatar's strategy.

See that's what I was talking about... Doha's loose was better for their bid!

Why did you change your mind? :rolleyes:

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^^ Doha is bidding for the 2019 IAAF World championship :P , If they get it, it would be one year before the Olympics Doha is bidding for right now: (2019 IAAF - 2020 SOG - 2021 FIFA Confed-Cup - 2022 FIFA World Cup) :mellow: , Did I mention that Qatar is also bidding for the 2018 FIVB Volleyball Championships !?

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You can spin the issues any way you like for PR purposes. The fact remains that Qatar is an essentially non-sporting nation that is not a great proponent of Olympic ideals, does not have a good track record for gender equality and is therefore unworthy of hosting the Games. The only argument in their favor is that they are willing to pay any price for a status symbol. Everything else is smoke and mirrors. I wont be fooled and I doubt the IOC will be either.

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You can spin the issues any way you like for PR purposes. The fact remains that Qatar is an essentially non-sporting nation that is not a great proponent of Olympic ideals, does not have a good track record for gender equality and is therefore unworthy of hosting the Games. The only argument in their favor is that they are willing to pay any price for a status symbol. Everything else is smoke and mirrors. I wont be fooled and I doubt the IOC will be either.

Give it a rest, your argument is invalid. I posted more than enough substantial evidence or how gender equality has been achieved in Qatar and its continuing to be better and better. :rolleyes:

Calling Qatar a non-sporting nation is laughable :lol: :

2006 Asian Games

2010 IAAF Indoor's

2011 Asian Cup

2011 Arab Games

And in the future 2015 IHF Championships and 2022 FIFA World Cup.

Try to deny it as much as you want, a non-sporting nation wouldn't have organised such major events.

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Give it a rest, your argument is invalid. I posted more than enough substantial evidence or how gender equality has been achieved in Qatar and its continuing to be better and better. :rolleyes:

Calling Qatar a non-sporting nation is laughable :lol: :

2006 Asian Games

2010 IAAF Indoor's

2011 Asian Cup

2011 Arab Games

And in the future 2015 IHF Championships and 2022 FIFA World Cup.

Try to deny it as much as you want, a non-sporting nation wouldn't have organised such major events.

Except that it wasn't Qatar's sporting prowess or football pedigree that got them such events.

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Here's a link about the abuses to which I refer: http://www.amnesty.org/en/region/qatar/report-2011

Which part of my argument is invalid? Has Qatar won a third medal I don't know about? Are there Qatari female Olympians that somehow slipped out of the record books? Have Qataris suddenly started participating in the dozen plus Olympic events in which they've previously had no representation? Has there been a newsflash about summer temperatures dropping to a cool 80 degrees Fahrenheit? Perhaps the various IF's suddenly regard Qatar as their ideal partner and are willing to rework their entire schedule's around the Qatari appetite for prestige? Perhaps American football and baseball have decided to postpone their schedules for Doha? Perhaps European football is doing likewise because they are all so eager to come to Doha in October of 2020?

Doha offers money and the novelty of a Muslim Arab nation. Nothing else.

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Give it a rest, your argument is invalid. I posted more than enough substantial evidence or how gender equality has been achieved in Qatar and its continuing to be better and better. :rolleyes:

Calling Qatar a non-sporting nation is laughable :lol: :

2006 Asian Games

2010 IAAF Indoor's

2011 Asian Cup

2011 Arab Games

And in the future 2015 IHF Championships and 2022 FIFA World Cup.

Try to deny it as much as you want, a non-sporting nation wouldn't have organised such major events.

uff it turns into a rich mans story who never quits to spend his money to buy new items and redocrate it is...

mate... the point u dont get is clear...

spain 34 gold medals total 113

Turkey 37 gold medals total 83 medals

japan 123 gold medals total 361

italy 191 gold medals total 552

&

azerbaijan 4 gold medals total 16 (just at 4 games)

Qatar 2 medals which are bronze...

i understand u, u try to support your city as much as we do... but the fact Qatar and Doha is not ready for the games... yet....

capito?????

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