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if everyone in this thread just agrees to agree with you will you please stop? i'm not sure how many more pages of you posting the exact same post on the damn bus drivers getting lost we can take. i

Why do you like to repeat yourself multiple times? Its very annoying.

In sum....

Yeah, tall buildings, parks & rivers. No different than places like Toronto, Melbourne & Shanghai. But advocates of such places still drool over them when talking about the Olympics.

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That's a smattering of images from a quick Google search. They are only intended to provide a taste for those who have little sense of the city. How that warrants the verbal shredding that certain posters seem to perversely enjoy, I don't understand.

Much as I would love to take all of you to a play at Steppenwolf or the Goodman, the opera, the Art Institute, Shedd Aquarium, Navy Pier, countless fine restaurants, endless cultural festivals and outdoor events -- none of those things lends themselves terribly well to these boards. I wish I could find a decent picture of a Chicago sidewalk. Even little details like the urban plantings are stunning....

Pretty much all anyone can do to represent any bid city is post pictures of buildings (Chicago IS famous for its architecture), parks (which Chicago has in spades), lakefront (pretty spectacular) and river (I think its stunning).

If you all derive some pleasure out of spitting on Chicago -- I'm at a loss.

There's no personal bias coming into play for me here. I have no particular ties to Chicago -- I didn't grow up there and I have no family there. I did my undergrad there. That's it. I grew up in LA (and live here now), spent a while in NYC and lived Warwickshire in the UK while working on my Master's (consequently I spent a great deal of time in London). I know these cities well and in my opinion, Chicago is easily the US best bet for a Summer Olympic host.

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I've taken friends from London, New York and Paris to Chicago over the years and each one of them has loved it and compared it favorably to their hometowns. Perhaps it does lack a global profile (outside of the Anglosphere anyway), but once people get there and see that it truly is a beautiful, buzzing, global metropolis with insanely good public transportation and parks. It's cleaner than most cities of it's size and the city supports the arts to an unprecedented degree. Besides, there aren't many cities in the world (let alone the US) where you can walk from a giant skyscraper to a white sand beach in about 5 minutes.

Chicago is the ideal American Olympic city. New York doesn't need them (one could argue the likes of London, Paris and Rome don't, either, though) and LA really functions best as a back up plan. But Chicago could put on Olympics people would remember and it would benefit the city itself immensely. Only San Francisco would even be in it's league as a potential host city, though even then Chicago is streets ahead.

Like, who cares if the IOC representatives haven't visited Chicago as tourists? Their ignorance isn't a reflection of fact. After a Chicago Olympics, they absolutely WOULD want to go visit it. Besides, New York and LA are their own worlds... they really feel disconnected from the rest of the country, almost like Hong Kong. Chicago is really about as American as you can get.

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Chicago is unique. The Sears Tower (what is the name now) is the iconic landmark of the city and what identifies it. Just Like Shanghai with its skyline, Toronto and the CN Tower and Melbourne;s main train station.

But all of these cities suffer from a rapidly globalizing world, which means that many of these cities are starting to lose their distinctiveness. However, those unique landmarks do remain and do scream out the city's name.

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Chicago is unique. The Sears Tower (what is the name now) is the iconic landmark of the city and what identifies it. Just Like Shanghai with its skyline, Toronto and the CN Tower and Melbourne;s main train station.

But all of these cities suffer from a rapidly globalizing world, which means that many of these cities are starting to lose their distinctiveness. However, those unique landmarks do remain and do scream out the city's name.

It's Willis Tower now.

And I think Olympics always help to create a clearer, more characteristic image of a city or region.

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I do not think that word means what you think it means.

icon[ ahy-kon ]

noun

1. a picture, image, or other representation.

2. a representation of some sacred personage, as Christ or a saint or angel, painted usually on a wood surface and venerated itself as sacred.

3. a sign or representation that stands for its object by virtue of a resemblance or analogy to it.

I think of an icon as a potent, "signature image" that functions as a highly concentrated representation or embodiment of a given object (in this case a city).

Examples of icons in other cities: the Golden Gate Bridge, the Statue of Liberty, the Hollywood sign.

A non-descript city (such as Tulsa) would be the antithesis of an iconic one (such as Chicago) which boasts icons such as the Willis (formerly Sears) Tower, Grant Park, the Bean, Lakeshore Drive, Water Tower, the Chicago River.... And the list goes on.

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Yeah, tall buildings, parks & rivers. No different than places like Toronto, Melbourne & Shanghai. But advocates of such places still drool over them when talking about the Olympics.

Something tells me the residents of Chicago, Toronto, Melbourne and Shanghai would have a bone to pick with you when you say their cities are "no different."

As I said-- only so much can be conveyed in pictures from a google search. My goal was solely to give people a taste of Chicago.

One of the things I find unusual about Chicago is that it actually IS as beautiful as it looks in pictures. Many cities are disappointing on closer inspection, but in my experience, Chicago does a great job of living up to even the most idealized photographs. Of course, like any city, it has it's rough spots, but for the most part it's clean, bright, beautifully designed and landscaped and very visitor-friendly.

It's too bad the Evaluation Committee visits will always be in the dead of winter. Chicago's brutally cold in February and March -- and usually blanketed with snow......

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Oh, come on. It was the Sears Tower forever. We all know what we're talking about. Somebody else just paid to have their name on it. Same icon.

Exactly! I put (what is it called now) cuz I didn't know the name but I knew the tower existed.

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Something tells me the residents of Chicago, Toronto, Melbourne and Shanghai would have a bone to pick with you when you say their cities are "no different."

I was being facetious, over the poster that made the reference in jest over the pictures that you posted. That "Chicago has a bunch of tall buildings, a river, a park, etc.. just like 'every other' big city in the world".

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I've been to Chicago only once. I got the impression that it's essentially a very, very big small town. The big city interpretation of small town America, if you will. In that regard, I can see how a Chicago Games would really give the world a much more "American" Games than LA or New York.

New York is where I've always lived and would prefer to see a Games here, but I wouldn't be upset to see Chicago host. It's a stunning city that would really be considered world-class globally if it was simply located outside the US. Though I'm not sure if a future Chicago bid's "story" should be, "Come and discover Chicago!" over "Come to Chicago because it's in the US and you'll make lots of money here." I get the feeling that when the IOC decides to land the Games in the US again, the deciding impetus wouldn't be the chance to discover a city but more to do with their pockets.

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I was being facetious, over the poster that made the reference in jest over the pictures that you posted. That "Chicago has a bunch of tall buildings, a river, a park, etc.. just like 'every other' big city in the world".

Got it. I'm sorry.

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Chicago is still an enormous city by any measure - third largest city of the United States is nothing to look down upon. Any city compared to NYC is bound to look half hearted to some degree, but I think Chicago is in a position to be a city to host on behalf of an entire nation - an idea, I feel, Atlanta failed to convey.

I'm split, if the Olympics goes back to the US I think I could not choose between Chicago or NYC. Chicago is technically superior. NYC is... NYC. King-pin. Close second to these two, for me are Philadelphia, San Francisco and Washington DC.

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The biggest challenge facing any American bid is the story. The financial incentive is there -- it's the elephant in the room that everyone is aware of, but no one is willing to openly acknowledge. Thats why there must be a compelling story. What is it? Urban regeneration? Environmental consciousness?

No matter what, I think the next Anerican Olympics must be "other-focused." aggressive flag-waving and chest-thumping isn't going to help the US. We have to emphasize how Olympuc ideals are woven into the DNA of our country (which is actually completely true). We need to focus on welcoming the world and celebrating diversity -- not tooting our own horn.

Perhaps the next American bid will tell a bigger American story rather than just a city-specific story....

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No matter what, I think the next Anerican Olympics must be "other-focused." aggressive flag-waving and chest-thumping isn't going to help the US. We have to emphasize how Olympuc ideals are woven into the DNA of our country (which is actually completely true). We need to focus on welcoming the world and celebrating diversity -- not tooting our own horn.

How exactly was Chicago 2016 "aggressive flag-waving and chest-thumping", or "tooting our own horn"?

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The biggest challenge facing any American bid is the story. The financial incentive is there -- it's the elephant in the room that everyone is aware of, but no one is willing to openly acknowledge. Thats why there must be a compelling story. What is it? Urban regeneration? Environmental consciousness?

No matter what, I think the next Anerican Olympics must be "other-focused." aggressive flag-waving and chest-thumping isn't going to help the US. We have to emphasize how Olympuc ideals are woven into the DNA of our country (which is actually completely true). We need to focus on welcoming the world and celebrating diversity -- not tooting our own horn.

Perhaps the next American bid will tell a bigger American story rather than just a city-specific story....

This is where Philadelphia rises to mind. It's struggling with quite a lot of urban planning social issues, and I think if there was anywhere in the US that could pull that "East London revitalisation" card, its Philadelphia (you could also say Detroit, but thats the only card they'd have to play). To go with this "revitalisation"- it has that amazing waterfront just crying out to be redeveloped. It ticks the East Coast card, its halfway been NYC and DC (the compromise? this could also allow all Football venues to be in the DC/Balt/Philly/NJ/NY region), and in its own right is an historically important US city. It's also beautiful and quite photogenic, and has quite a distinct, cultivated culture.

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How exactly was Chicago 2016 "aggressive flag-waving and chest-thumping", or "tooting our own horn"?

It wasn't. I didn't say it was. I still think the US can improve by honing a more global, inclusive tenor for their bids.

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This is where Philadelphia rises to mind. It's struggling with quite a lot of urban planning social issues, and I think if there was anywhere in the US that could pull that "East London revitalisation" card, its Philadelphia (you could also say Detroit, but thats the only card they'd have to play). To go with this "revitalisation"- it has that amazing waterfront just crying out to be redeveloped. It ticks the East Coast card, its halfway been NYC and DC (the compromise? this could also allow all Football venues to be in the DC/Balt/Philly/NJ/NY region), and in its own right is an historically important US city. It's also beautiful and quite photogenic, and has quite a distinct, cultivated culture.

Well, I haven't been to Philly, so my impressions may be flawed.

My sense is that it lags far behind LA, NYC, SF and Chicago in terms of international recognition. I'm not sure there's an x-factor there. I worry Philly could seem like a second-string bid to the IOC.

By contrast, I doubt Chicago would. Among other things, the stats are certainly in their favor. 2016 will help buy them credibility and sympathy. I think voters would look at Chicago completely differently (and far more positively) a second time around.

Of course, none of this matters if Chicago isn't ready to pick themselves up and try again...

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By contrast, I doubt Chicago would. Among other things, the stats are certainly in their favor. 2016 will help buy them credibility and sympathy. I think voters would look at Chicago completely differently (and far more positively) a second time around

That hasn't helped Istanbul or Madrid. Why Chicago?

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