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USA 2024


Athensfan
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I went to New York last year for the World Police and Fire Games, whilst there were elements of the city I loved, the way the games went largely ignored, especially by the Mayor's office was quite upsetting, especially coinciding as it did with the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

I spoke to locals and local firecrews who weren't surprised by the lack of interest, they considered the city too large for the games and the locals to interested in their day to day lives. Of course the Olympics is another matter but after the criticism of past New York bids being based on a sense of entitlement, you might have thought this was a way to prove that New York would work for it

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I went to New York last year for the World Police and Fire Games, whilst there were elements of the city I loved, the way the games went largely ignored, especially by the Mayor's office was quite upsetting, especially coinciding as it did with the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

I spoke to locals and local firecrews who weren't surprised by the lack of interest, they considered the city too large for the games and the locals to interested in their day to day lives. Of course the Olympics is another matter but after the criticism of past New York bids being based on a sense of entitlement, you might have thought this was a way to prove that New York would work for it

I say this respectfully as a life-long New Yorker, but I've never even heard of the World Police and Fire Games, let alone that they were held here last year. And I know I was here on the boards plenty around that time since it was the lead-up into the deadline for 2020 candidates. I can't exactly fault the mayor's office for largely ignoring it (which sounds pretty accurate), especially since the event started during the last week of August. Pretty sure the mayor's office had bigger things to deal with then, you know with our new friend Irene bearing down on the city, although it seemed that the impact of the storm was less than advertised, despite the city's over-prepared response which I can't find too much fault with.

That all said, if you're trying to put the WPFG in its place in terms of size and scale when compared to the Olympics, the 2 are worlds apart. NYC hosted the Goodwill Games in 1998, an event with competitions held in large stadiums with some of the best athletes in the world and television coverage on a national network. That's the type of large-scale event that could prepare a city for the Olympics. You can't honestly, with a straight face, sell me on the idea that the World Police and Fire Games are the type of event that means anything towards New York's Olympic aspirations. I would hardly consider it a large-scale event on the level of a Pan Am Games or the like. Again, the fact that nearly 1 year later is the first time I'm acknowledging the event probably should say something about its profile.

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as we wait for the USOC to tip its hat regarding 2022/4, we will have to content ourselves with more some of the organization's more pressing priorities.

Knitters Outraged After U.S. Olympic Committee Squashes Knitting ‘Olympics’

If you mess with the Olympics trademark, a cloud of legal hurt will descend on you faster than Tyson Gay in the Men's 100 meters. Case in point: The U.S. Olympic Committee has sent a cease and desist letter to a knitting-based social network for hosting a knitting "olympics." Now, knitters are in revolt.

2012 was to be the third year that the knitting social network Ravelry—yes, this exists and is surprisingly popular—hosted a "Ravelympics," a knitting competition for users that includes events like an "afghan marathon," and "scarf hockey." Knitters were supposed to compete in their events while watching the actual Games on TV.

http://gawker.com/59...g-real-athletes

Edited by krow
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as we wait for the USOC to tip its hat regarding 2022/4, we will have to content ourselves with more some of the organization's more pressing priorities.

http://gawker.com/59...g-real-athletes[/b]

That is absolutely digsusting, the Olympic's have lost any credibility they ever had, do you think Pierre de Coubertin, was rubbing his hands together thinking about how much money he'd be able to rake in by re-establishing Olympic Games, I have nothing but contempt for IOC, and the USOC. You konw you'd expect something like that from the NFL they are a business but from an organization that is supposed to transcend all the pettiness, I find the more I read about any Olympic Committee national or International, the more I dislike them. I don't expect that any of you all share my feelings you're all shills for anything Olympic, I just find it disgusting and over commercialized to the extreme.

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That is absolutely digsusting, the Olympic's have lost any credibility they ever had

At the end of the day to maintain ownership of a trademark in the US, you have to show that you take reasonable steps to enforce your ownership. I know, sounds ridiculous, but if the USOC stops trying to enforce trademarks, then the registrations can be challenged.

Do you really want that to happen? Then we'll have

- The Baseball Olympics

- The Gay Pride Olympics

- The Most-people-that-can-fit-in-a-phonebox Olympics....

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I actually don't have a problem with the USOC asserting their legal rights. It's unfortunate that the knitters turned out to be a casualty, but Canis has a point. Rights to the Olympic brand are a vital way for the USOC to raise revenue in the absence of government funding. I agree that the Olympics can be disgustingly commercial, but at the same time it takes money to do just about anything. I don't fault the USOC here.

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The problems wasn't just the IOC keeping their brand. They were jerks about it. They went out of their way to insult knitters. When the knitters pushed back, they issues an incredibly lame "we didn't do anything wrong but here's the appology our mom lawyers made us write" statement that only made the situation worse.

<sarcasm> Yeah, these guys are going to be able to drum up public support for the Olympics in the US.

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I'm surprised you are OK with the USOC needlessly insulting people, then making the situation worse with a horrible non-apology. But to each their own I guess.

My point isn't that the knitting incident is going to hurt the USOC. Just that iit demonstrates the USOC seems to be lacking some of the skills that are going to be needed to get a bid supported.

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I'm surprised you are OK with the USOC needlessly insulting people, then making the situation worse with a horrible non-apology. But to each their own I guess.

My point isn't that the knitting incident is going to hurt the USOC. Just that iit demonstrates the USOC seems to be lacking some of the skills that are going to be needed to get a bid supported.

Agreed. They have a legal right to protect their brand, even if it comes off to us as petty. But do it with some dignity. These knitting folks aren't upset so much that they lost their ability to use a particular name, they're angry because the USOC basically said "who the hell are you to compare yourselves to our proud Olympians." Assert your legal standing which you have every right to do, but don't try and play the pity card as if any Olympic athlete actually gives a crap about the Ravelympics or whatever they called it.

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I'm surprised you are OK with the USOC needlessly insulting people, then making the situation worse with a horrible non-apology. But to each their own I guess.

My point isn't that the knitting incident is going to hurt the USOC. Just that iit demonstrates the USOC seems to be lacking some of the skills that are going to be needed to get a bid supported.

I'm not ok with anyone needlessly insulting people. Maybe I'm unaware of some important quote here, but from where I sit the USOC simply called a spade a spade. Knitters aren't Olympians. The rights to the Olympic brand are an important part of funding those endeavors and they should be protected.

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"We believe using the name 'Ravelympics' for a competition that involves an afghan marathon, scarf hockey and sweater triathlon, among others, tends to denigrate the true nature of the Olympic Games. In a sense, it is disrespectful to our country's finest athletes and fails to recognize or appreciate their hard work"

That's not protecting your trademark. That's going out of your way - needlessly - to insult people. So far, you are the only person I've seen that has no problem with it. Even the USOC felt there was somthing wrong with their first letter as they tried to issue an appology. Unfortunately, that non-appology showed the same tin-ear the cease and disist letter did.

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"We believe using the name 'Ravelympics' for a competition that involves an afghan marathon, scarf hockey and sweater triathlon, among others, tends to denigrate the true nature of the Olympic Games. In a sense, it is disrespectful to our country's finest athletes and fails to recognize or appreciate their hard work"

That's not protecting your trademark. That's going out of your way - needlessly - to insult people. So far, you are the only person I've seen that has no problem with it. Even the USOC felt there was somthing wrong with their first letter as they tried to issue an appology. Unfortunately, that non-appology showed the same tin-ear the cease and disist letter did.

I haven't read that quote before. It is clumsy and too strongly worded, but it's still not a major issue. Cease and desist letters are often too strong. Those kinds of letters go out all over the country to various unsuspecting individuals and organizations (I've gotten one before). Lawyers overstate their position to scare people into action so that the expense of a suit can be avoided. That certainly does not make it right or good, but it's not uncommon or abnormal either.

Because the USOC is so publicly visible, because the Olympics are right around the corner and because knitters (of all groups!) seem like such an innocent target, this story got some attention. However, especially after reading that quote, I still think this whole thing is overblown and undeserving of so many posts -- particularly in a thread about 2024 American bids. I am convinced that this will have zero impact on such a bid.

I remain supportive of the USOC's decision. While their word choice was not optimal, their actions were still appropriate.

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Because the USOC is so publicly visible, because the Olympics are right around the corner and because knitters (of all groups!) seem like such an innocent target, this story got some attention. However, especially after reading that quote, I still think this whole thing is overblown and undeserving of so many posts -- particularly in a thread about 2024 American bids. I am convinced that this will have zero impact on such a bid.

I think the original post from krow was mostly a tongue-in-cheek reaction to the story and its affect on USA 2024, which is course is zero. I don't think anyone here thinks this is even remotely an issue for anything or that it won't blow over in a week.

That all said, obviously the USOC thinks they did something wrong here (again, not that anyone expects for there to be reprecussions) or else they wouldn't have gone through the steps of making a public apology.. and then issuing another apology to the first apology because it was so half-assed. Yes, this is getting our attention because it's playing out somewhat publicly (as many things to in the age of instant news and status updates) and it'll be forgotten soon enough, but for folks like us who follow the actions of the USOC on a regular basis, this does make their organization look a little petty. They have a right to protect their trademark from a legal standpoint and it's totally understandable they'd send a cease and desist letter. But they didn't have to be so douchey about it as if Olympic athletes are somehow denigrated by a knitting Olympics.

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So is Denver a legit possibility for 2024?

I love the town, but it seems unlikely. My first thought is "sailing?" I don't think the altitude is a problem. It worked in Mexico City. It's kind of a cool extra challenge. Not at all convinced the city is big enough, has the infrastructure or the international reputation though. That said, Colorado's natural beauty is spectacular. That alone could make it a wonderfully unique change of pace from recent metropolitan hosts.

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Like I said in the Denver thread in the GB newswire section;

The Denver metro area is on the smallish side for a Summer Games to accommodate all the necessary requirements. Smaller than Minneapolis & smaller than Atlanta was back in the 90's.

Also Denver is still not a premier American city to boast for a Summer Games. Perfect Winter nomination but no further. Denver & Colorado R more well known for their winter recreations than summer sports.

Not to mention the 1976 Achilles heel that would stick out more in a summer showdown competition. I'm sure the USOC would be quick to put things into perspective for them between the two seasonal Olympic events.

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So is Denver a legit possibility for 2024?

I love the town, but it seems unlikely. My first thought is "sailing?" I don't think the altitude is a problem. It worked in Mexico City. It's kind of a cool extra challenge. Not at all convinced the city is big enough, has the infrastructure or the international reputation though. That said, Colorado's natural beauty is spectacular. That alone could make it a wonderfully unique change of pace from recent metropolitan hosts.

I don't think Denver could be an option because of the altitude.

When you look at South Africa, the main reason why Johannesburg is not considered, is because of the altitude. They have a 38,000 seat athletics stadium which was used for the All Africa games, but altitude is a distorting factor.

Mexico City is at about 2,200 metres, Johannesburg at 1750 metres so Denver is slightly lower at about 1600 metres.

Sailing is not so much of an issue. Prague proposed a reservoir in their 2016 bid, and I don't believe that was an issue.

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2 rather LARGE factors work against a Denver summer bid:

1. Altitude. No one wants a repeat of a Mexico City altitude if possible.

2. the 1972-76 chapter.

Size might not be a problem since its metro area does go above the magic "2.5 million mark." Sailing could take place in Lake Las Vegas, Havasu or San Francisco (using the Amerca's Cup 2013 piers). But Factors 1 and 2 will make it very difficult.

I don't know that the USOC complex in Colorado Springs will be of any help, other than being a training center.

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Altitude is the least of Denver's issues when compiled against everything else for a Summer bid. There are other critical areas where they lack for a Summer bid TBW & those R their main hurdles. Really, the only main piece that they have for a summer bid is the stadium, but other than that, not much.

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Size might not be a problem since its metro area does go above the magic "2.5 million mark." .

But that's the bare MINIMUM number that Rogge talks about, which Denver just barely makes. So why settle for just the bare minimum when you could have much bigger choices.

If Minneapolis, a metro business area of almost 3.5 million, still lacks in accommodations & transportation, what does an even smaller have to boast. N that's before we even take into consideration the lack of international appeal that these cities have for a summer bid.

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