Jump to content

USA 2024


Athensfan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Last thing I heard about is that DOSB asks for any bids at any date (also Munich 2022 seems possible again: "Wir begrüßen alle Initiativen für olympische Bewerbungen, auch diese, unabhängig von der genauen Jahreszahl" - We welcome here any initiatives for Olympic bids, also this [Munich] one, irrespective of the exact date).

But this is a thread for a US bid in 2024. I think Philadelphia is a pretty good idea, but I have my doubts with Franklin Field as an Athletics venue. Where should they build those almost 30,000 temporary seats?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But this is a thread for a US bid in 2024. I think Philadelphia is a pretty good idea, but I have my doubts with Franklin Field as an Athletics venue. Where should they build those almost 30,000 temporary seats?

Having spent more time at Franklin Field here than anyone, here's the story with them..

penn-relays-franklin-field.jpg

Forgot adding 30,000 seats, it's the track you have to worry about. Remember what they have there is not a regulation 9-lane 400 meter track. I believe it's the inside of lane 4 that represents the 400 meter mark and there's a brick wall going most of the way around the stadium just outside the last lane (see above image). So the venue as it exists now is not an option to be an athletics venue. The only way to make it work would be to completely demolish the current stadium and rebuild it. Knowing Penn as well as I do, I don't know that's going to be an option for them. And over the last decade or so, they've put a lot of money into sprucing up that part of campus, so I don't know if they would be too big on a major project taking over that area at this point. There was a consideration that the Phillies might look at that area for their new stadium, so it's not lacking for space, but again, will they want to build a brand new stadium there? Probably not. As much as I've championed the idea of having the main stadium there (Penn's campus could potentially be your village and you have public transportation right nearby with 30th Street Station), I don't know how feasible it's going to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frankly it seems a very uncomfortable time to put Penn -- especially their stadium (!) in the spotlight. The scandal will not be forgotten in 12 years.

The stadium is a far cry from Okympic caliber anyway.

It's absolutely not Olympic caliber. It's perfect for hosting the Penn Relays every year, but there's nothing that can be done to take that stadium and make it suitable to host an Olympics.

And if every student there had a nickel for each time we had to explain this... Penn = University of Pennsylvania. No affiliation whatsoever with Pennsylvania State University in State College. There was no scandal at Penn (I actually had to think about that one for a second before I realized what you were referring to)... NOT%2BPENN%2BSTATE%2BLOGO.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am so sorry. I'm an idiot. I do know the difference and I got them garbled. Please forgive me.

Don't sweat it. Like I said, it's been a running joke that people don't know the difference and that there they sell t-shirts that say "NOT PENN STATE" (I think I still own 1, actually).

But yea, getting back to Penn.. they have fields and venues that could be made useful, but I'm not sure how willing they would be to make them available for the Olympics. For example, the Palestra (Penn's basketball arena) holds 8700 people, but the inside has barely been touched (that's largely by design in order to keep the history intact). So what happens when the IOC or whatever sport federation wants to take over the place to do their own thing there. So again, it's where I'd love to push Philadelphia because I think those could host a wonderful Olympics, but insomuch as they have a lot in place, I'm not sure just how usable it all is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes I have. Obviously, u were sleeping and u missed it.

Yes. That must be it.

I have to wonder of there's enough money in Philly to pull off the Games. There is in NYC, LA, Chicago, probably Texas. Are there enough corporate headquarters in Philly to make it work?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. That must be it.

I have to wonder of there's enough money in Philly to pull off the Games. There is in NYC, LA, Chicago, probably Texas. Are there enough corporate headquarters in Philly to make it work?

Well in terms of money you begin with

COMCAST - owners of the NBC/Universal group - it is the 7th largest metropolitan economy in the USA with a total GDP of $347billion in 2010

Other huge companies on the Fortune 500 include Colonial Penn, Lincoln Financial, CIGNA, Sunoco, Boeing Rotocraft, GlaxoSmithKline (USA) etc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well in terms of money you begin with

COMCAST - owners of the NBC/Universal group - it is the 7th largest metropolitan economy in the USA with a total GDP of $347billion in 2010

Other huge companies on the Fortune 500 include Colonial Penn, Lincoln Financial, CIGNA, Sunoco, Boeing Rotocraft, GlaxoSmithKline (USA) etc

Are we confident that they'll all chip in though? Comcast -- obviously. And it would be a nice way for the IOC to reward them for their exorbitant tv rights. I'm not saying they can't do it. I just wonder if money is more of a question in Philly than it is with the other big three. That's probably a question they're quietly exploring right now.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are we confident that they'll all chip in though? Comcast -- obviously. And it would be a nice way for the IOC to reward them for their exorbitant tv rights. I'm not saying they can't do it. I just wonder if money is more of a question in Philly than it is with the other big three. That's probably a question they're quietly exploring right now.

Well they've indicated that they want to bid - Philadelphia public officials that is.

As for the main stadium, I hear what they say about the Franklin. However the Temple Owls used the Linc at the moment and might fancy getting their own stadium (they left Temple Stadium in 1977) and Villanova Wildcats who are currently looking at playing some games at the PPL because their own stadium is too small.

An 80,000 (4 deck) stadium, with the top 2 decks removed post games could easily suit eithers needs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Funny these sorts of stories. I hadn't seen any mention of Dallas being interested in any bids. But now I guess they'll get factored in to discussions, now that the USOC have denied they're planning a Dallas bid.

Dallas bid for Olympics and Paralympics is not on our agenda right now say USOC

May 16 - The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) have said that they are not considering putting forward a Dallas bid for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games at this stage after amid reports that the city in Texas is looking to be a future American Candidate City.

Dallas is one of the major sporting cities in America and illustrated its capability to host a major sporting competition last year when it hosted the Super Bowl for the first time ever at the 80,000 capacity Cowboys Stadium in the Dallas–Fort Worth metropolitan area.

Dallas also hosted the prestigious 2012 Team USA Media Summit here where speakers have included First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama (pictured) and swimming star Michael Phelps, the most successful Olympian in history with 14 gold medals.

But USOC chief communications and public affairs officer Patrick Sandusky said that the Summit is in no way designed as a prelude to an Olympic and Paralympic bid.

"Eventually a Dallas bid may be on our agenda but not at this point," Sandusky told insidethegames.

"That didn't factor into why we came here for the Team USA Media Summit.

"They have got a very good Sports Commission here and they have been very helpful with us in terms of volunteers and getting behind this but that is not because they are interested in bidding at this point.

"It is because they are a real sporting city and one of America's main sporting hubs.

"They have just had the Super Bowl in 2011 and they have National Football League (NFL) and Major League Baseball (MBL) annual meetings at this venue [the Hilton Anatole] so it was an opportunity for us to tap into that expertise."

Sandusky's comments are no major surprise due to the fact that negotiations between the USOC and International Olympic Committee (IOC) over their revenue-sharing agreement are still on-going.

The USOC currently receives a 20 per cent share of global sponsorship revenue and a 12.75 per cent share of US broadcast rights deals but many international officials, including the IOC, think it is too big a portion.

The issue has caused huge tension between the IOC and USOC in the past with America still recovering from the humiliation three years ago of seeing Chicago eliminated in the first round of voting for the 2016 Olympics and Paralympics, which was awarded to Rio de Janeiro.

It came after New York's bid for 2012 also faltered, with London eventually awarded the Games, and America sat out the bid campaign for the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, declaring that they will not bid for the Games again until they have reached an agreement over revenue sharing.

"We are not looking at any cities right now," continued Sandusky, who served as spokesperson and vice-president of communications for the Chicago 2016 Olympic and Paralympic bid.

"We certainly know that Dallas, among many other US cities, would be interested in bidding but that is not our focal point right now.

...

More: Insidethegames

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The child molestation allegations against Jerry Sandusky

You have the wrong university in mind. Jerry Sandusky is at Penn State. Franklin Field, which is the discussion you commented on, is part of University of Pennsylvania. In fact, Penn State is not even in Philadelphia, so this is completely irrelevant for a Philly Olympic bid

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have the wrong university in mind. Jerry Sandusky is at Penn State. Franklin Field, which is the discussion you commented on, is part of University of Pennsylvania. In fact, Penn State is not even in Philadelphia, so this is completely irrelevant for a Philly Olympic bid

I guess you missed the next post after Athens' where I corrected him that Penn is not Penn State. That's long been a running joke for Penn students

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have the wrong university in mind. Jerry Sandusky is at Penn State. Franklin Field, which is the discussion you commented on, is part of University of Pennsylvania. In fact, Penn State is not even in Philadelphia, so this is completely irrelevant for a Philly Olympic bid

If you had read the rest of thread you would see that I made a mistake, which I thoroughly apologized for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How New York City Won the Olympics

Didn't know where else to put this, but this thread seems like a good spot and if you're confused about the title, here's an except from the end..

This report demonstrates that New York City, though not winning the competition to be the Host City for the 2012 Olympic Games, has achieved virtually all of the key elements of the NYC2012 Plan without having to hold the Games. The bold and visionary NYC2012 Plan has strengthened neighborhoods across the City and fostered new public and private investment in long-neglected, underused, industrial corridors. The legacy of the NYC2012 Plan is not confined to one project, borough, or community.

Essentially, this goes along with what I've said about NYC2012. That it was largely a 1-shot deal and after the loss to London, the city essentially said "screw it, we don't need the Olympics, let's do these things anyway." I know it's the antithesis of what the USOC should be looking for in a potential host city (i.e. the type of city that will keep at it until they win), but when an Olympics is tied to infrastructure improvements, that's the problem with the potential of not winning. New York is a world class city in every sense (not that I'm biased or anything) and we don't need the Olympics to justify that. So unlike Los Angeles of the 1960s and 1970s, we're not going to wait around for it to come to us when there's othe projects/infrastructure improvements to worry about in the meantime.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

we're not going to wait around for it to come to us when there's othe projects/infrastructure improvements to worry about in the meantime.

Interesting article, and a lot of what has been said here. The alpha cities in the US are development minded. As such, the time for a bid is generally unique, and what is a great plan for a certain bid year, won't be workable in future years as the space will have been developed regardless. The same is the case for Chicago. Development will proceed, and given the result of the 2016 vote, there was really no reason for Chicago to consider hanging around and bidding again.

European cities have a major NIMBY problem. As such, in some of them, nothing really happens without an external shove. London's east side regeneration would have gone nowhere without an Olympic Commitment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...