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USA 2024


Athensfan
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Phoenix is too hot in the Summer. End of story. Plus there aren't enough other things for International tourists to do there.

Ehh... well I found this online a while back and though I would share a few of my favorites (off of a much longer list) I added some personal notes in italics

You Know You’re From Arizona When…

You no longer associate bridges or rivers with water. So true...

You know a swamp cooler is not a happy hour drink. Only in Phoenix would a swamp cooler ever work..

You can hear the weather forecast of 115 degrees without flinching. on a cold day like today I would be excited...

You can be in the snow, then drive for an hour…and it will be over 90 degrees. I have actually done this before... a very surreal experience

You discover, in July it only takes two fingers to drive your car, because your steering wheel is so hot. I can drive with just one fingertip

You can make sun tea instantly. just put a jar of plain water on the front porch and it will magically turn to tea in seconds before evaporating

You run your a/c in the middle of winter so you can use your fireplace. I don't have a fireplace but people really do this here... its not a joke

The best parking is determined by shade…..not distance. at walmart you will see tons of cars out in the back of the parking lot and the first 4 rows without any trees are all empty

You realize that “Valley Fever” isn’t a disco dance. A colleague of mine got this and was hospitalized last month

Hotter water comes from the cold water tap than the hot one. 100% true, in the summer I turn my shower handle to 'cold' and get hot water, save a fortune on my water heater in the summer

It’s noon in July, kids are on summer vacation and yet all the streets are totally empty of both cars and people. In mid-July someone driving through town would think the rapture happened and they got left behind

You actually burn your hand opening the car door. many times... <_<

Sunscreen is sold year round, kept right at the checkout counter. 100% true

Some fools will market mini-misters for joggers and some other fools will actually buy them. Worse…..some fools actually try to jog. sadly true...

You see two trees fighting over a dog. it is exciting to watch, from the comfort of indoor refrigeration of course

You see more irrigation water on the street than there is in the Salt River I have seriously gone off on my HOA several times about this one...

You can pronounce”Saguaro”, “Tempe”, “San Xavier”, “Canyon de Chelly”, “Mogollon Rim”, and “Cholla” none of these are pronounced the way you would think... not even remotely close

You can fry an egg on the hood of a car IN THE MORNING! my 5th graders did this for science one day

You hear people say “but it’s a DRY heat!” it really does make a HUGE difference

You buy salsa by the gallon. I have a half-gallon in my fridge and another half-gallon in the pantry right now, does that count?

Your Christmas decorations include sand and paper bags. the seriously did, and so did my neighbors...

You think a red light is merely a suggestion. aren't they? I had to learn a whole new way of driving when I moved here from Ohio in 2008...

You think someone driving wearing oven mitts is clever. It is and I keep a pair in my glove box, learned that lesson within 2 days of moving here

Most of the restaurants in town have the first name “El” or “Los.” they really do

You think 60 tons of crushed red rock makes a beautiful yard. my front yard gravel is beautiful! (see below)

Your house is made of stucco and has a red clay tile roof. it is! (see below)

Vehicles with open windows have the right-of-way in the summer. state law I think...

Kids will ask, “What’s a mosquito?” I grew up in the middle of the "Great Black Swamp" in NW Ohio where the mosquitoes can consume an entire human in 30 seconds... and have never seen one here in 3 years The kids who have lived here their whole lives think the rest of america is like Phoenix... they have no clue..

People who have black cars or black upholstery in their car are automatically assumed to be from out of-state or nuts. I worked for Kia selling cars this summer... no one ever asked for it, not once...

You know better than to get into a car with leather seats if you’re wearing shorts. Oh yeah...

You can finish a Big Gulp in 10 minutes and go back for seconds. One day this summer I drank four 44 ounce drinks in one day and never had to use the restroom

You actually get these jokes and pass them on to other friends from Arizona. ...And I just did :D

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No... the Olympic Marathon for the Phoenix 2160 games shall be held at high Noon in the 118 degree heat... it will build character... wat does not kill you makes you stronger... and any atletes that somehow don't die in the marathon must already be strong.... :rolleyes:

Edit: god this forum needs a spellchecker... I can't type worth a darn apparently...

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The issue remains the same as it has been in the past. I'm pretty confident the USOC would like to put forth a bid for 2024. But unless they want to go to the prom alone, they need a prom date. And it doesn't seem like any of the hot girls are interested right now. So the question becomes do you take a less attractive date or do you just not go at all.

As much as the USOC would probably like to bid, they (and prospective host cities) have to weigh the risks/costs. It's not like with other countries where the NOC is in control of the bid process. I know some here have said that needs to change in the United States, but we know that's not going to happen (nor should it). And that's going to scare off a lot of cities from a more serious pursuit, even for a Winter Olympics, yes even for Reno. Interest is 1 thing, serious financial backing is another. It's not cheap to bid for an Olympics.

So then what of Los Angeles. If the alpha cities aren't there and none of the beta cities look that appealing, does the USOC push for LA and hope an Atlanta-like set of circumstances propels them to a win? Comparisons to London and Paris are not applicable here.. London had 64 years between 1948 and 2012, Paris would be no less than a century. LA's Olympics would be 2 in 40 years and 3 in less than a century. Don't like those odds. Aside from that, as we've been discussing, what does LA 2024 do for the Olympic movement? Equally important, what does the Olympic movement do for LA? If they can't put together something that's going to impress the IOC, is it even worth the effort?

Ideally, the USOC would find a city that wants to commit to bidding through multiple cycles rather than being one and done. Of course at this point, even the latter is tough to come by. As much as the USOC (not to mention certain posters here) would love to see a Summer Olympics in the United States sooner rather than later, a lot of things have to come together for that to happen, the least of which being the revenue deal, continental rotation, or any perception out there that the IOC is going to continue to bypass and ignore North America for the foreseeable future.

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The issue remains the same as it has been in the past. I'm pretty confident the USOC would like to put forth a bid for 2024. But unless they want to go to the prom alone, they need a prom date. And it doesn't seem like any of the hot girls are interested right now. So the question becomes do you take a less attractive date or do you just not go at all.

Brilliant analogy...

I know a girl who loves to party... she likes to drink and smoke, lives in a trailer, has 4 kids from 4 different baby-daddies (and Maury has helped her identify one so far...)... She also has a bit of a gambling problem... But she really wants to go to prom soon... her name is Reno.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Seriously though... I agree that a winter bid is a stretch... summer would be a miracle... I think only LA could bid but their odds of success are very, very low, but the plus side is that LA has consistently demonstrated a willingness to keep trying over and over again... I think they are the only credible US city that is not going to be a 'one-off' bid city... As other have said... what can LA do for the Olympics? What will the legacy be? What can the Olympics do for LA? If they can provide realy good answers to those questions, then good luck to LA! ;)

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I think that all of us in this thread can agree that in order for LA to have a shot at this, that they would need to make a strong case. Otherrwise, they, along with the USOC, should just forget about it. But like I said earlier, the USOC was very largely prepared to have made LA the 2016 candidate instead of Chicago. I think that Chicago got lucky (well, in hindsight now, unlucky) to have been picked, since Ueberoth was bias in wanting a west coast candidate.

That said, I don't think that totally dismissing LA because 40 years is still not long enough for some, should just be tossed to the wayside that easily. Yeah, London waited 64 years, but if these things are suppose to be in some kind of ''chronological Olympic order'', then Paris should've been the one to have gotten 2012 N not London. So it's obvious that the IOC doesn't use that as a prime criteria rather than just a timetable. As long as a reasonable amount of time has passed, N 40 years is reasonable, then its worth looking into. But again, only if LA can come up with a compelling enough case. N we all seem to agree on that aspect.

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I think that all of us in this thread can agree that in order for LA to have a shot at this, that they would need to make a strong case. Otherrwise, they, along with the USOC, should just forget about it. But like I said earlier, the USOC was very largely prepared to have made LA the 2016 candidate instead of Chicago. I think that Chicago got lucky (well, in hindsight now, unlucky) to have been picked, since Ueberoth was bias in wanting a west coast candidate.

That said, I don't think that totally dismissing LA because 40 years is still not long enough for some, should just be tossed to the wayside that easily. Yeah, London waited 64 years, but if these things are suppose to be in some kind of ''chronological Olympic order'', then Paris should've been the one to have gotten 2012 N not London. So it's obvious that the IOC doesn't use that as a prime criteria rather than just a timetable. As long as a reasonable amount of time has passed, N 40 years is reasonable, then its worth looking into. But again, only if LA can come up with a compelling enough case. N we all seem to agree on that aspect.

AGREE! Thr conclution of all this long discution is that in a short term (2024, election in 2017) the USOC will try LA its the most logical city that has intrest... maybe it will fail, with strong bids... principally Toronto, Durban even Paris. But they stll have a chance... ;) I 'd really love to see the US hosting SOG in a short term ;)

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AGREE! Thr conclution of all this long discution is that in a short term (2024, election in 2017) the USOC will try LA its the most logical city that has intrest... maybe it will fail, with strong bids... principally Toronto, Durban even Paris. But they stll have a chance... ;) I 'd really love to see the US hosting SOG in a short term ;)

How can u jump to this conclusion?? :blink:

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How can u jump to this conclusion?? :blink:

Not jumping into this conclution, just imagining that this will be the conclution ;) all of us now that LA will th easiest option for the USOC eve when there are many cities that will be better... *cough* Chicago *cough* but their lack of intrest by the moment, for they might be scared for loosing againg perhaps... will leave them out of the 2024 race...

Anyways we'll wait to see first which will be the 2022 US candidate...

JUST SAYING IT'S PRETTY LIKELY BUT IT'S NOT THE FINAL CONCLUTION ;)

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This bears repeating:

We're in a holding pattern right now because everybody is waiting to see what the USOC does with the revenue deal and what their plans are regarding future bids.

Imagine the USOC comes out publicly and says, "We're very interested in 2024. All parties feel positive about the new revenue deal and we have built some great bridges with the IOC. The geopolitics and poor inter-organizational relationships that hampered the 2012 and 2016 campaigns are no longer issues. We believe any American candidate has an excellent chance of hosting the 2024 Games."

After hearing a statement like that, I think it's quite possible that multiple cities would start expressing interest. Until the USOC voices their intentions, however, there is absolutely no point in any city going public about a prospective bid. Everyone is waiting on the USOC -- as they should. I think it is definitely premature to say that LA would be the only interested city.

Of course it is still possible that LA will be the only qualified American candidate with Olympic ambitions. If that is the case, an LA bid can still be compelling, but the strategy must be very carefully thought through and implemented. The bid team and the USOC must identify their biggest challenges and devise an exciting and original plan that will be impossible to ignore.

Whether LA becomes the candidate uncontested or whether there's a long internal evaluation involving multiple cities -- either way, the US can seriously contend for 2024. If the will is there, there is a way. That wasn't true in 2012 or 2016, but I think it is true of 2024 onward.

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I really don't think that cities should have to wait for the "green light" from the USOC if there are cities out there that seriously want to bid for the 2024 Summer Games. On the contrary, if they're really serious, they should start looking into it now, or at the very least, relatively soon. Regardless if the USOC/IOC have yet to reach a revenue agreement.

Case in point, look at Denver. They have already formed a 2022 Exploratory Committee to see if it's even feasible & worthwhile to even start a bid, despite the USOC being in limbo about U.S. bids right now. So in case the USOC says; "okay, we're gonna bid", they already have cities to chose from & start their evaluation process right away, instead of starting from scratch & ho-humming along.

Olympic bids are serious stuff for any city & they shouldn't be taken lightly & rushed into, especially if you want to come up with a winnable & compelling Olympic bid. And while the USOC holds the "yes or no" key about another bid, they still need a city to go with if they say yes.

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The USOC has made it very clear that they are calling the shots regarding future bids (as they should). There still is no revenue deal and as a result all bid conversation is tabled. I do not believe we Gamesbidders are well enough connected to definitively state that no qualified Americsn city wants to host the Games in the next two decades.

Perhaps there will be a long drought, perhaps not. It's too early to know. My point is that IF a strong American candidate steps up to the plate for 2024 or 2028, it could have a good chance of winning and would be far more competitive than the poorly timed 2012 and 2016 bids.

If the USOC decides to put that message out, I think we'll see more interest. For now, though, we're stuck in a holding pattern-- at least until the USOC makes a declaration of intent.

Interesting, but not really surprising. That is a real sense I get from the USOC is, after getting their nose rubbed in the carpet by the IOC, they're content to go sulk in the corner for the next few Olympic cycles until the heavy hitters have all had a turn and the odds are better. With that in mind, what I am hoping is the USOC will also sit out the OWG cycles as well. I know, I know, SOME folks really want a Reno/Tahoe bid or even Denver, but even if the cities are game, I not as certain the USOC is, partially because of them sulking, but there is also the recent games in Vancouver as well.

Personally, especially with the US economy such a mess and, quite frankly, interest not being there from major cities, why should we stick our neck out for an Olympics? The US has had its share and I don't see a benefit right now.

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This bears repeating:

We're in a holding pattern right now because everybody is waiting to see what the USOC does with the revenue deal and what their plans are regarding future bids.

Imagine the USOC comes out publicly and says, "We're very interested in 2024. All parties feel positive about the new revenue deal and we have built some great bridges with the IOC. The geopolitics and poor inter-organizational relationships that hampered the 2012 and 2016 campaigns are no longer issues. We believe any American candidate has an excellent chance of hosting the 2024 Games."

After hearing a statement like that, I think it's quite possible that multiple cities would start expressing interest. Until the USOC voices their intentions, however, there is absolutely no point in any city going public about a prospective bid. Everyone is waiting on the USOC -- as they should. I think it is definitely premature to say that LA would be the only interested city.

See, I disagree with this. I think FYI has the right idea. Olympic bids aren't born out of the USOC declaring open season and saying "give us your best shot." If a city is looking into a 2024 bid (or a bid for a future Olympics), there's no reason to wait for the USOC to make it public. After what we saw with the 2020 process, I doubt we're going to see this all play out that way.

Like FYI brought up, look at Reno-Tahoe and Denver. They've been in long term planning mode for the Olympics and there was no 2018 and who knows what will happen with 2022. But that hasn't stopped them, especially Reno, from getting their ducks in a row so that if the USOC does open up a domestic bid process, they're all ready to go and have preparations in place. As opposed to a bid who waited and is only starting from scratch then. Many successful Olympic bids take years of planning before they even get to the bid process.

Then to use what we learned from 2020, and I know this is somewhat of a point of contention here.. we don't know what went on behind closed doors, before and after the USOC made a public statement saying they weren't fielding a bid. My feeling is still that they gauged interest, talking to the big cities like Chicago and New York and Los Angeles, and found that there wasn't a strong enough candidate out there, especially in light of other issues like the revenue deal. That's exactly what I believe will happen for 2024 (obviously 2022 comes first, but that's a different story altogether). It wouldn't be like the USOC to pick a candidate late in the game without having a full domestic bid process. So I think we'll get a pretty good sense in the next couple of years whether a bid is coming or not rather than the whole thing dragging out until a few weeks before the deadline.

In short.. everyone is NOT waiting on the USOC. NYC 2012's planning began as early as 1996. If a city wants to get into the game late, there's nothing stopping them from doing that, but they're going to be lagging behind those cities that already have been preparing. Plus, no one said a city has to focus solely on 2024. They could just as easily target 2028 and see what plays out before then and be even stronger if the USOC doesn't land a 2024 win.

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But you forget that the USOC is the gatekeeper. Without their OK, it's no go. Do I have to mention that maverick Las Vegas galoot, even if he had the City's backing? No go said the IOC...u can't go around their rep, the USOC. And it is the USOC's job when to know is the right time to advance a candidate. At some point, the cities in waiting and the moment the USOC wants to move forward will sync up...and that will be a "go" time.

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^^That still doesn't mean, BP, that potential candidates can't be ready, or at the very least, moving things along, in case the USOC does say "go", like Reno is doing now. It takes two to tango, ya know.

Oh, of course. And again, for a Winter bid, it takes a few less shells to line up for the game than for a Summer one.

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Whether or not cities "should have to wait for the green light from the USOC", I think that may be what's happening. After two huge defeats that were due largely to mistakes made by the USOC, I think cities see the USOC as responsible for righting the ship. It makes sense to wait and see what the USOC does before declaring intentions. Its the wise thing to do, considering recent history.

Both of the recent losses were for summer Games which are more competitive and higher profile contests. It makes perfect sense that potential winter candidates wouldn't feel so dissuaded. Summer candidates look at the losses and are afraid they see themselves in a mirror. Winter candidates assume (rightly or wrongly) that they're in a different boat and will be less affected by the issues that plagued 2012 and 2016.

I certainly wouldn't twist anybody's arm to bid, if no one wants the Games, fine. I'm not at all sure that's the case. I think people are just waiting to see what unfolds. It's crystal clear that a bid cannot succeed without a strong, healthy, supportive USOC. The last two bids didnt have that. I firmly believe the USOC is in the driver's seat. Its their job to show cities that they will be an asset rather than a hindrance.

As for an American bid "lagging behind", I really don't see it. We have such established sports organization in this country and so many resources that even a little over a year before the application deadline could be ample time to put together a bid that can win -- especially if the city has existing venues and prior experience. It all depends on the city, the leadership and the will. For some, the time frame might not be workable, but for the right combination it would be.

I also don't see the USOC as "sulking." Blackmun has publicly acknowledged that they made mistakes and they're trying to improve. Just because they're lying low at the moment and focusing on getting their house in order doesn't mean they're sulking.

When people are presented with an absence of information, there's a tendency to try to fill in the gaps. Some of the hypotheses may be interesting narratives, but that doesn't mean they're accurate. The truth is, there's a lot we don't know. Hence, the waiting.

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As for an American bid "lagging behind", I really don't see it. We have such established sports organization in this country and so many resources that even a little over a year before the application deadline could be ample time to put together a bid that can win -- especially if the city has existing venues and prior experience. It all depends on the city, the leadership and the will. For some, the time frame might not be workable, but for the right combination it would be.

Again, couldn't disagree more. If we were talking about the World Cup, then yes, it would be that easy. Because pretty much every big city has a large stadium, so all you really need to do is trim the list of potential candidates down to 10-12 and you have your World Cup.

But the Olympics require a lot more than that. A lot of cities have multiple arenas and other venues, but none have an 80,000 seat athletics stadium, most probably don't have a large enough aquatics center, and you also need plans for an Olympic Village. Those things aren't likely to come together in a short timeframe. Ask New York how that worked out for then and that was with a decade of planning before the vote in 2005.

And again, look at what we witnessed for the 2020 bidding. From what was made public (which as we well know, is not all the available information out there), there were cities out there at the very least in the planning stage. They were getting organized and set up so if the USOC did give the green light, they already had at least some of the necessary plans in place. They weren't waiting until that point to begin the planning process, that would be dumb. After all, what would have happened had the USOC struck a revenue deal before September. Then they may very well have been interested in bidding. Besides, how many times have we seen cities work on long term plans for an Olympics. USOC not bidding for 2020? No problem, we'll start concentrating on 2024. Isn't that exactly what Reno has been doing? I'm sure many of these cities, big or small, have tempered expectations over whether or not they can win the USOC nomination, let alone beat out the competition with the IOC, but that doesn't stop them from active planning, regardless or whether or not the USOC is accepting applications for the next available Olympics.

When people are presented with an absence of information, there's a tendency to try to fill in the gaps. Some of the hypotheses may be interesting narratives, but that doesn't mean they're accurate. The truth is, there's a lot we don't know. Hence, the waiting.

That's why they are hypotheses. If they were accurate, they wouldn't be hypotheses, they'd be facts. Of course there's a lot we don't know. But just because information and rhetoric haven't been made public doesn't mean that there aren't discussions going on behind the scenes. And if people here wants to make guesses and predictions, let them make guesses and predictions because that's all they are, nothing more.

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Whether or not cities "should have to wait for the green light from the USOC", I think that may be what's happening. After two huge defeats that were due largely to mistakes made by the USOC, I think cities see the USOC as responsible for righting the ship. It makes sense to wait and see what the USOC does before declaring intentions. Its the wise thing to do, considering recent history.

From what we know, this is an incorrect statement. Yeah, it's easy to blame the USOC. What do you think, they went in presenting their cities with the aim to lose? :rolleyes: It was a combination of factors...mostly larger ones that scuttled the NYC, Chicago and all the other losing bids.

Actually, in Chicago's case, I blame them for being so gullible in spending nearly all of their $76 million raised. That was kinda stupid. Of course, knowing that Tokyo spent double that to last one more round is some small comfort. Tokyo's staying in one more round was a $75 million effort.

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