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USA 2024


Athensfan
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Where was Atlanta's warm up track in 96? Just curious.

Good question. Officially, it was supposed to be either at the Morehouse College or Clark-Atlanta University (I forget which one)...among the upgraded facilities of Atlanta's black colleges complex. However, once I stumbled on a track a few blocks away called Cheney Stadium (part of Phoenix II Park), and I don't know that that was ever used. But it was only like 4 blocks away and u could walk it. (You can see it on Google maps. Not the best of neighborhoods, but it was closer than the black colleges.)

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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There is NO other place w/in SF borders which would accommodate an Oly stadium, a separate warm-up track, space for auxuliary facilities always involved with the main stadium, etc. .... SF is only like 43.7 sq. mi. -- a few sq.mi short of the magic '49.' ;)

Simple... you don't put the main stadium in the city limits of S.F. You but it in Berkley or Oakland.

And before anyone says but, but, but the charter says it has to be in the city limits... the IOC can blatatly ignore any "rule" they want, which you may notice[ in a few months when the 2014 games are hosted in Adler, Russia.

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Simple... you don't put the main stadium in the city limits of S.F. You but it in Berkley or Oakland.

And before anyone says but, but, but the charter says it has to be in the city limits... the IOC can blatatly ignore any "rule" they want, which you may notice[ in a few months when the 2014 games are hosted in Adler, Russia.

It's not "simple", cuz you have absolutely no idea what you're even 'proposing'.

It's not just a matter of the Charter, but by putting the stadium in Berkley or Oakland, you're then faced with the same huge logistical challenge that the Istanbul 2020 bid did with the Bosphorus proposal. How to get everyone back over the Bay Bridge to their accommodations & OV, in a timely & secure fashion, after the Ceremonies. Adler doesn't pose this huge problem to Sochi. So it's a moot example.

A bid would have to have either the OV AND the stadium over on the Berkley/Oakland side. Which even then the bid would then lack in the 3-5 star accommodations on that side of the Bay. But at that point, it's NO longer a "San Francisco" bid, but a Berkley/Oakland one. Just like the "Palo Alto" 2012 farce of a bid. I mean if it's that "simple", why not just use the new 49ners stadium in far-flung Santa Clarita. Oh yeah, cuz it's not really that simple afterall.

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It's not "simple", cuz you have absolutely no idea what you're even 'proposing'.

It's not just a matter of the Charter, but by putting the stadium in Berkley or Oakland, you're then faced with the same huge logistical challenge that the Istanbul 2020 bid did with the Bosphorus proposal. How to get everyone back over the Bay Bridge to their accommodations & OV, in a timely & secure fashion, after the Ceremonies. Adler doesn't pose this huge problem to Sochi. So it's a moot example.

The are extensive links between Berkley and SF, including the effing subway. It's as easy as getting back and forth between Manhattan and Queens.

Before the Olympics, Alder and Sochi were connected by a narrow road.

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One thing about Dallas, is we know they have the place to build everything: Fair Park.

I am somewhat pro-Dallas, just due to proximity to where I live and the fact that I could get up there quite easily, but realistically I don't think the USOC will choose Dallas (nor do I see Dallas coming off well on the world stage). Ah well.

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One thing about Dallas, is we know they have the place to build everything: Fair Park.

I am somewhat pro-Dallas, just due to proximity to where I live and the fact that I could get up there quite easily, but realistically I don't think the USOC will choose Dallas (nor do I see Dallas coming off well on the world stage). Ah well.

Too bad Larry Hagman is dead...imagine J.R. Ewing as ambassador for a Dallas bid :-)

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The are extensive links between Berkley and SF, including the effing subway. It's as easy as getting back and forth between Manhattan and Queens.

But it's not going to be as F'ing "easy" come crunch time when the start of the mass exodus occurs. Why bother making an already logistical headache into a migraine when you can have everything either on one side or the other making things that much easier.

Before the Olympics, Alder and Sochi were connected by a narrow road.

Least we forget that Putin has dropped $50 Billion to make Sochi ("Adler") into a Winter Olympic playground.

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It's not "simple", cuz you have absolutely no idea what you're even 'proposing'.

It's not just a matter of the Charter, but by putting the stadium in Berkley or Oakland, you're then faced with the same huge logistical challenge that the Istanbul 2020 bid did with the Bosphorus proposal. How to get everyone back over the Bay Bridge to their accommodations & OV, in a timely & secure fashion, after the Ceremonies. Adler doesn't pose this huge problem to Sochi. So it's a moot example.

A bid would have to have either the OV AND the stadium over on the Berkley/Oakland side. Which even then the bid would then lack in the 3-5 star accommodations on that side of the Bay. But at that point, it's NO longer a "San Francisco" bid, but a Berkley/Oakland one. Just like the "Palo Alto" 2012 farce of a bid. I mean if it's that "simple", why not just use the new 49ners stadium in far-flung Santa Clarita. Oh yeah, cuz it's not really that simple afterall.

I don't know why we can't all think of the things our mega-MENSA member, zekel, does. I am absolutely staggered by the originality and brilliance of his ideas...or lack of them. :lol::lol:

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The are extensive links between Berkley and SF, including the effing subway. It's as easy as getting back and forth between Manhattan and Queens.

Before the Olympics, Alder and Sochi were connected by a narrow road.

Maybe now, but add a couple hundred thousand more people and that spells N.I.G.H.T.M.A.R.E

One thing about Dallas, is we know they have the place to build everything: Fair Park.

I am somewhat pro-Dallas, just due to proximity to where I live and the fact that I could get up there quite easily, but realistically I don't think the USOC will choose Dallas (nor do I see Dallas coming off well on the world stage). Ah well.

They do have that, but I'm with you Dallas (like Atlanta; despite the fact I would kinda like to see them host again) would not come off too well with the world. I think LA is the strongest bid next to Boston. Just hope LA does not have a crappy logo like they did for 2016: 1018px-Lalogo2016.png

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They do have that, but I'm with you Dallas (like Atlanta; despite the fact I would kinda like to see them host again) would not come off too well with the world. I think LA is the strongest bid next to Boston. Just hope LA does not have a crappy logo like they did for 2016: 1018px-Lalogo2016.png

I disagree with you. I like that logo. It conveys LA. The only thing I would've changed is to have the two palms reflected in a pair of darkglasses -- and that would make it even more truly and doubly L.A.

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Maybe now, but add a couple hundred thousand more people and that spells N.I.G.H.T.M.A.R.E

You could say that about every city. Nobody has spare capacity fro a couple hundred thousand extra people. You think London did? Beijing? That's why the Olympics have extensive traffic plans to deal with this stuff.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Olympics-USOC says intends to bid for 2024 Summer Games

Dec 3 (Reuters) - The United States will bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics as long as they find a candidate city that meets necessary conditions, United States Olympic Committee (USOC) chairman Larry Probst said on Tuesday.

The USOC has a long list of criteria that a candidate city must meet but with several cities expressing strong interest in a bid and encouragement from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) it seems almost certain the United States will try to land its first Summer Games since 1996.

"It is our intention to bid for 2024 if all the elements we talked about previously are in place," Probst said during a conferencelb_icon1.png call following the USOC's final board meeting of the year in San Francisco.

"That obviously includes, do we have the right message, do we have the right technical plan, do we have the right leaders, do we have the financial support of the local community, do we have governmental support, so a lot of things have to fall in place.

Earlier this year, the USOC sent letters to the mayors of America's 35 biggest cities to gauge interest in bidding for the 2024 Games.

Dallas, Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Washington, San Diego and Tulsa have expressed varying degrees of interest in hosting the sporting extravaganza.

USOC chief executive officer Scott Blackmun confirmed reports that a delegation has visited several cities and will be making more visits in December and January.

"We said before that there are less than 10 cities that we are having discussions with and it has been reported we have visited a handful of those cities," said Blackmun. "We're on track to make our decision by the end of 2014 as to whether we want to bid and if we do who our city would be.

"We don't want to have discussions about individual cities at this point because some of those cities may not like to go forward and we prefer that the discussions not be made public."

The USOC has spent several years patching up strained relationships with the IOC that contributed to embarrassing rebukes to New York in its bid to stage the 2012 Olympics and Chicago's failed attempt for the 2016 Games.

Both Probst and Blackmun have spent years mending fences and believe the time is right to test the goodwill they have built.

"We need to continue being present and being engaged," said Blackmun. "Larry has spent a lot of time on the road, I have spent a lot of time on the road and we are enjoying being more involved than we have been if you look back over the last five or 10 years.

"We just need to continue to be at the meetings and participate."

The USOC emphasized that it will take a slow, methodical approach to identifying a candidate.

Blackmun said the USOC could trim the list of possible candidates following the Feb. 7-23 Sochi Winter Games.

The next Summer Olympics will be held in Rio in 2016 while 2020 Games were awarded to Tokyo in September.

The U.S. would be considered a strong contender for 2024 but is sure to face stiff competition from several cities including potential bids Rome, Paris, Doha, Dubai and Durban, South Africa.

The decision on the 2024 host will not be made until 2017

Reuters

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1. Seems like they're taking quite a different tack this time, which is good.

2. I'm still somewhat skeptical the US will actually bid. I think they'd like to see who the competition is first.

1. It was just as methodical the last 2 times. I mean it's even more difficult now since #1 and #2/3 aren't in there.

2. That's the crux of it -- see who the US will be up against. (If the USOC goes for 2024, I think it might be #1 - Boston, #2 - Philadelphia.)

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