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USA 2024


Athensfan
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Oh, please. U've been brain-washed by that virulent anti-Reno renegade.

#1 - It'll be covered in snow.

#2 - The money shots will be in the Lake; and the broadcasts in Reno will be from the inside venues.

#3 - As you said, the Games won't be for another 14 years; so you don't think a town can prettify itself? What are Hollywood and Vegas designers for? Duh!! Think outside the box.

I've been the pictures. It must be a worldwide Global media conspiracy.

What will all those venues be used for after the games?

Denver and Reno/Tahoe have been at this for DECADES. Salt Lake obviously got theirs, so take from that what you want. It's not impossible that another city will come to the forefront, but those cities are going to have their own baggage, and that's if they can even hope to meet the technical requirements (both written and unwritten) to host a Winter Olympics. I don't see it happening in the 21st Century.

And gromit, as a new poster, a fair warning to you.. baron wants nothing more than to see an Olympics in the Reno/Lake Tahoe area and he will fight to the death to convince the world that needs to happen. So if you're looking to have that argument with him as many of us have had here before, do so at your own peril.

Denver had their chance. And rejected it. Reno/LakeTahoe may have been at it for decades but that does not always increase their chance. Sweden have been too and are still no closer

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The IOC loves to revisit previous Games sites; two St. Mortiz's, two Lake Placids, two Norway's, 3 Innsbrucks, 2 French Alps towns, and if (bloody) Munich 2022 might happen, why should a revisit of the Squaw Valley 1960 environs be such a distant thing?

And baron.. you know better than to twist history like that. The 2nd St. Moritz (which is ancient history at this point) was a choice born out of finding a site neutral to WWII parties. Lake Placid won 1980 without a competition. And the 2nd Innsbruck, well we know why that happened. So I would call that precedent for Sac-Tah-Reno.

Denver had their chance. And rejected it. Reno/LakeTahoe may have been at it for decades but that does not always increase their chance. Sweden have been too and are still no closer

Oh please, I don't buy that logic. That was 40 years ago. If you want to scrutinize a bid for half a century later as if it's the same thing, that's fine. But you can't dismiss them outright because of it. Nor does that prop up another city's chances just because you have no faith in Denver.

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It is simply not true that the Winter Games "must" come back to the US soon and therefore a Summer bid should not be considered.

The US doesn't have to bid. The IOC isn't obligated to choose an American Winter bid. Much as some people are wedded to the idea of regular, symmetrical continental rotation, it simply is not a necessity -- or even the IOC's highest priority. The IOC has said and demonstrated that on multiple occasions.

If your best argument for Reno is "Hey, the city's ugly, but it'll be covered in snow" -- that gives the USOC the perfect reason to keep looking at Summer options. Besides, snow may hide a cabin nicely, but a city of cheap CASINOS? Think again.

As for 2022, people are in denial if they say the only reason the US passed on it was to buy more time to smooth things over with the IOC. What happened to the fact that the USOC said they wanted to keep their 2020 options open on case the revenue deal came through in time? I'm sure some will say "the US never had any intention of considering 2020 -- it was a negotiating tactic." if that is true, then why did the USOC ultimately agree to such a lousy deal that so obviously favors the IOC? Plus, all things being equal, the simplest explanation is usually the right one.

What's simpler? The USOC lied about 2020 to get a leg up on the IOC and then passed on 2022 to get more time to butter up the IOC?

Or...

The USOC didnt bid for 2020 because the revenue deal wasn't done and passed on 2022 because they felt other bids would be stronger.

To me, all the USOC's recent actions (including their last two bids) suggest they would prefer Summer Games. I strongly feel a Summer bid is the best course of action for them to pursue. Settling for the consolation prize is not what the US needs right now and will set a bad precedent for future IOC relations as well. They caved on the revenue deal. They can't cave on the bid.

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Oh please, I don't buy that logic. That was 40 years ago. If you want to scrutinize a bid for half a century later as if it's the same thing, that's fine. But you can't dismiss them outright because of it. Nor does that prop up another city's chances just because you have no faith in Denver.

I'm didn't say I reject Denver. But it will be a question which will be asked.

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And what exactly is the question that will be asked? "Say Denver, will you reject the Olympics again?" Because that's a pretty stupid question.

Why is it a pretty stupid question?

Who is going to pay for the extra facilities?

Who is going to agree to funds which might be needed to bail out the games as happened with Salt Lake?

Having once voted to reject the games what guarantee would Denver be able to give that history would not repeat itself especially now that the Winter Olympics are bigger and more expensive?

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If they hold a referendum, they do it BEFORE the bid. They pledge not to have one after the Games are awarded. All levels of government pledge their support and financial guarantees. Problem solved.

Remember it's simply not the same citizenry calling the shots this time. There's no reason to expect them to view things the same way people did 40 years ago.

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And baron.. you know better than to twist history like that.

Twist? Did I state anything not factual? Those stats are right, regardless of the varying circumstances, and why shouldn't a return to the area be possible? I mean Beijing wasn't exactly a beauty queen city. London is only 'beautiful' in a man-made way. It's Olympic Park was a vast wasteland. Rio has its share of favelas, etc., etc. .so I totally reject this very superficial reason of AF. Such a shallow observation.

And @AF, you've studied costume design. You surely know what set decorators are and what they can do. Why is it not possible to employ their services for an urban beautification effort, if only for 4 weeks or longer??

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Twist? Did I state anything not factual? Those stats are right, regardless of the varying circumstances, and why shouldn't a return to the area be possible? I mean Beijing wasn't exactly a beauty queen city. London is only 'beautiful' in a man-made way. It's Olympic Park was a vast wasteland. Rio has its share of favelas, etc., etc. .so I totally reject this very superficial reason of AF. Such a shallow observation.

Well, you said the IOC loves to revisit previous sites. The last 2 Winter Olympics to be awarded are Winter firsts. St. Moritz and Innbruck were less about the IOC wanting to return there as it was a forced decision. It's not a knock against Reno-Tahoe, but it's also not something that I could see helping them make their case.

Why is it a pretty stupid question?

Who is going to pay for the extra facilities?

Who is going to agree to funds which might be needed to bail out the games as happened with Salt Lake?

Having once voted to reject the games what guarantee would Denver be able to give that history would not repeat itself especially now that the Winter Olympics are bigger and more expensive?

Like I said, those first 2 questions are stupid because they apply to any and every potential bid city. Why do those questions apply any more to Denver than they do to Reno-Tahoe or Munich or whoever else? The 3rd question is somewhat valid, but again, that's something they have to take care of before they get to that part of the process. As Athens noted, if they can't guarantee that to the USOC, their bid won't get off the ground. If the public and financial support isn't there, there's no bid to begin with. So that folks in Denver have been thinking about this for awhile (and since 4 decades is a long time), it should be no more than a footnote for the IOC, not a question against Denver's credibility. Is it possible some IOC voters will factor that into their decision? Maybe, but that's nothing more significant than the normal course of geo-politics IMO.

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You surely know what set decorators are and what they can do. Why is it not possible to employ their services for an urban beautification effort, if only for 4 weeks or longer??

What you're suggesting is a modern-day Potemkin village. And it would require an insane budget. The problem isn't just how the city looks. It's what the city IS. There's just not a whole lot to do there apart from blackjack and slot machines.

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What you're suggesting is a modern-day Potemkin village. And it would require an insane budget. The problem isn't just how the city looks. It's what the city IS. There's just not a whole lot to do there apart from blackjack and slot machines.

All Olympic host cities "Potemkimize" for their moment in the sun. I disagree that it would require an outrageous budget; it can be done reasonably.

- There are great shows as well; a couple of Cirque du Soleil shows. Other artists (the Bolshoi; La Scala) and concerts will be performing.

- China will send a pair of pandas.

- I am sure arrangements can be made with the Met, the d'Orsay or the Louvre or the Hermitage to send a travelling show.

- Guests will be there to attend the Games, and gambling is just part of the apres sport! How different is that when they've held IOC sessions in Monte Carlo? At least everyone will be able to get in...unlike London where you have to belong to a club to gamble. Please, a Reno-Tahoe setting will be VERY laissez-faire!

And if anything, betting on who will win the downhill or the slalom or the curling or the ice dancing, etc. would make these the most exciting and interactive SOGs in history.

You need more fun and distraction than that?

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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It's true we haven't heard anything from Summer candidates, but why would we? Everyone was gearing up for 2022 and the USOC pulled the plug. Then the USOC says there won't be a formal domestic process and that everything will be done behind closed doors. Why would any city go public?

That's not entirely true. There have been some news pieces that Los Angeles & Philadelphia could explore the options, & then the total opposite side of the spectrum where Rahm Emmanuel's office in Chicago flat-out said that the city was not at all interested in pursuing the Olympics again anytime soon.

The USOC did pull out for 2022, but they did say that they would look into 2024 AND 2026. Most likely, knowing full-well that 2024 might not happen bcuz a worthwhile candidate may not come forward, but then they would have 2026 to fall back on, considering that they already have 3 interested parties in the winter category. Plus, 2026 would favor North America much moreso than 2022, & that could very well be another reason Y the USOC said no in bidding for those Games.

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That's not entirely true. There have been some news pieces that Los Angeles & Philadelphia could explore the options, & then the total opposite side of the spectrum where Rahm Emmanuel's office in Chicago flat-out said that the city was not at all interested in pursuing the Olympics again anytime soon.

The USOC did pull out for 2022, but they did say that they would look into 2024 AND 2026. Most likely, knowing full-well that 2024 might not happen bcuz a worthwhile candidate may not come forward, but then they would have 2026 to fall back on, considering that they already have 3 interested parties in the winter category. Plus, 2026 would favor North America much moreso than 2022, & that could very well be another reason Y the USOC said no in bidding for those Games.

I don't disagree with any of that, but I think the tid-bits of info are so minimal that just about anything could happen. I wouldn't be surprised if LA and Philly weren't interested and Chicago did a 180. There just isn't much information.

There's really no way to handicap 2024 vs. 2026 either. I do think that if the USOC felt any of the Winter candidates were truly outstanding they would have gone for 2022. Just my opinion.

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... considering that they already have 3 interested parties in the winter category.

Denver or Reno (and the lake right next to it) 2026 can make it work considering the fact that the 2022 will be in Europe. I really hope that the US will go for a 2024 bid. Can Chicago try again? Can the USOC choose a city and "prep" it to bid? Is that possible? It sounded kinda tyrannical though.

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Denver or Reno (and the lake right next to it) 2026 can make it work considering the fact that the 2022 will be in Europe. I really hope that the US will go for a 2024 bid. Can Chicago try again? Can the USOC choose a city and "prep" it to bid? Is that possible? It sounded kinda tyrannical though.

I don't think that's necessarily tyrannical. I think that's the way you put together a winning bid.

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Any NOC in any country had to decide whether or not it'll "support" a bid from its country. It's all very well for any city to say it wants to bid, but the bid won't get anywhere if the NOC doesn't support it (look what happened to Las Vegas 2020). It's not a uniquely American problem - all NOC's can be considered "tyrannical" in that they get last say on whether their country should proceed with a bid or not. Australia's NOC, for example, chose to put Sydney up for the the 2000 bid without a domestic vote or asking any other cities if they wanted a go - which pissed Melburnians off a lot at the time.

Edited by Sir Rols
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^ there was still a great deal of fairness in Sydney being given the 2000 candidacy over Melbourne and Brisbane - the last three Australian bids were by the latter two (Melbourne had permission to bid for 1988 but backed out), and Sydney being the largest city+international face of Australia was simply the obvious choice. Although- I've always speculated at what would have happened with a Sydney 2000 loss - I think the AOC would have maintained and put Sydney up for 2004.

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^ there was still a great deal of fairness in Sydney being given the 2000 candidacy over Melbourne and Brisbane - the last three Australian bids were by the latter two (Melbourne had permission to bid for 1988 but backed out), and Sydney being the largest city+international face of Australia was simply the obvious choice. Although- I've always speculated at what would have happened with a Sydney 2000 loss - I think the AOC would have maintained and put Sydney up for 2004.

That would've really put the cat amongst the pigeons. I think we would have sat out 2004 - Coates said often during the campaign that 2000 was going to be our last shot. Factor a bit of gamesmanship in that, but I reckon they would've realized that Oz's chances for 2004 would have been slim at best if Beijing had got the Millenium Games.

For 2008 I reckon there would have been pressure to bid again. And I don't doubt Melbourne would have been determined to be given another shot. I don't knw if Sydney would have had the stomach to go for it again. This would have been under Bob Carr as premier, and he was always sports- averse/ uninterested.

Sorry, just realized this was the USA thread, sorry to go off-topic.

Edited by Sir Rols
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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/23/sports/olympics/which-us-city-most-deserves-the-olympics.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

An article for possible cities for both occasions, 2024 and 2026

Springfield 2024?

Which U.S. City Most Deserves the Olympics?

Not everyone thinks of Austin as a city for winter sports. There is the decided lack of snow, for one thing. And the average December-January temperatures range from 41 to 62. But, why not? If we set American ingenuity to the task, we can certainly come up with a polymer that would do the job, some petroleum-based product that would be powdery and slick, so that people can Ski the Hill Country.

If the powder is black instead of pearly white, well, skiers can adjust. And black is slimming.

Placing trails in the Balcones fault zone would give visitors the amazing experience of live music, good food and a laid-back lifestyle enjoyed by the hordes who travel each year to the South by Southwest festival. What’s more, the International Olympic Committee would be able to take advantage of Central Texas’s temperate climate to broaden the scope and appeal of the Winter Games by hosting sports normally associated with the Summer Games. Like beach volleyball.

If inner tubing is declared an Olympic sport — and why not? — nearby New Braunfels beckons. Downhill skiers may find that the 10-gallon Stetsons they wear during the competition could give them a touch of aerodynamic lift. Whether the athletes’ performances would suffer from giving in to the temptations offered by late-night revelry and Shiner Bock beer is a question that could be answered only by giving Austin a chance. But it might be time for bold thinking. It might be time for the Hill Country Olympics. JOHN SCHWARTZ

Portland, Ore.

Why pump iron when you can pump irony? America’s most self-consciously hip city is too cool for athletic competition — Trail Blazers history makes more sense once you realize this — but people in Portland will happily fit some sports between trips from the organic grocery to the feminist bookshop, so long as we acknowledge that they are appreciating the events on a different level. Special event: the individualist freestyle, in which everyone does his own thing and no one is judged. For an alternate site in the Pacific Northwest, consider Forks, Wash., the setting of the “Twilight” series. The city has made a business model out of busing around moody, emaciated teenagers, giving it the perfect infrastructure for supporting gymnastics teams. MIKE TANIER

Riverside Park, Manhattan

Why limit Olympic bids to cities? How about my urban backyard? I’m talking about Riverside Park in Manhattan, which has a great sledding hill at 108th Street. It’s perfect for the 2026 Winter Games.

We can host skating because the site borders the Hudson River, which freezes, sort of. At least close to shore. In chunks. Lasker Rink is close by, for hockey, if we can get the rabid youth league parents to clear out.

We’ve got great security. Park rangers, when they are around, are scrupulous at ticketing for off-leash dogs in the wrong spots. There are a few single-room occupancy hotels left amid the gentrification to house athletes. A nice snack bar overlooks the scenic Hudson.

I know the I.O.C. is sensitive about sparse crowds, especially after Turin in 2006, when skiers pumped their arms to empty stands. But check out the youth baseball and youth soccer parents on the park’s lowest level! They are dedicated fans. We are also used to large crowds. A million people attended the dedication of Grant’s Tomb, in 1897.

The Riverside bid has a lot going for it. The I.O.C. likes bringing the Games to places for the first time. This patch of land off the American continent fits that category, after the collapse of Mayor Bloomberg’s Olympic hopes for New York City. The committee also favors putting the Winter Olympics in urban areas. With a population density of more than 150 people per acre, the Upper West Side fits the bill.

We may not have presidents named Putin to lobby for the bid, but we do have Daniel J. O’Donnell, the local state assemblyman. Not enough star power? We can ask him to bring in his sister Rosie.

The I.O.C. likes a hook. Pyeongchang, South Korea, won the 2018 Winter Games in part because it could be seen as promoting harmony on the divided Korean Peninsula. The Riverside Park Games could heal the rift between New York and New Jersey. The Games would also be a boost to a park often in the shadow of its swankier cousin, Central Park.

If Riverside Park does get the Olympics, think of the money and productivity that would be saved. When Rio de Janeiro was picked for the 2016 Games, a local holiday was declared. Cranky Upper West Siders probably wouldn’t care. DANIEL J. WAKIN

East Rutherford, N.J.

Finally, the Winter Olympics come inside where they belong, out of the cold, all thanks to the 2026 East Rutherford Games.

With a few tweaks — such as a retractable roof on the Meadowlands football stadium, regrettably and controversially left topless when built — the first Jersey Olympics could be the first all-indoor Olympics. There will be a coat check.

The possibilities are obvious: skiing at the indoor ski hill/turnpike eyesore that is near the stadium. Hockey and figure skating inside the Izod Center, best known as the onetime home of the Brooklyn Nets. Moguls and aerials down the bleachers at MetLife Stadium. Luge, skeleton and bobsled down the stadium’s ramps, or over in the parking garage. (For midwinter scheduling purposes, organizers can be reasonably assured that the Jets will not be playing host to any late-January games.)

Even the Olympic demonstration sport of pole dancing could take place at a nearby gentleman’s club.

Cartoonish, lovable Olympic mascots are already in place: Snooki and The Situation, Gov. Chris Christie and Rex Ryan, the Jersey housewives and the tanning mom.

The Olympic torch already burns brightly atop the refineries down by Newark Liberty Airport. The athletes’ village would be in Hoboken, well versed in attracting upstanding young people from as far away as Piscataway. Bruce Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi could perform nightly, which they sometimes do in the stadium, anyway. The logo could be colorful Olympic rings subtly arranged in the shape of brass knuckles.

Fans would have plenty to see and do, beyond the Olympic events, such as “Sopranos” tours, off-track betting at the Meadowlands Racetrack and visits to area rest stops. Area food choices are as varied as a diner menu. The more adventurous may consider an excursion to the Olympic-wannabe city of New York, forever fated to second-class status because of its failed bid for the 2012 Summer Games.

Sure, some think of East Rutherford as better suited for the Summer Olympics. There could be kayak and canoe competitions in the swamp, rowing races on the Hackensack River and shooting events in the streets of Paterson. A revamped triathlon could include a cab ride through the Lincoln Tunnel, a swim across the Hudson River and a precarious bike ride on the nonexistent shoulder of Route 3 back to the stadium.

But no one would attend, not in August, because everyone would be at the shore.

(The writer has lived, proudly, in New Jersey for seven years.) JOHN BRANCH

Springfield

People from every country on earth go to the Olympics, and to get them to come to America we need to hold the Games at a city they all look to.

That city is Springfield.

The infrastructure is virtually all in place. Clean, efficient energy will be supplied by the Nuclear Power Plant. Public transportation could be provided by the monorail, assuming they get the bugs out. Drug testing could be handled by the nearly competent Dr. Nick Riviera. And it could all be catered by Krusty Burger.

Admittedly, the facilities for an international multisport event are lacking. The baseball stadium of the minor league Springfield Isotopes could be used for the opening ceremony. And the International Olympic Committee may want to think about adding dog racing, bowling and miniature golf to the Games.

But more stadiums could be built with the money of the town billionaire C. Montgomery Burns, assuming he is in the midst of one of his periodic efforts to improve his image.

We can see it now: the action star Rainier Wolfcastle hands the torch to the heavyweight champion Drederick Tatum, who signals the start of the Games by igniting the mountain of tires at the Springfield Tire Yard.

What could be more American? VICTOR MATHER

Sedona, Ariz.

Combine athletic excellence, your spoiled niece’s wedding and your midlife crisis into one inspiring event! Instead of gold, silver and bronze medals, winners receive silver pendants for first place, turquoise bracelets for second and, for third, kitschy amethyst-and-pewter pendants made by former Long Islanders who took community college extension classes in Navajo art. Watch as the setting sun casts dramatic shadows over eternal landscape features like the Red Rocks and Bob Costas. Special event: the cognitive dissonance balance beam, in which aging flower children try to shift in midsentence from “this ethereal landscape has allowed me to transcend material needs” to “that Hope Solo petrified wood sculpture costs $600” without falling over sideways. MIKE TANIER

New Orleans

Amid all the talk of American cities hosting the Olympics, there is no doubt that New Orleans is the clear choice for the 2024 Summer Games. The Winter Games would be my preference, but the United States is already out of the 2022 bidding, and things here don’t always get done right on the old nose, so 2022 would have been pushing it anyway.

So Summer 2024 it is. This is a very sports-oriented city, though it may not be obvious at first glance. There are the Saints, the Hornets and a succession of major sporting events in the Superdome. There is also the athletic endurance of the citizens themselves, who can sit and watch these sports — often while drinking — for hours at a time.

Let us begin with the opening ceremony, which in all likelihood has already started somewhere. The ceremony for the New Orleans Games will of course go on for more than one day, and in lieu of militaristic fanfare and synchronized choreography, this one will consist of street parades, a citywide crab boil and free late-night concerts in dive bars around town.

Unlike other ceremonies, this will truly be a party for everyone, athletes included. I picture the cyclists, their thoughts turned to the individual pursuit, saying, “You know, a fried shrimp po’boy would probably put a serious damper on my speed.” To which the folks at Parkway Bakery and Tavern would say: “Probably. Do you want that dressed?”

It will be the opening ceremony against which all others are judged, and it will continue not only through the first week but also through the closing ceremony and for some weeks after that, at least until Voodoo Fest.

There may also be some sports, but probably not, as it is really humid here in the summertime. CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

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Denver or Reno (and the lake right next to it) 2026 can make it work considering the fact that the 2022 will be in Europe. I really hope that the US will go for a 2024 bid. Can Chicago try again? Can the USOC choose a city and "prep" it to bid? Is that possible? It sounded kinda tyrannical though.

I don't think that's necessarily tyrannical. I think that's the way you put together a winning bid.

It's extremely tyrannical. And no, it is not possible, especially in the United States. It's not the way to put together a winning bid.

Let's say the USOC has their heart set on New York. They can't make that decision and worry about the details later. If there's no interest from the city and no one who wants to lead the bid efforts, it's not like the USOC can say "work with us" and make it happen that way. Now if they find someone from the city, either a business owner and/or someone from a government agency, then maybe you have something. But the decision needs to come from the city to initiate the planning process. Then the USOC can get involved. Unlike other countries (case in point, Australia) where the NOC is going to fund the bid and do most of the dirty work, we know with the USOC a lot of it is on the city. So the USOC needs a willing partner, not just the city they feel like targeting. That's why the Australian NOC could say "we're going with Sydney" whereas the USOC can't say "we're going with New York." Again, if there's no real interest from the city in question (and who knows.. maybe somewhere that's a person or an organization that will hear the USOC calling and that will spark their intrigue), the USOC is not in a position to run the bid for them.

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