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Lord Seb - future IOC member/pres?


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I never realised Coe had said these things. I guess he was just offering his honest opinions but maybe it would have been better to have kept them a bit more private.

Perhaps, contrary to what a lot of people seem to think, he has no ambitions to run the IOC and so feels he can be more candid and public about his views and opinions?

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Interesting item I came across today speculating on Seb's future in the Olympic movement: A few comments. I certainly agree that Seb is an obvious candidate for IOC membership. It would be almost a

Considering that London is hosting in 2012 and the UK isn't likely to figure into the bidding for decades, I'd say that this would be the safest time to have 5 Brits in the IOC.

Gianna was great (even if she wasn't capable of moving many facial muscles). I liked Coe immensely right up until the end of London's preparations. In my opinion, it's poor form for the leader of an

What a dunderhead Coe is. I NEVER really liked him. For that idiotic remark alone, he SHOULD be disqualified from the IOC!! He is too Athletics-centered.

lol! Well I'm not sure I'd go that far! But right, his unwillingness to delcare Phelps the greatest ever, seemed sly! He showed his diplomatic skills were a little lacking! Then went on to praise Athletics-based stars of past and present!

I thought it was a little tactless!

Perhaps, contrary to what a lot of people seem to think, he has no ambitions to run the IOC and so feels he can be more candid and public about his views and opinions?

I can see where you're coming from, but for a former politican I am surprised by some of his off-the-cuff remarks! I will be honest, I did see him as an IOC President in waiting. But not anymore! As is suggested, he's too Athletics centric (the IAAF is perfect for him).

Edited by Michelle
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Coe's eccentric father Percy would tell anyone who would listen (and even those who were trying not to) that his son was the greatest middle distance runner the world had ever seen. I think Coe still believe believes it...

He's always been hard to like, a tactician, who often sounds arrogant about his days as a competitor. Many people preferred the battler, Steve Ovett, who learnt to love running speeding his way to the corner shop to get cigarettes and booze for his dad. I've only seen recordings and docudramas, but I can how the streak of narcissism served him well for being LOCOG chair. You need to be something of an egomaniac to butt heads with government departments. Kudos to the often maligned Barbara Cassani, who persuaded the then Labour government to take on a Tory as her replacement. I think he approached Singapore like one of his races, and the calculation worked.

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I cannot honestly see him as IAAF president either. Sergei Bubka is the far more likely candidate especially since they moved heaven and earth to get him his VP place over a female Canadian last time. Including rerunning the election.

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Sebastian Coe is not an IOC member for a very good reason.

He was an athlete, a real one.

Don't you know that's forbidden for the IOC! You must be a prince at least to get him and you musn't have entered the games! and on top of it you musn't musn't have won some medals!

How would the Emperor of Ireland, the King of Switzerland, the Tsar of Mexico and the sultan of Australia would feel & look if they have someone without a tittle & who actually participate in the olympics & did well sitting next to them????

Surely the Queen has a grandchildren she can marry to Coe & give him a tittle?

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Coe has a title. Baron, styled as The Lord Coe KBE.

And just to point out how wrong you are.

Thomas Bach - gold medal 1976 fencing

Claudia Bokel - silver medal 2004 fencing

Sergey Bubka - gold medal 1988 pole vault

Anita DeFrantz - bronze medal 1976 rowing

Guy Drut - gold and silver medalist 1972 and 76 athletics

Hicham El Guerrouj - double gold and silver medalist 2000 and 04 athletics

Nawal el Moutawakel - gold medal 1984 athletics

Frankie Fredericks - 4x silver medalist 1992 and 96 athletics

Kevan Gosper - silver medal 1956 athletics

Barbara Kendall - gold, silver and bronze medalist 1992, 96, 00 sailing

Jean Claude Killy - 3x gold medalist 1968 skiing

I don't think I need to go on.

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On the opposite i want you to go on please.

Please continue the list.

Currently only 40 Members of the 113 active members of IOC participated in any Olympiad.

Most of them are on that list because of the Athletes Commission that Samarach created only in 1981 to make sure there is actually some sportsman in the IOC.

So two-thirds of the people who will vote for either Madrid, Istanbul or Tokyo to host a huge sport event have never been in olympics or even been doing real sport except footing.

And on the 40 members who did participate, a few of them are a real joke like Prince Albert II in bobsleigh.

So yes please continue the list, because as i see it, any one in the Windsor family has more chance to become an IOC member than someone behind such great games like London has.

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So yes please continue the list, because as i see it, any one in the Windsor family has more chance to become an IOC member than someone behind such great games like London has.

Well, I don't think just anyone, even in the Windsor family. Princess Anne is an IOC member but she did take part in the 1976 Montreal Olympics in the equestrian events. I think all the royal members of the IOC have had at least some active involvement as an Olympic athlete. But I tend to agree that having a royal title is very likely an advantage over those athletes who have not.

Edited by Mainad
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The thing is, I think it's only the IOC president who is paid a salary. All the others, only their expenses are paid by the IOC; but they are strictly 'voluntary' (i.e., no salary) positions--thus the reason that aristocrats and industrialists (all who have means of support while they are partying and convocating) are chosen to serve.

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Well, I don't think just anyone, even in the Windsor family. Princess Anne is an IOC member but she did take part in the 1976 Montreal Olympics in the equestrian events. I think all the royal members of the IOC have had at least some active involvement as an Olympic athlete. But I tend to agree that having a royal title is very likely an advantage over those athletes who have not.

But it is highly unlikely that another member of the Windsor family would be appointed to the IOC. One would be seen as "enough."

And, regarding Seb Coe's inappropriate remarks, the head of an OC should never have an opinion aobut his/her country's athletes or the IOC....his/her job is to be an impartial OC leader, mostly cheerleading for the Games, and never becoming mired in specific athletes or countries.....

The thing is, I think it's only the IOC president who is paid a salary. All the others, only their expenses are paid by the IOC; but they are strictly 'voluntary' (i.e., no salary) positions--thus the reason that aristocrats and industrialists (all who have means of support while they are partying and convocating) are chosen to serve.

That's part of the reason they are picked, but the most important reason is that the IOC (and past and current presidents) like to be seen with "royalty" surrounding them, and keeping the IOC well above the mobs.

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Let's not forget Lord Coe was a Conservative (Right Wing) politician for 5 years in the 1990s.

He is one of the most popular men in Britain and the moment following the Olympic's success.

You never know...might we one day see Prime Minister Sebastian Coe?

(Plus he is only 55)

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Interesting... Does that mean Bach could be the first Olympic medalist to be IOC President? I know of only two other Olympians to be IOC President - Rogge and Brundage, neither of whom medaled. Be interesting to see if this is the start of a trend for the IOC, less a country club, more self governance by athletes who participated in the Games and learned how to represent their sports and the Olympic movement.

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Just because you medal at an Olympics doesn't automatically make you a good sports administrator - which is what is needed to be IOC chief. In saying that, Bach clearly demonstrates he has the skills. I can't imagine who will challenge Bach next year.

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Did Coe receive the Olympic Gold Order? I remember at the closing ceremony of Salt Lake that both Mitt and Fraser Bullock (2nd in command) were awarded the gold order. At least that's what I remember it being, they got a gold olympic ring necklace. How come they got this? Is it something all chief organizers get? How come Mitt got his at the closing ceremony?

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^yes

President Rogge presented Lord Sebastian Coe, Paul Deighton, Sir Keith Mills, and Lord Colin Moynihan with Olympic Orders, as well as honouring a number of other LOCOG staff for their achievements. President Rogge also presented the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, with the Olympic Cup, as a thank you to the people of London for their support for the Games.

...

IOC

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Just because you medal at an Olympics doesn't automatically make you a good sports administrator - which is what is needed to be IOC chief. In saying that, Bach clearly demonstrates he has the skills. I can't imagine who will challenge Bach next year.

No offense, but I did not say that it would, nor, as Baron said, a diplomat. That being said, taking part in the Games as an athlete gives you a unique experience and understanding of the Games. If you apply yourself, there is no reason you cannot parley that into something more. Coe, Rogge, Prince Albert, Jean Claude Kiley and others are all examples of that. I was really just marveling over that while we have had former athletes in the head slot, no medalists, as yet. Just think its interesting.

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I don't think you need to win a medal to be a member, just to have played a sport at an high level or to have participate seriously in the Olympics.

You aren't going to tell me that from the thousand of Athletes who participated in the summer or winter olympics for the last 40 years, you can't find 100 people who have the skills to be good sports administrator ?

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No offense, but I did not say that it would, nor, as Baron said, a diplomat. That being said, taking part in the Games as an athlete gives you a unique experience and understanding of the Games. If you apply yourself, there is no reason you cannot parley that into something more. Coe, Rogge, Prince Albert, Jean Claude Kiley and others are all examples of that. I was really just marveling over that while we have had former athletes in the head slot, no medalists, as yet. Just think its interesting.

It also gives you a substantial level of credibility amongst the athletes, something that matters if the Olympic Games are to evolve over the years and decades ahead. Quite evidently, Coe has demonstrated that he is persuasive: His team edged out Paris, even though London had only been classed a dismal fourth during an early IOC evaluation in Barbara Cassani's chairmanship. It was under his leadership that the inspiring message of a legacy for future generations was conceived and executed. Also, he has just managed to pull off an Olympic Games that has been universally acclaimed, something that was far from certain 7 years ago. Whilst he is not going to be the next IOC President, I certainly expect Coe to become the next IAAF President and wait in the wings as the President elected in 2013 makes his/her moves.

In an ideal world, he'd have a bigger claim to the IOC presidency than Thomas Bach (even though he is a compatriot, he doesn't exactly strike me as someone who either cares all that much about the athletes or would be a commercially successful administrator of the Olympic Movement). Why is Bach a frontrunner for the IOC chair again? If someone could (seriously) enlighten me, feel free to do so!

Coe's a comparably young guy, is able to bring across a "regular guy" persona and has the experience to be a skilful administrator.

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Lord Sebastian Coe wanted by British Olympic Association to take on chairmanship and revive its flagging fortunes

The chairmanship of the British Olympic Association is Lord Coe’s to refuse, with the architect of the successful London 2012 Games emerging as the clear consensus candidate to succeed Lord Moynihan in Charlotte Street.

Moynihan announced immediately after the Olympics that he was to step down after two combative terms as chairman, and Coe is the clear choice of sports governing bodies and government to replace him.

The change will come no later than November but Coe will take the leadership of the cash-strapped body only on his own terms.

He will not want to campaign for the post and will be reluctant to contest an election, though he would be confident of winning against potential internal candidates such as Richard Leman, president of Great Britain Hockey.

Coe would certainly take a less hands-on role than Moynihan, with the role just one of a portfolio of interests that will include a return to the corporate speaking circuit, and resuming his work as a Nike ambassador.

Crucially, the BOA role would also provide him with the opportunity to conduct low-key campaigning to become the next president of the International Association of Athletics Federations, a role he is hoping to take up when Lamine Diack steps down, no later than 2015.

...

more at

http://www.telegraph..._medium=twitter

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Coe to stand for BOA chair

Sebastian Coe has confirmed he will stand to be the next chairman of the British Olympic Association.

Lord Coe, the London 2012 chairman, said he had been approached to stand as the successor to Colin Moynihan by the BOA committee appointed to draw up a list of candidates.

Coe said: "I have been approached and I am happy for my name go to forward."

UKPA

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I alway liked the idea of Gianna A-D as IOC member and potential president.

While I don't doubt the ability of Coe to be a fantastic IOC President/Member, does anybody else find him cold? I know Samaranch and Rogge are not exactly vibrant people, but do we really need another melanchloly European male to lead the IOC? That organisation thrives off hegemony and I'd love to see it shaken up.

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While I don't doubt the ability of Coe to be a fantastic IOC President/Member, does anybody else find him cold? I know Samaranch and Rogge are not exactly vibrant people, but do we really need another melanchloly European male to lead the IOC? That organisation thrives off hegemony and I'd love to see it shaken up.

Funny you should say that about Coe. I thought the same. But since the Games finished, he's been pretty ubiquitous on TV, and he's a lot less catty. Actually, quite funny and down-to-earth. I think he was just stressed with that role, maybe tired. Now it's all over, he seems to be a different person. Give him a chance in his BOA role, then judge him after a year or two ;)

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I alway liked the idea of Gianna A-D as IOC member and potential president.

While I don't doubt the ability of Coe to be a fantastic IOC President/Member, does anybody else find him cold? I know Samaranch and Rogge are not exactly vibrant people, but do we really need another melanchloly European male to lead the IOC? That organisation thrives off hegemony and I'd love to see it shaken up.

A resounding YES to all of the above.

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Being BOA head will put him in a stronger position to take over the IAAF with his main rival already head of his nation's NOC.

And once head of the IAAF I would have thought he'd become an IOC member pretty quickly.

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