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A gallimaufry of 2018 Pyeongchang bits


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I took the idea of this thread out of the London boards (thanks Rob!). This article has lots of bits on the pending construction boom, the future of rail travel, and the targeting of Chinese tourists.

Olympic boom to spur construction

South Korea's hosting of the 2018 Olympics is triggering an $8.4 billion building boom that will expand the nation's high-speed rail network and create a winter- sports destination targeting millions of Chinese tourists.

Organizers will spend $3.7 billion on a train running from the central city of Wonju to host cities Pyeongchang and Gangneung in the east. Another $1.4 billion is earmarked for six athletics venues, accommodations and media facilities, according to International Olympic Committee documents.

Those plans may benefit the largest Korean construction companies, which are grappling with weak home sales and tightening credit. Hyundai Engineering & Construction Co., the largest builder; Samsung C&T Corp., the second-biggest; and Hyundai Rotem Co., the nation's biggest maker of train cars, all expressed interest in bidding for Olympic contracts.

"The domestic construction industry has been going through hard times in recent years because of the slump in the housing market," said Byun Sung Jin, an analyst at Mirae Asset Securities Co. in Seoul. "It will not only breathe some life into the region but also to the entire nation."

Revenue from the Olympics may help builders fund new projects after banks pared lending for real-estate developments by 26 percent in the three years through 2010 on concerns about bad loans, according to data from the Financial Supervisory Service, the financial regulator.

$60 Billion Benefit

The average price for new homes fell 8.9 percent last year, the biggest decline since 2002, Byun said. The economy is likely to expand 4.3 percent this year, down from an earlier estimate of 4.5 percent, the central bank said July 15.

Hyundai Engineering has gained 2.3 percent, compared with a 0.75 percent decline in the benchmark Kospi Index, since South Korea was awarded the games July 7. Samsung C&T has gained 9.7 percent and Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction Co. 5.3 percent in the same period.

The 2018 Olympics will generate 21.1 trillion ($19.8 billion) directly for Asia's fourth-largest economy, with another 43.8 trillion won in investment, tourism and branding coming in the decade after, said Park Tae Il, a senior research fellow at Hyundai Research Institute in Seoul.

Other cities have struggled with the aftermath of hosting the Olympics, prompting an IOC study. Vancouver, site of the 2010 winter games, reduced prices on condominiums in the former athletes' village by an average of 30 percent to spur flagging sales, the Canadian Press reported in February.

Avoiding White Elephants

Beijing, host of the 2008 summer games, built a shopping mall and underground tunnel near its Olympic stadium to help cover operating costs, the state-run China Daily newspaper reported last year.

"The government will have to be prudent in what projects they spend on so they don't gather dust after the games are over," Byun said. "We've seen that happen before and I'm pretty sure that is on the top of the list of things the government doesn't want to repeat."

South Korea was chosen over Munich and Annecy, France, in its third try for the winter games. The nation previously hosted the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.

Most athletic events — including skiing and bobsledding — will be in Pyeongchang, about 130 kilometers (80 miles) east of Seoul in the Taebaek mountains. Skating and hockey competitions will be held further northeast in Gangneung on the east coast.

High-Speed 'Catalyst'

More than $1.4 billion was spent preparing Pyeongchang for unsuccessful bids for the 2010 and 2014 winter games. Seven venues were built, and two of them — for curling and snowboarding — need upgrades for the 2018 Olympics.

The centerpiece of the forthcoming plan is a 113-kilometer train connecting Wonju with Pyeongchang and Gangneung. The existing railroad bypasses Pyeongchang, so travelers from Seoul must get off at Wonju and take a bus the rest of the way.

That journey takes about two hours. The new train, which can travel at speeds up to 250 kilometers per hour, will cut that to 68 minutes, according to the IOC's bid assessment.

Going to Gangneung will take another 12 minutes. Construction could start later this year, with completion scheduled for 2017.

"This rail line is absolutely necessary for the games," said Lim Jong Il, deputy director of the high-speed rail division at the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs. "The new Wonju-Gangneung railway can act as a catalyst to expedite the national rail-line projects."

Decade-Long Plan

South Korea has embarked on an 88 trillion-won plan this decade to extend passenger and cargo networks by 39 percent to 4,934 kilometers. About 16 trillion won is for high-speed trains, including the Olympic line and another linking Seoul with Mokpo to the south.

Existing service between Incheon Airport and Seoul will be upgraded so Olympic visitors can take one high-speed train all the way from the airport to the venues.

The government plans to move about 27 percent of the population by trains by 2020, compared with 16 percent now. The percentage of cargo moving by rail would increase to about 19 percent from the current 8 percent.

"Korea needs to build up its rail network because it will help to move not only people but cargo faster and more efficiently," said Heu Moon Wook, an analyst at KB Investment & Securities Co. in Seoul. "Construction companies will play a big role because they will not only have to lay down the tracks but they will have to build bridges and make tunnels to go through mountainous areas."

Targeting Chinese

Hyundai Engineering, Hyundai Rotem and Doosan Heavy, South Korea's biggest maker of power equipment, said in e-mails they believe the Olympics will generate business for them.

"With the recent decrease in public bidding projects, we are definitely interested in the related projects," said Sohn Soo Keun, a spokesman for Samsung C&T.

Organizers will spend $927 million on Olympic villages and broadcast centers, and $461 million on new venues — two hockey rinks, two skating rinks, an alpine ski run and a track for the bobsled and luge, according to the bid. The venues should be ready for testing by the end of 2016, said Jeong Hong Sub, a spokesman for the Olympic bid committee.

South Korea told the IOC it wants the games to leave behind a winter-sports destination for Asian tourists. The primary target should be the Chinese, James Rooney, chief executive officer of Market Force Co. in Seoul, said on Bloomberg Television.

About 8.8 million people visited South Korea last year, including almost 1.88 million from China, according to the Korea Tourism Organization. The number of Chinese visitors may reach 3 million by 2012, according to the Ministry of Culture, Sport and Tourism.

South Korea's tourism sector is "significantly underdeveloped" because the nation has concentrated on its "tangible goods" sectors, Rooney said. Because of the Olympics, the nation may attract as many as 50 million visitors by 2025, potentially generating $50 billion-$100 billion in annual spending, he said.

"The tourists that are going to be active in this part of the world are going to be Chinese tourists," Rooney said. "They like to spend money."

I'm especially excited about extending the high-speed rail networks to Pyeongchang. When I visited the area 4 years ago, I remember it being really REALLY tough to get around. I did the best I could by bus, but you really needed a car back then. Increasing accessability will be a huge boost to visitors.

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I've just underlined some of the main points (and one rebuttal) in the article:

KOC chief vows successful Games

KOC chief vows successful Games

He was relaxing for the first time in several months. Sitting in his office in Seoul on Monday morning, Park Yong-sung, the president of Korean Olympic Committee, said he was taking a short break from the sports world.

Until last week, Park had kept a grueling schedule, travelling around the world, participating in numerous international events, while promoting PyeongChang’s 2018 Olympics.

Park, who served six years at the IOC until 2007, has been involved in PyeongChang’s bid over the past decade.

His long battle for the Winter Olympics is now over as the Gangwon Province city, after two failures, finally won the right to host the 2018 Games, winning the majority of votes at the IOC session in Durban on July 6.

The KOC chief, however, noted that the real battle is yet to come.

“We have only six and a half years to prepare for the 2018 Games, and it’s a really tight schedule,” Park said.

Park said he was worried that there were already some people trying to tarnish and diminish PyeongChang’s Olympic campaign.

He was referring to the recent protest by some environmental groups. They are opposed to PyeongChang’s proposed alpine skiing venue in Jungbong, as the vast forested area is currently protected as a nature reserve.

“We’ve had numerous open discussions, tested all the possibilities before submitting our bid book to the IOC. I don’t understand why people are bringing up this subject again,” Park said, insisting that he would stick with the original game plan.

Park also ruled out the possibility of co-hosting the 2018 Games with North Korea, noting that PyeongChang would keep its promise to the International Olympic Committee.

“We’ve made promises to the IOC in our three-volume bid book, and we’ll work hard to keep the promises. That is most important for me,” he added.

PyeongChang needs to build six additional competition venues before 2018, including a new alpine skiing venue, ice hockey arena and also a sliding venue for bobsleigh, skeleton and luge.

Building new venues on schedule is important, but the most immediate task for PyeongChang is to nurture more winter sports athletes, said the KOC head.

He admitted that the popularity of winter sports here, in particular some skiing events such as biathlon, ski jump and cross country, is still considerably low.

To attract more fans, he said, finding more star athletes is crucial.

“You don’t go to a swimming pool just to see games. You go there to see stars such as Park Tae-hwan. We need to nurture more stars in winter sports,” he said.

The plan has already kicked off with the government and the KOC working together to develop a youth program, titled “Drive the Dream,” with more than 550 billion won ($518 million) of investment.

“We also need to train volunteers and game officials for the Games,” he added, noting that the KOC is planning to host more international winter sports events in preparation for the 2018 Olympics.

There are more than 200 Olympic committees around the world, but currently only 70-80 of them are participating in Winter Games, according to Park.

“We hope and believe more than 100 countries will be coming to PyeongChang in 2018. It will be the biggest Winter Olympics ever,” he said.

The head of the Korean sports governing body, who is also the chairman of Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction Co., sees the 2018 Winter Games as a chance to upgrade not only Gangwon Province but the entire country.

“Like we saw in 1988 after the Seoul Olympics, PyeongChang will bring a huge change to our country,” he said.

He noted the first task for PyeongChang is to establish the local Olympic organizing committee as soon as possible.

There are already some debate on who should lead the committee, and Park, who is arguably the most influential sports official here, is one of the strong candidates.

He was a member of the IOC from 2002-2007, and also headed the International Judo Federation in 1995, and recently, he was elected as a vice chairman of the Olympic Council of Asia.

He refused to say whether he would take the job if asked, but added: “The decision will be made by the government. I’ll follow the decision.”

Park is now 71 and knows his time with the KOC is entering the final stage, but it seems he will go out on a high.

“I think I’m very lucky to be involved in the Winter Games,” he said.

“Now, I just hope my health allows me to see the opening ceremony of the Winter Games here,” he smiled.

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PyeongChang 2018 issues first stamp to commemorate the Games

49003-olympic-image1.jpg49003-olympic-image2.jpg

The Korean postal service today released 1.5 million copies of special stamps depicting PyeongChang 2018 as host city for the winter Olympic Games.

The illustrations feature a downhill skier and the statuesque ski jumping venue that will be home to numerous sports events and also the opening and closing ceremonies.

The IOC will hold August 30-1 September the first orientation seminar with IOC Olympic Games Executive Director Gilbert Felli to start discussions on the formation of the OCOG and the initial stages to start the preparations for the Games.

SportsFeatures.com

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The second Korean-born player to play in the NHL is returning to the NHL at the age of 35. If he can hold on another 6.5 years, we could see him as captain of the Korean hockey team in 2018! Well, even if he were done by then, he could easily come out of retirement as long as he doesn't let himself go. How can the Korean team ever refuse a 700-game NHL veteran?

Hockey: Pittsburgh Penguins sign Richard Park

Proving you can always come home, the Pittsburgh Penguins have inked Richard Park to a one-year two-way deal. Park, 35, spent last season in Switzerland with Geneve Servette where he turned in a comparatively productive 34-point performance in 47 games. The veteran of 684 NHL games made his debut with the Penguins in 1995, when he became just the second South Korean born player to play in the league.

Park’s last tour of NHL duty was with the New York Islanders. He spent four seasons on Long Island, missing just 12 games during his time there. His deal is worth $550,000 at the NHL level. Park also spent time with the Anaheim Ducks, Philadelphia Flyers, Minnesota Wild, and Vancouver Canucks.

We would like to extend a big kamsahamnida to the Penguins for providing Park with another NHL opportunity, even if it’s only to lend some plausibility to our hopes of him captaining the South Korean hockey team at the 2018 Olympics in Pyeongchang. He’ll be like 41-years old, but he’ll still have a step on Jim Paek.

Here’s how The Pensblog remembers Park:

“Our only memories of him is killing penalties like his family was held hostage and killing the penalty meant saving them.”

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I doubt this is worth its own thread as, by the sound of it it will be resolved, but PC yet to sign Paralympic Host City contract because of it:

Future of Paralympic Games beyond 2016 in doubt due to marketing and broadcasting dispute

Exclusive: The future of the Paralympic Games beyond 2016 has been in doubt for months as negotiations between the International Olympic Committee and the International Paralympic Committee are in a stalemate over control of marketing of the event.

Tensions between the two camps have increased since IOC officials withdrew the 2018 Winter Paralympic Games contract for signing by host city Pyeongchang back in July, after the South Korean city successfully won the right to host the Winter Olympics at the IOC session in Durban.

'"We might not see a Paralympic Games in Pyeongchang in 2018,'" the South Korean IPC board member Hyang-Sook Jang said.

Usually the host city agreements for both the Olympics and Paralympics are signed with the winning bid committees immediately after the announcement of the winner, but this time only the Olympic Games contract was signed. Technically this means the Paralympic Games are only assured for London 2012, Sochi 2014 and Rio 2016.

In Durban, the IOC and the IPC had not reached a formal co-operation agreement with the sticking point surrounding complex negotiations about marketing, broadcasting and commercial aspects of the Paralympics. Negotiations have since dragged on.

This week there has been a series of meetings between high level IOC members and the IPC president Sir Philip Craven in Lausanne to find a compromise position.

The IOC contributes around £1.26m ($2 million) a year to help fund the Paralympics Movement and it is understood to have offered to increase the annual subsidy by 50 per cent.

In return the IOC wants a greater say in the staging of the Paralympics. The idea is for the IOC to effectively manage the Paralympic Games immediately after the Olympics and allow the IPC to focus on developing and nurturing the paralympian athlete pathways. Essentially the IPC would be contracting to the IOC their best para-athletes for the Paralympics.

IPC spoksman Craig Spencer said: "We have had two really positive meetings and we are confident we will get some sort of agreement settled soon. It will be sorted.'"

While the Paralympics has increasingly won the hearts of host nations, the movement struggles to pay its own way. The Paralympic component of the 2012 London Olympics is funded by more than £80 million directly from the taxpayer, but the real costs are much greater. The London operating budget is a combined Olympic and Paralympic budget of £2.15 billion.

An IOC spokesman confirmed that negotiations between the two parties have been taking place and that the ''talks have been constructive''.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/olympics/paralympic-sport/8768243/Future-of-Paralympic-Games-beyond-2016-in-doubt-due-to-marketing-and-broadcasting-dispute.html

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/\ Interesting. Yeah, 2018 is 30 years from when they signed their last major, agreement shortly after Seoul 1988.

I really don't see why they just don't fold in Paralympic events with the regular OGs. Just cut back the # of useless regular athletes from those minor nations who send 1- 2 athletes and DON'T buy any wide-screen TVs, eat McDonald's Happy Meals, use Visa at least 10x a year, or drink a lot of Coca-Cola.

I'm wondering if the contract/dispute with the IPC is tied up with the USOC-IOC dispute in how much the IOC wants to cut in the IPC on $$$ earned from US sources. Because they still haven't resolved USOC-IOC one, while this IPC-IOC is concurrently dragging on as well.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Ex-Gangwon governor to lead PyeongChang Games

Kim Jin-sun, former governor of Gangwon Province, is set to take the helm of the inaugural PyeongChang Winter Games Organizing Committee.

Minister of Culture, Sports and Tourism Choi Kwang-shik said Tuesday that Kim will lay the foundation stones for what would be the nation’s first Winter Olympics. Seoul played host to the 1988 Summer Games.

“Since PyeongChang began its bid to host the Winter Olympics in 2010, Kim has been with the town. Kim has been the most passionate supporter and has the most knowledge about (how to prepare for the) Winter Games,’’ Choi said. “As Kim has served as Gangwon Province governor three times, he is the right person to realize the PyeongChang citizens’ dream.”

The organizing committee will hold its inaugural assembly on Oct. 19, where Kim will officially be voted in as president.

Kim, who will also chair the executive committee for the Winter Games, will serve for two years.

Kim’s nomination is the first step for the country and PyeongChang after winning the right to host the 2018 Winter Games in Durban, South Africa on July 6. The eastern city was chosen following its third bid, beating out traditional winter sports powerhouses of Germany’s Munich and Annecy of France.

Moon Dong-hoo, former vice president of the Daegu IAAF World Championships, was named secretary general for the PyeongChang organizing committee.

Minister Choi said the organizing committee will be headquartered in PyeongChang. For effective communication with the central government and the IOC, an office will be set up in Seoul.

Cho Yang-ho, a former president of the PyeongChang Winter Games Bid Committee, had also been a strong candidate for the post along with Park Yong-sung, president of the Korea Olympic Committee. The three were considered vital to the successful bid, along with President Lee Myung-bak and Korean IOC member and Samsung Electronics Chairman Lee Kun-hee.

...

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/biz/2011/10/123_96061.html

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POCOG is born and Kim confirmed as President and CEO for the Games

The organizing committee for the PyeongChang Organizing Committee for the 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (POCOG) was formally launched today in Seoul at the Westin Chosun Hotel.

The inaugural meeting of the General Assembly was held today confirming Jin-Sun Kim, former Governor of the Gangwon Province and who served as Special Ambassador for the Olympic Bid, as POCOG President and Chief Executive Officer.

...

http://www.sportsfeatures.com/olympicsnews/story/49128/pyeongchang-2018-pocog-is-born-and-kim-confirmed-as-president-and-ceo-for-the-games

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This is exactly what I want to see happen in Korea.

Inspiring hockey in Korean girls

TAMPA: Following the choice of PyeongChang to host the 2018 winter Olympics, the Korea Ice Hockey Association (KIHA) has activated their Girls’ Open Hockey Camp looking to grow their female player base.

The objective behind the New Horizons bid for PyeongChang to host the Games was targeted to opening the door for winter sports growth in Asia and reaching out to a new generation of athletes in Korea.

Following the model of the International Ice Hockey Federation’s (IIHF) World Girls’ Hockey Day camp with more than 160 events in over 20 countries in October, the FIHA lost no time in setting up their own domestic plan.

They have eight camps planned this month after the first took place on November 3rd in Seoul at the Mok-dong Ice Rink which will host the 2012 IIHF Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship Division II Group B from March 10-16 2012. About 53 participants participated in the camp between the ages of 5 and 38 with the average age being teenagers.

The girls and ladies were first given skating lessons and then technique by top Korean officials, Youngoh Kim, the head coach of the women’s national team, Nosu Kim, the assistant coach, former female player and KIHA director Yunyoung Lee. They were joined by three current women’s national team players, plus Jonghwan Lee, the assistant coach of U16 national team and Gihee Kang, the goaltending coach of the Jr. Dragons Club.

Kwangeun Stine Choi of the KIHA said, “All participants were very happy and really enjoyed the camp. They have never lost their smile on their face during the camp. Parents had also expressed their satisfaction to the new program and lessons.

“With support and material from the IIHF and advice from the IIHF’s Asian office, the Korea Ice Hockey Association has organized this camp well and made a successful first step for a bright future of youth hockey players, especially girls.

“Thanks to 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics Koreans express more interest in ice hockey than ever,” she said.

“Therefore, the Korea Ice Hockey Association will make more programs and courses to encourage more children to play our fascinating sport.”

More camps will be planned for 2012 to keep the momentum going.

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Looks like winter season is here for Korea:

Snowfall underway

LAURA WALDEN / Sports Features Communications

TAMPA: The host city for the 2018 winter Games got their first big snowstorm of the season just as the 2011-2012 winter ski season gets off the ground.

The Alpine ski resort of Yongpyong has over 40 centimeters (15.7 inches) of snowfall with more expected through the weekend. The temperature is at -2.1 centigrade.

9 million foreign visitors this year

On December 1st the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism (MCST), Korea Tourism Organization (KTO) and Visit Korea Year Committee will be holding a special event at Seoul’s Incheon airport to celebrate the 9 millionth foreign visitor this year.

Incheon airport will be the main landing point for the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic winter Games.

Various cultural performances will be staged at the airport and foreign nationals coming into the country will receive souvenirs and brochures and the 9 millionth visitor will be interviewed and get special gifts.

They will also be met by the Minister of Culture, Sports and Tourism as well as the President of KTO to mark the day.

49214-olympic-image1.jpg

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Looks nothing like the pics Nature/Tulsa used to post!

:P

FAKE, there won't be snow in 2018... South Korea hasn't lot of snowfall during winter, the winter it's a dry season in Korea... Excepted the last winter but it was exceptional (The first time in 1 century)

Without snow WoG in 2018 will be a fail... ;)

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Many Koreans Visit Ski Resorts Over Weekend to Enjoy Winter Sports

The weather was cold in many regions this weekend, dropping below zero degrees Celsius, and the major ski resorts across Korea welcomed a large crowd of winter sports lovers.

About 100-thousand skiers and snowboarders visited Gangwon Province this weekend, where up to 50 centimeters of snow accumulated since last Thursday.

Ski resorts in other regions including Gyeonggi and North Jeolla Provinces also welcomed a large number of skiers and snowboarders over the weekend.

Meanwhile, the weather in Korea has returned to its annual average.

Arirang News

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Well so the Pyeongchang win has helped on the winter development in Korea. Well, good for them. Just hope the hockey team improves alot prior tge olympucs otherwise they will loose all their games and by a huge margin.

Great to see there's snow in Korea by the way...

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This week end in French Alps :

la-neige-est-tombee-en-abondance-et-le-paysage-ce-jeudi-sous-un-magnifique-soleil-donnait-des-envi.jpg

In South Korea (only artificial snow) :

vivaldi%20(5).JPG

If you would like to come in French Alps to Noel

Meteo in French Alps

More than 1,2 meter of snow reported for the next 8 days

I'm curious to know how Korea will do in 2018 if the temperatures are positive, it's impossible to made snow in this condition...

This week end, it's a woman ski Worldcup in Courchevel... SkiWorldcup Courchevel France, and which kind of sport event in Korea? Nothing

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Deep ocean water to cool ice rink for Pyeongchang Olympics

The ice rink to be used during the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics will be heated and cooled using deep ocean water, becoming the first winter sports facility to be powered by green energy.

The ice rink will use water sourced from at least two meters under the surface of the ocean, a depth where no sunlight can penetrate so it remains at a consistently low temperature of less than 2 degrees Celsius.

The Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs said on Monday that it plans to build the Olympic speed skating rink as a low-carbon-emission facility in Gangeung, Gangwon Province in northeastern Korea. This is part of the government's plan to turn the global sporting event into a showcase for Korea's environmentally-friendly technology and energy-saving efforts.

The water will be sourced from 200 m below the surface of the ocean around 5 km to 8 km off the coast of Gangeung. Pipes measuring 50 cm in diameter made of high-intensity polyethylene, or a similarly durable material, will be used to pump in the water in order to prevent corrosion.

The water drawn from the ocean will help save costs as it makes it easier to keep the ice rink frozen. An official at the Land Ministry said, "The cooling system of the ice rink will help keep its temperature at 15 degrees below zero and freeze the ice through a network of coils situated underneath." ....

2011121301078_0.jpg

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Deep ocean water to cool ice rink for Pyeongchang Olympics

The ice rink to be used during the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics will be heated and cooled using deep ocean water, becoming the first winter sports facility to be powered by green energy.

The ice rink will use water sourced from at least two meters under the surface of the ocean, a depth where no sunlight can penetrate so it remains at a consistently low temperature of less than 2 degrees Celsius.

The Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs said on Monday that it plans to build the Olympic speed skating rink as a low-carbon-emission facility in Gangeung, Gangwon Province in northeastern Korea. This is part of the government's plan to turn the global sporting event into a showcase for Korea's environmentally-friendly technology and energy-saving efforts.

The water will be sourced from 200 m below the surface of the ocean around 5 km to 8 km off the coast of Gangeung. Pipes measuring 50 cm in diameter made of high-intensity polyethylene, or a similarly durable material, will be used to pump in the water in order to prevent corrosion.

The water drawn from the ocean will help save costs as it makes it easier to keep the ice rink frozen. An official at the Land Ministry said, "The cooling system of the ice rink will help keep its temperature at 15 degrees below zero and freeze the ice through a network of coils situated underneath." ....

2011121301078_0.jpg

Good concept !!!

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