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What if Durban came back at the last minute...


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2024:

125px-Flag_of_France.svg.pngvs. 125px-Flag_of_South_Africa.svg.png

But unless Tokyo surprisingly gets 2020, will the centennial dream from Paris be able to beat continental rotation AND a bid from the final new frontier? The answer... in 6 years' time :P

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No 2020, 2024 "definite".

National bidding guidelines and bidding fund to be established quite soon, Ideally pre 2012.

Okay Mo, two questions:

* Will it be Durban to bid?

* Is the 2022 Commies bid still on?

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No 2020, 2024 "definite".

National bidding guidelines and bidding fund to be established quite soon, Ideally pre 2012.

I think this decision is in SA's best interests.

If you think the pickings are slim for 2020, they're going to be even slimmer for 2024. Nobody is going to wade into that race.

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If you think the pickings are slim for 2020, they're going to be even slimmer for 2024. Nobody is going to wade into that race.

Perhaps there will be another bid from Africa. Morocco seems like a possibility. Less sure about Egypt or Kenya (or Nigeria). Would S Africa definitely succeed over these other countries?

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Perhaps there will be another bid from Africa. Morocco seems like a possibility. Less sure about Egypt or Kenya (or Nigeria). Would S Africa definitely succeed over these other countries?

Oh, very definitely.

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South Africa is the only feasible option on the continent at this point in time. And Morocco, if the IOC wanted to go that route, they'd just go with Istanbul. More stable & much more exotic.

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South Africa is the only feasible option on the continent at this point in time. And Morocco, if the IOC wanted to go that route, they'd just go with Istanbul. More stable & much more exotic.

Yes.

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I think this decision is in SA's best interests.

If you think the pickings are slim for 2020, they're going to be even slimmer for 2024. Nobody is going to wade into that race.

This might be why Rogge was foaming at the mouth trying to get RSA in the 2020 race, to avoid a slim 2024 field with RSA making an early announcement about their intentions.

Is it better for Durban to go with a CWG bid for 2022, and still go for 2024? My personal thoughts are that it's kind of close together, and think it would seem more reasonable to spread the two out like Rio did, but what are your thoughts? Seoul used their hosting the Asian Games in 1986 as a test for their readiness in 1988 though...

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It is somewhat analagous to Brazil 2014 and Rio 2016, but in a less intense way, of course.

Ironic, isn't it, that "the whole of Africa" is clamoring for RSA to bid/host these games when up until, the mid 90s, was it, they were the outcast of the entire continent. Is all forgiven and forgotten about the Apartheid era? I think if I were a person of color, I might feel conflicted about traveling there. (I know millions do each day, but still...)

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Is it better for Durban to go with a CWG bid for 2022, and still go for 2024? My personal thoughts are that it's kind of close together, and think it would seem more reasonable to spread the two out like Rio did, but what are your thoughts? Seoul used their hosting the Asian Games in 1986 as a test for their readiness in 1988 though...

As I've said before, with regard to winning the bid, I don't think it really matters what SA does. As long as the plan is basically functional it will win.

If SA knows they are targeting 2024 and they work that into their plans for the CWG in 2022, I can actually see the pairing working exceptionally well. Two major events. The PERFECT test run for the Olympics. Minimal upkeep and maintenance. Guaranteed multiple uses for new construction. If anything, 2022 would probably inspire great confidence regarding the Olympics.

I'd say they should go for it.

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As I've said before, with regard to winning the bid, I don't think it really matters what SA does. As long as the plan is basically functional it will win.

If SA knows they are targeting 2024 and they work that into their plans for the CWG in 2022, I can actually see the pairing working exceptionally well. Two major events. The PERFECT test run for the Olympics. Minimal upkeep and maintenance. Guaranteed multiple uses for new construction. If anything, 2022 would probably inspire great confidence regarding the Olympics.

I'd say they should go for it.

The past few months aside, when there seem to have been divisions between government and SASCOC, South Africa's sports and events strategy is almost a case study in how to do things right.

Since the ending of apartheid they began with the very successful Rugby World Cup, then they went for the World Cup, only losing narrowly to Germany and went on to get the next one and made it another great success.

Now they're weighing their options up for a different kind of event completely, namely multi-sport events. And rather going for the big one straight off the bat, they're looking at a CWG as a launching pad. The only possibly oddity is that their CWG City may be a different one to their Olympic City, though Manchester did a world of good for London's chances, so I don't see why that should be any different for South Africa.

I think slow and steady may well win the race for SA. They're biding their time and, it seems, making sure they're not rushing in eyes closed. All credit to them.

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Inaugural Sports and Events Tourism Exchange surpasses expectations

29 July 2011 SETE proves to be a major success

corners_213x118_white_on_white.gif Cape Town International Convention Centre

© Cape Town International Convention Centre quote_marks_grey.gif It gave the sports and tourism industry an opportunity to come together, to realise that there is a confident, purpose-driven generation in South Africa with the skills, infrastructure and the knowledge to attract a wide-range of sports events to South Africa in the future. South African Tourism Global Manager of Events, Sugen Pillay. " THE INAUGURAL SPORTS AND EVENTS TOURISM EXCHANGE (SETE) has exceeded expectations and entrenched South Africa’s status as one of the world’s preferred big event destinations.

The Exchange took place at Cape Town’s International Convention Centre this week from July 27-29 2011. Building on the collaboration between the sports, events and tourism industry that resulted in South Africa successfully staging thebiggest event in the world last year, the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the exhibition and conference gave a unique platform for South Africa to set itself apart as a world leader in sports tourism.

“It gave the sports and tourism industry an opportunity to come together, to realise that there is a confident, purpose-driven generation in South Africa with the skills, infrastructure and the knowledge to attract a wide-range of sports events to South Africa in the future,” said South African Tourism Global Manager of Events, Sugen Pillay.

This focus on sports events is in line with South African Tourism’s strategy to position South Africa not only as a leader in wildlife, adventure and leisure tourism, but also as a leading global sports and events destination.

Sports and Tourism to form an events steering committee

The conference, that attracted international and local leaders in the sporting and tourism industry, provided an opportunity to learn from the successes of other major event destinations, such as Barcelona’s Olympic Games, and to move forward with a clear sense of purpose in attracting and hosting events in the future.

With the support of the delegates from both the public and the private sector, asteering committee was formed to drive South Africa’s sports events strategy, to explore the establishment of an events fund and to explore the criteria for the management of this fund.

“The mandate to identify and stage events that are aligned to the strategic objectives of the country belongs to both sports and tourism. By establishing a steering committee our efforts will be far more effective and give all stakeholders the support they deserve to grow sports tourism in South Africa,” said Pillay.

Chief Director of the Department of Sport and Recreation South Africa, Professor Paul Singh, said it was imperative South Africa had a proactive plan to host major international sporting events over the next 15 to 20 years.

“The investment made by the South African Government for the 2010 FIFA World Cup needs to be sustained for the next twenty years. And our key driver will be consistently hosting major events,” said Singh.

But he also noted the significance of smaller-scale sports events: “Given that they (smaller-scale sport events) require little or no additional infrastructureinvestment, they might be considered as offering a greater net benefit to local communities.”

Delegates and speakers at the conference highlighted the need to not only attract newevents to the country but to also grow the international stature of existingevents, such as the already successful Comrades Marathon and the Cape ArgusCycle Tour, to develop new events and to investigate other opportunities which make use of our sporting facilities and bring tourists to the country for youth sport and international friendly matches.

International speaker and Bid Director of the successful Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games bid, Derek Casey, was impressed with the SETE initiative.

“I think it is an important conference and I wish other countries would do this as well. I think it is important for South Africa to take stock. You have important decisions to make about what events to go for and that is all part of what the strategy is for the next 10 to 15 years. I think it is important that there is greater coordination, so that you know exactly what you want to go for and why,” said Casey.

Also speaking at SETE 2010 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee CEO, Dr Danny Jordaan, agreed with the need for events-specific criteria prior to bidding for any events. “Criteria must be coordinated. What you had in the past was national federations of the different sporting codes bidding to host an event and the discussion (on hosting the event) happening after the decision.”

Jordaan emphasised the need to act quickly to attract events to the country to fully leverage off South Africa’s infrastructure and experience in hosting big events. “We cannot wait another 30 years to host a major event. By that time we would have to build new facilities in order to comply with the requirements of the sports confederations. Right now that gap is probably the smallest. If we wait, that gap will widen and the people that worked on the World Cup will all have retired and you will have to start training people with no events experience all over again.”

Exhibition linked serious sellers and serious buyers

Sports tour operators, sporting codes across the board, sports and tourism facilities and provincial and city tourism agencies were among the over 100 exhibitorsthat participated in the inaugural Sports and Events Tourism exchange exhibition. It gave international buyers an excellent sense of what South Africa has to offer in terms of sports tourism and gave the local industry an unprecedented platform to engage and create further competitive advantage for the future.

“The SETE exceeded our expectations. We have brought together the private and public sector and have attracted the right kind of international buyers. We organised more than 800 meetings at the exhibition which resulted in some serious contactsbeing made and some serious promises of events being brought to South Africa,” said Carol Weaving, managing director of the exhibition organisers, Thebe Exhibitions and Projects Group.

From the SportAccord International Convention, to the Taekwondo World Championships and a Powerboating World Series, a wide variety of sports events were being mooted for South Africa in the future.

The host city of SETE (Cape Town), has itself announced its intention to bid for the World Games 2017, which will use existing facilities across the metropolitan to host this event, which incorporates sports not contested in the Olympic Games.

The Sports and Events Tourism Exchange will be back in 2012 with a larger international presence expected. It will be hosted in September, with the location still to be decided.

To consolidate South Africa’s efforts in attracting business tourism and major events to the country, a National Conventions Bureau is to be set up by the end of the year at South African Tourism, with the SETE now established as a great platform to expand South Africa’s sports and lifestyle event offering.

Ends

Issued by South African Tourism.

For further information contact

Jermaine Craig at SOUTH AFRICAN Tourism

Tel: +27 11 895 3000

Email:Jermaine@southafrica.net

Allison MacDonald at Ireland Davenport Public Relations

Tel:+27 82 771 2541

Email: allison.macdonald@ireland-davenport.co.za

Register on our media extranet to browse the latest news releases (from SOUTH AFRICAN Tourism as well as the tourism industry in general), access the news archive and get details of all upcoming tourism industry events (both locally and internationally).

South African Tourism is the national tourism agency responsible for the marketing of South Africa as a preferred tourist destination. It is headed up by Chief Executive Officer, Ms Thandiwe January-McLean, Chief Operating Officer Mr Timothy Scholtz and Chief Marketing Officer, Ms Roshene Singh.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The saga continues - though hopefully we'll have the definitive answer soon.

SA's 2020 Olympic dream still alive

Aug 16, 2011: SPORTS and Recreation Minister Fikile Mbalula is pursuing the 2020 Olympic bid and will formally ask cabinet to review the matter this week.

The influential Mbalula has been quietly lobbying colleagues in cabinet, saying hosting the Olympic Games will be cheaper than the Fifa World Cup.

Mbalula could not be reached for comment but his spokesperson, Paena Galane, confirmed he will make a presentation to cabinet this week.

The sports minister fell ill and collapsed at the last cabinet meeting in May where the government took a decision not to bid. At that stage, the cabinet argued the money should rather be used to improve service delivery for South African communities.

"We'll be resubmitting to cabinet to see if we can change the decision of cabinet on hosting the 2020 Olympics. South Africa stands a good chance of hosting the event," said Galane. "The support that we received during the 123rd session of the International Olympic Committee in Durban last month was tremendous."

In June, Mbalula said they decided to pursue the dream of hosting the Olympics after receiving huge support from various global stakeholders after the successful 2010 World Cup.

"I was not there when cabinet took the decision not to bid but I hope that I will be able to come up with a new agreement with them this time round," Mbalula said at the time. "The Olympics are cheaper to host as compared with the Fifa World Cup because the IOC (International Olympic Committee) is making a serious financial contribution. You must remember cabinet's decision is binding despite the fact that I was not there but we are hopeful that my colleagues will agree with me that we must bid."

Some of the influential sports leaders who have openly supported a bid by South Africa include IOC president Jacques Rogge.

South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee boss Tubby Reddy said: "We are aware there is an intention by minister Mbalula to approach cabinet on this matter. September 1 is the cut-off date to inform the IOC that as a country, city (Durban) and Olympic movement, we express our desire to bid."

Sowetan

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The past few months aside, when there seem to have been divisions between government and SASCOC, South Africa's sports and events strategy is almost a case study in how to do things right.

Since the ending of apartheid they began with the very successful Rugby World Cup, then they went for the World Cup, only losing narrowly to Germany and went on to get the next one and made it another great success.

Now they're weighing their options up for a different kind of event completely, namely multi-sport events. And rather going for the big one straight off the bat, they're looking at a CWG as a launching pad. The only possibly oddity is that their CWG City may be a different one to their Olympic City, though Manchester did a world of good for London's chances, so I don't see why that should be any different for South Africa.

I think slow and steady may well win the race for SA. They're biding their time and, it seems, making sure they're not rushing in eyes closed. All credit to them.

Agree 100%.

I still think SA will win whenever they next bid -- be it 2020 (as Rols recent post suggests it might still be) or 2024.

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