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The sad thing here is that in many ways Madrid is correct: "The games can and should be organized under a 'smart' concept of optimizing resources... The important thing to tell the world is that the Olympics can be held in a dignified manner without throwing money away.'' I agree completely with Blanco. Unfortunately, I am fairly certain that the IOC does not.

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Here is the organisation behind what I read a few days ago:

the translation:

Workers in the sports advertised also a demonstration to the evening of 20 March at 18.30 and rallies around the hotels where you will be staying IOC members on Tuesday,

http://noqueremosmadrid2020.blogspot.com/

While it could be written off as just a "bread not circuses" type organisation, as I said, its not a good look on the tails of a near perfect encounter with Tokyo.

Edited by runningrings

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Madrid is fooling themselves if they think that this is what the IOC truly wants, &/or thinks this is what they should want. They shouldn't be painting a picture to the IOC on how to really run "proper Games", unless they really want to lose. As long as the IOC has other options that can give them what they really would want, then that's who they're gonna go with.

They talk too much about how their Games concept is already invested in & how compact it would be. But that aspect alone is not going to win them the Games. Just like an article that came out right after the Tokyo evaluation, there needs to be a "why" a city should get the Games. And "helping a struggling economy with a cost-effective, ready plan" is not why enough.

And really, all Madrid really wants these Games for anyway is so that they can finally "outdo" Barcelona. It's like they don't feel accomplished enough until they can finally say that they hosted the Olympics, too, & can be just as, if not moreso, successful than Barcelona was. The big brother/little brother complex is all that we have here really. Not compelling whatsoever.

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@ FYI. Agree 110% with you on everything. Madrid's campaign just smacks of arrogance and irresponsibility. Today they presented their "fiscally responsible" Games plan. This is an oxymoron, as the Olympics themselves are not generally a "fiscally" responsible endeavour. If Madrid had fiscal responsibility truly on its mind, it would never have bid for 2020, it would have seen the bigger picture (that an Olympics back to Spain so soon is obviously an extremely difficult idea to persuade the IOC to go for) that to become truly appealing:

1) more time needs to pass since Barcelona.

2) there needs to be solid, substantiated evidence of economic improvement, and growth, for the risk to decrease.

Both these things will happen, and I actually have no doubt that one day Madrid Olympic dream will come true, it just wont be in 2020. My honest instinct tells me, that with the other candidates lurking, a Madrid Olympics could quite realistically be at least another 30 to 50 years away.

Edited by runningrings
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The sad thing here is that in many ways Madrid is correct: "The games can and should be organized under a 'smart' concept of optimizing resources... The important thing to tell the world is that the Olympics can be held in a dignified manner without throwing money away.'' I agree completely with Blanco. Unfortunately, I am fairly certain that the IOC does not.

Thing is, you can have a big Games which is held in a dignified manner without throwing money away as well as a small austere Games that does the same. The Games just gone in London was a big Games, but every venue that wasn't needed afterwards was temporary or used some temporary seating, and the regeneration aspect is what the city needed anyway so it dovetailed well with the bid even if it was expensive.

I think Madrid is tarring all big Games with the same brush and being too prescriptive, just because it happens to fit their current circumstance. If London had converted Wembley to a T&F stadium using a platform, dotted venues around the city and used more existing spaces, we could've spent less, but it wouldn't have had the same impact on the city. It wouldn't have been "smarter" to do it that way even if it would've been cheaper.

Madrid should be promoting their bid as fiscally responsible because it is, but that shouldn't be their only message, and they shouldn't be saying to the IOC "this is the way things should be done" as it's not always, and such an attitude is unlikely to go down well.

Madrid's venue plan is really very nice, better than Istnabul's from what I've seen so far, and I don't just mean that in terms of its compactness. A clever strategy for the final presentation might be to do a presentation like London's or Sochi's - with all their venues presented in flashy CGI flyovers AS IF they've not yet been built. Ask the IOC how excited they'd be if the bid was offering to build all this from scratch for them. Then slowly reveal each venue one by one and say "well, this is our gift to you, we already have done because we believe in sport and the Olympic ideals". Because, to be frank, if a city was offering to build what Madrid already has from scratch it'd be considered alongside some of the "bigger" bids (maybe not Sochi/Beijing level but certainly London/Sydney). This kind of creative twist might be better than presenting themselves as a dry fiscally responsible option which tries to preach to the IOC about what they should be doing.

Edited by RobH
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Today they presented their "fiscally responsible" Games plan. This is an oxymoron, as the Olympics themselves are not generally a "fiscally" responsible endeavour.

Agreed. Pulled the words right out of my mouth. Rome was smart enough to pull the plug on their Olympic bid, & their chances for 2020, I would say, were much better than Madrid's. Not to mention that the Italians were/are in a bit better financial shape than the Spainards are, albeit, not by much, though.

Madrid here, falls in the same "everything ready" category like Salzburg, Annecy & Munich were in. And we all know how all those turned out. If this is their only selling point (which is virtually obvious) then their in for a rude awakening, especially when now it seems like they also want to dictate to the IOC as well.

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Madrid's venue plan is really very nice, better than Istnabul's from what I've seen so far, and I don't just mean that in terms of its compactness. A clever strategy for the final presentation might be to do a presentation like London's or Sochi's - with all their venues presented in flashy CGI flyovers AS IF they've not yet been built. Ask the IOC how excited they'd be if the bid was offering to build all this from scratch for them. Then slowly reveal each venue one by one and say "well, this is our gift to you, we already have done because we believe in sport and the Olympic ideals". Because, to be frank, if a city was offering to build what Madrid already has from scratch it'd be considered alongside some of the "bigger" bids (maybe not Sochi/Beijing level but certainly London/Sydney). This kind of creative twist might be better than presenting themselves as a dry fiscally responsible option which tries to preach to the IOC about what they should be doing.

You should contact Madrid 2020, bcuz they really need someone like you on-board. Even if it was for only a split second, I bought all this. And perhaps that's all one may need since it doesn't take longer than that to push a ballot button. "Ooops! I didn't mean to push for Madrid, but their (pretend to be new venue) renderings were so awesome!"

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Thing is, you can have a big Games which is held in a dignified manner without throwing money away as well as a small austere Games that does the same. The Games just gone in London was a big Games, but every venue that wasn't needed afterwards was temporary or used some temporary seating, and the regeneration aspect is what the city needed anyway so it dovetailed well with the bid even if it was expensive.

I think Madrid is tarring all big Games with the same brush and being too prescriptive, just because it happens to fit their current circumstance. If London had converted Wembley to a T&F stadium using a platform, dotted venues around the city and used more existing spaces, we could've spent less, but it wouldn't have had the same impact on the city. It wouldn't have been "smarter" to do it that way even if it would've been cheaper.

Madrid should be promoting their bid as fiscally responsible because it is, but that shouldn't be their only message, and they shouldn't be saying to the IOC "this is the way things should be done" as it's not always, and such an attitude is unlikely to go down well.

Madrid's venue plan is really very nice, better than Istnabul's from what I've seen so far, and I don't just mean that in terms of its compactness. A clever strategy for the final presentation might be to do a presentation like London's or Sochi's - with all their venues presented in flashy CGI flyovers AS IF they've not yet been built. Ask the IOC how excited they'd be if the bid was offering to build all this from scratch for them. Then slowly reveal each venue one by one and say "well, this is our gift to you, we already have done because we believe in sport and the Olympic ideals". Because, to be frank, if a city was offering to build what Madrid already has from scratch it'd be considered alongside some of the "bigger" bids (maybe not Sochi/Beijing level but certainly London/Sydney). This kind of creative twist might be better than presenting themselves as a dry fiscally responsible option which tries to preach to the IOC about what they should be doing.

I agree that London's Games were fiscally more responsible than Beijing's and the regeneration was really the core justification for those Games. London made a huge investment and managed it well.

Unfortunately, many cities simply do not have the same situation to work with. Many cannot raze a portion of the city and effectively start over. That was a unique scenario and I am glad London found a way to make it work.

I don't get the sense Madrid is shaming the "mega Games". I think they're pointing out a real problem. The Olympic Games are becoming so expensive that increasingly it's only "countries with something to prove" that are going to be willing to pay the huge price tag. Sochi would seem to be further confirmation of this trend.

The IOC can vote for whoever they want, but I do believe that a more modest, sustainable model is in the long-term best interests of the Olympic Movement.

Truthfully, there is a part of me that wonders if it makes sense for the US to bid for any Games at all. As long as there are other countries out there willing to pump 50 billion+ into their Games, why not just let them? That figure defies logic when there are so many more worthy ways to spend that amount. Frankly, its obscene. The US shouldn't (and won't) get on board with that type of prodigality. Eventually the IOC will exhaust the ultra-expensive host options and they will have to return to reason and reality. Until such time, a strong part of me is tempted to think that the US shouldn't bid for anything. The only thing that's stops me from fully committing to that is the fact that I love the Games -- the competition, the international camaraderie. Those things can be enjoyed and valued for far less money, however.

For that reason, I think Blanco's point is totally valid. I don't believe it's Madeid's time and I don't expect them to win, but I agree that a more measured approach to the Games ought to be adopted.

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Regardless of Blanco's words, I totally agree with runningrings, though. It's an oxymoron for Madrid to be even bidding. Rome was smart enough to pull out bcuz they realized their dire financial situation.

Yes, the Games should be held with a cheaper, more responsible price tag, but even Madrid would struggle with that at this point, since you still need Billions for an operating budget. The IOC perhaps needs to be more responsible, but in this race, even Madrid is not the answer to that. They should practice what they preach as well, & the IOC will most likely see right through it.

When you're struggling to make ends meet, you don't go out & finance yourself a brand-new BMW. You stick with your old, still reliable car until things get better financially when you can go out & splurge on those new wheels, not before. Like the saying around here goes, Madrid is putting the cart before the horse.

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When you're struggling to make ends meet, you don't go out & finance yourself a brand-new BMW. You stick with your old, still reliable car until things get better financially when you can go out & splurge on those new wheels, not before. Like the saying around here goes, Madrid is putting the cart before the horse.

Ah, but you forget that BMW is an Olympic sponsor...and Old Reliable isn't. So, of course, you hock your first born for a chance to host the Olympics!! ;)

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Only for London 2012 I think. Rio 2016 is using Nissans. :ph34r:

Erm, anyway....

As far as that analogy goes it's fine. There is a moral case that Spain shouldn't be looking at anything like this right now (although I'd personally feel happier about this argument if it were Spaniards making it).

But in real terms, does this analogy hold up? If Madrid can prove it can get together the sponorship needed (the big question for me), indicate ticket and merchandise sales will be fine (Spain loves its sport, I don't see why they wouldn't be), then that's more or less sorted. The rest of the cash comes from broadcasting revenue and, as we know, there's very little to spend on venues.

Arguing by analogy is tricky. It could easily be argued that Spain has already built a big house which is losing money and renting out some rooms for a while makes a lot of sense.

Madrid was shortlisted so the IOC deems is capable, Spain is behind the bid so the Spanish probably think in terms of my analogy more than yours. If Madrid was the only bidder, I don't think the IOC would reopen bidding. The trouble for Madrid - assuming they can prove to the IOC they can get the private sponsorship - is that they're in a competition. Back to the original point: a Nissan is a nice little run-around and will get you where you want very efficiently. But if someone offered you a top of the range BMW with all the optional extras instead, you'd take that wouldn't you?

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BMW was the Official Automobile for the 1996 Centennial Games in Atlanta. And I think one other Games besides London. Beijing and/or Athens?

Madrid's recent marketing tack could've worked if the Spanish economy were at least stable...no large deficits; and not racing into great inflation either. Unfortunately, with Rome's departure, Tokyo recovering from the Fukushima disaster, and Turkey's economy humming along, it certainly makes Madrid's 3rd run quixotic...regardless of whether most of the venues are there. Also, the shadow of Barcelona 1992 (and with the FINA world champs there in Barcelona this summer) reinforces that glorious summer of 1992. Tokyo's last run for glory was nearly 50 years ago; and Turkey hasn't tasted Olympic glory yet. So, unfortunately, Madrid's timing is really bad. Well, the Spaniards have at least the World Cup victory and a Spanish-speaking Pope, to console them, come September 8.

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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Interesting analogy, Rob. The question is whether the amount of investment required to make those rooms appealing for renters would be more than offset by the rent ultimately paid by the renters. That's a stickier question. If the answer isn't a resounding "yes," why risk sinking more resources into your money pit? Why not focus energies on projects that are more likely to get a bigger return on their investment than Olympic Games?

As a locale, Madrid is enormously appealing to me personally, but it is still soon for Spain. 1992 plus the financial questions should still be enough to handicap Madrid in comparison to its challengers.

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It just seems like there's too many financial questions with Madrid. If its still so obtainable, even with their dire financial problems, then why did Rome pull out for 2020 then. They had many of the venues already built as well, were in a better financial situation, granted not by much, but still. The italians also love their sports. And their chances were likely much better.

And what does it matter if its the Spaniards themselves demonstrating concern or not. Didn't stop Italy from pulling the plug even though there were many Italians in great disappointment over the governments decision. And if that link that runningrings posted is any indications, there are Spainards in disapproval. And besides, since when does that stop others from voicing their concerns on other bids like China's, Brazil's or when South Africa is talked about, how the South Africans should focus instead on their social inequalities over spending on an Olympics that they don't really need. Shouldn't the South Africans be the ones to judge that.

This incessant attempt of Madrid of trying to go after the Olympics, even with their current financial black cloud & the geopolitics not really in their favor, just makes me all the more skeptical over the real reasons why they really want the Olympics. Especially after the Italians withdrawal. It seems that Madrid just wants the Olympics as a "coming out" party like Beijing/Sochi, so they can finally outdo the Catalans, versus that the Olympics would really be good for the people of Spain.

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The other thing about the 'will benefit Spain's economy' argument, will the Spanish have recovered enough by 2019-2020 to make 2020 a sell-out, w/o depending on foreign ticket buyers? Will they have enough disposable income to buy tickets for the CUltural Olympiad, the regular Games and the Paras? Or will ticket revenues depend on the undependable foreign allocations to spell the difference between dismal failure and success??

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Ehm .. no one posted .. detailed information about the IOC Evaluation Commission visit to Madrid this week

The IOC Evaluation Commission visit: the next landmark in the Olympic race
15 03 2013 [22:27] ~ Madrid 2020
illuminate280.jpg
The Madrid 2020 Bid is preparing for one of the most important landmarks in the race to host the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games: next week’s visit of the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) Evaluation Commission, whose members will be arriving in the Spanish capital over the weekend. Ahead lie a hectic four days in which the heads of the Madrid 2020 Bid will spend every morning detailing the various aspects of their project to the IOC’s experts and then the first part of every afternoon visiting most of the competition venues and surrounding areas. The Mayor of Madrid, Ana Botella, and the President of the Spanish Olympic Committee (COE), Alejandro Blanco, will welcome the members of the IOC Evaluation Commission at a reception on Sunday evening.
The Spanish Prime Minister, Mariano Rajoy, will announce the start of the visit at 8.50am on Monday 18 March, and His Royal Highness Prince Felipe, Prince of Asturias, will bring it to a close at 12 noon on Thursday 21 March. In between will come a series of morning presentations on each of the 14 themes detailed in the Candidature File, as well as visits to the Bid venues and daily press conferences given by the Bid’s executives and reflecting on each day’s events. At 4.30pm on Thursday the members of the IOC Evaluation Commission will give their one and only press conference, at which they will provide an overall assessment of the visit.
Monday 18 March
Accompanied by the Mayor of Madrid, Ana Botella, and CEO President Alejandro Blanco, the Spanish Prime Minister, Mariano Rajoy, will declare the visit under way at 8.50am. The first presentation, which will focus on the vision, legacy and concept of the Games, will get under way at 9am and will be coordinated by COE vice-president and Madrid 2020 Managing Director Victor Sanchez. Over the course of the next hour Botella and Blanco will set out each and every aspect of these three areas, with the assistance of the entrepreneur Andres Burdett and the show jumper [J1] Natalia Holding.
A second presentation will begin at 10am. Entitled “Sports and Venues”, it will be coordinated by the Bid’s General-Director of Sport, former Olympic athlete Raul Chapado and will feature contributions by Chapado himself; Victor Sanchez; the former Olympians and current IOC members Marisol Casado and Pachi Perurena; and Ignacio Cobos, Operations Director at Bovis Lend Lease.
At 11.30am the spotlight will shift to the Olympic Village presentation. Joining Victor Sanchez will be Theresa Zabell, another former Olympian and now the Bid’s International Relations CEO; the architect Javier Herreros; and Juan Manuel Fernandez and Gabriela Rosello.
The Paralympic Games provide the subject for the day’s final presentation, with Raul Chapado coordinating contributions by Victor Sanchez; Spanish Paralympic Committee (CPE) President Miguel Carballeda; CPE Secretary General Miguel Sagarra; and the Paralympic swimmer and multi-medal winner Teresa Perales.
At 7pm executives from the Bid will provide an update on the day’s events at a press conference.
Tuesday 19 March
Finance, Marketing, Public and Political Support and Legal Affairs are the four presentations on the agenda for Tuesday.
Finance leads the way at 9am, with Madrid 2020 CFO Manuel Parga directing operations. Speaking along with Parga at the presentation will be Victor Sanchez; IOC Executive Board member Juan Antonio Samaranch Jr; and Pierre Patrick Buffet, an analyst with PwC.
Marketing, the day’s second presentation, begins at 10am, with Victor Sanchez, Antonio Garrigues, and Antonio Diaz Almagro of Accenture all taking to the floor.
Next up at 11.30am is Public and Political Support, featuring contributions by the Spanish Minister for Education, Culture and Sport, Jose Ignacio Wert; the President of the Autonomous Region of Madrid, Ignacio Gonzalez; Ana Botella, Alejandro Blanco and Victor Sanchez.
The day’s fourth and final presentation, Legal Affairs, begins at 12.30pm. Speaking at the presentation will be the Spanish Minister of Foreign Affairs, Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo; Ana Botella; the Education and Employment Minister for the Autonomous Region of Madrid, Lucia Figar; Felix Plaza from the legal firm Garrigues; and Victor Sanchez.
Executives from the Madrid 2020 Bid will bring the day to a close with a press conference at 7pm.
Wednesday 20 March
Taking part in the 9am presentation “Accommodation” will be the General Manager of the Madrid 2020 Foundation, Ignacio Fernandez; the Autonomous Region of Madrid’s Director General of Tourism, Joaquin Castillo; the President of the Madrid Hoteliers’ Association, Jesus Gatell; and the Head of Accommodation for London 2012 Organising Committee, Donna Taylor.At 10am Saioa Sancho, Project and Venues Manager at Bovis Lend Lease; and Carlos Cristobal, the Director of the Madrid Transport Consortium, will step up to give their presentation on transport.
“Media Operations”, the final presentation of the day, begins at 11.30am, with Madrid 2020 Communications Director Ignacio Gomez-Acebo being joined by Jim Curley and Lorena Segura.
The day’s press conference will take place at 5.30pm.
Thursday 21 March
The final day’s two presentations are “Security and Medical Services” and “The Environment”, the former beginning at 9am and featuring Esther Sanchez-Calvo, a security expert with Bovis Lend Lease; Belen Prado; and the Spanish Secretary of State for Security, Francisco Sanchez Vazquez.
The presentation on the environment will begin an hour later and will comprise contributions by Graciela Rosello, an environmental expert with Bovis Lend Lease, and Javier Rubio de Urquia of Madrid City Council.
Proceedings will then be brought to a close at 12 noon by the Prince of Asturias.
At 4.30pm the members of the IOC Evaluation Commission will hold its only press conference of the visit, which will be followed by a closing press conference given by representatives from the Bid.
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"El País" (http://ccaa.elpais.com/ccaa/2013/03/16/madrid/1363470717_073126.html) also shows when they plan to visit the venues.

Monday 18. Santiago Bernabéu stadium (football), Las Ventas bullring (basketball), Palacio de Deportes (volleyball) and Retiro Park (beach volleyball).

Tuesday 19. Olympic Park and Campo de las Naciones.

Wednesday 20. Club de Campo and River Manzanares area.

And it definitely looks like "Illuminate the future" is the bid slogan.

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Madrid 2020: ‘We’ll fight for it to be our turn this time’ says Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy

18 03 2013 [11:11] ~ Madrid 2020


APERTURA-DE-LA-EVALUACION-DEL-COI009.jpg


Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has said Madrid is prepared to ‘fight’ for the opportunity to host the 2020 Olympic Games.


The Spanish leader was speaking as he welcomed the International Olympics Committee (IOC)’s Evaluation Commission to the capital.


He cited the city’s experience in ‘hosting big sporting events’, ‘the good weather’ and ‘excellent transport’.


Mr Rajoy also pointed out that nearly 80 percent of the venues needed for the Games are ready and that the country is already a top tourist destination with 58 million visitors per year.


His remarks came after an appearance on Sunday by His Royal Highness Prince Felipe to give his backing to the bid.


The Prince joined Madrid Mayor Ana Botella and Alejandro Blanco, the President of the Spanish Olympics Committee and Madrid 2020, at the start of three days of IOC inspections.


Led by Sir Craig Reedie, the Commission will visit key sites such as the iconic Bernabeu Stadium, Las Ventas Bullring and Retiro Park between 18 and 21 March.


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Yes, that's not good. I hope it's just been a punctual problem and that it can be solved for the following days.

Some pictures from today's visits to the venues:

Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, with footballer Iker Casillas.

2013_3_18_ljaMsc7S4vebO2xkGB00U2.jpg?wid

Las Ventas bullring.

577937_10151358210619220_182650913_n.jpg

Retiro Park. The pond is right at the feet of the lion statues at the back. Here they were joined by Spanish beach volleyball player Elsa Baquerizo.

401375_10151358432794220_1769445690_n.jp

All photos are published on the bid's official facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151358210469220.1073741830.145790969219&type=3

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Okay, so Madrid will "fight" to host the 2020 Olympic Games (but so will the Japanese & Turks). Still missing a compelling "why", though.

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Okay, so Madrid will "fight" to host the 2020 Olympic Games (but so will the Japanese & Turks). Still missing a compelling "why", though.

Because it's "Spanish" time!! Ole!! Am warming up to Madrid bid now. I hope it's between Madrid and Istanbul.

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Madrid must give a different impression and try to show something new to the IOC, I mean, if it's the 3rd time they're visting Madrid they must innovate to create a surprise factor... Good luck Madrid!

Because it's "Spanish" time!! Ole!! Am warming up to Madrid bid now. I hope it's between Madrid and Istanbul.

Finally I see you supporting Madrid :D I hope it is gonna be between those cities too!

Las Ventas is a perfect example of the suprise factor I was talking about (Y)

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