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Early tactical error of PC


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OK, still in post-analysis mode.

I think if Korea had gone for Gangneung, sited the Ceremonies there, therefore it becoming the true anchor city, I think Korea might've succeeded earlier the 2nd time. It was all a matter of branding.

#1 - PyeongChang is a real funny thing to say for the non-Korean tongue. I mean Nagano, Sapporo, Harbin, Tokyo and Aomori are so much easier to say that "PyeongChang" whose complete name, BTW, is actually PyeongChanggun. What a sonnaf gun!!

#2 - It is so close to PyongYang, one of the capitals of the Evil Empire.

Whereas, if say, the bid had gone "Gangneung 2010" (the 2nd time around), I think it could've licked Vancouver then.

It sailed in this time because PyeongChang was already embedded in the IOC consciousness after 10 years of trying. But it might've been much easier had it gone with Gangneung or even Alpensia.

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OK, still in post-analysis mode.

I think if Korea had gone for Gangneung, sited the Ceremonies there, therefore it becoming the true anchor city, I think Korea might've succeeded earlier the 2nd time. It was all a matter of branding.

#1 - PyeongChang is a real funny thing to say for the non-Korean tongue. I mean Nagano, Sapporo, Harbin, Tokyo and Aomori are so much easier to say that "PyeongChang" whose complete name, BTW, is actually PyeongChanggun. What a sonnaf gun!!

#2 - It is so close to PyongYang, one of the capitals of the Evil Empire.

Whereas, if say, the bid had gone "Gangneung 2010" (the 2nd time around), I think it could've licked Vancouver then.

It sailed in this time because PyeongChang was already embedded in the IOC consciousness after 10 years of trying. But it might've been much easier had it gone with Gangneung or even Alpensia.

Oh please no, anything but Alpensia. That's one of the things I agree with Tulsa about, I wouldn't have minded another name for Alpensia.

Anyway, I've also been in post-analysis mode too.

First, to address your points, Pyeongchang might have had to get over the Pyeongchang-Pyongyang confusion factor, but with enough name recognition, it eventually became a non-factor. The bid was correctly called "Pyeongchang" though, not "Pyeongchang-gun." Because the "gun" suffix means county.

And Gangneung is the city of the ice events along the coastal cluster. Since neither Pyeongchang nor Gangneung (nor anywhere outside Seoul) is really known to the outside world, I think Gangneung might have had a harder sell in portraying itself as a winter destination because instead of ski mountains, you have the coast where people play in the summer. It would be as if neither of Vancouver and Whistler were known to the world, and wasn't in Canada. You have Whistler up in the mountains to ski, and you have Vancouver with its climate so mild that you can walk outside with a short-sleeved shirt some Februarys. Vancouver's saving grace here was that it was internationally known and that it was backed up by Canada's winter reputation.

Apart from everything that's already been talked about, I believe more than ever that Pyeongchang would not have gotten 2018 if Yuna had never been born. Thinking back to 2009, slagging on PC was probably one of Gamesbids' most favourite forms of recreation. If that was at all indicative of how the IOC felt at the time too, I sensed a shifting of perceptions after the 2010 Games. I thought maybe Korea had such a successful Games that it could be seen by the outside as being a serious winter nation. No offense to Korea's long-track speed skaters (who also lucked out in getting gold thanks to Sven Kramer's coach's gaffe), but if Yuna had not won gold in Vancouver, then I don't think 2010 would have been any more successful than 2006 was. From a psychological standpoint, Yuna's figure skating gold probably meant more to Korea than all their other medals put together in 2010, and everyone else picked up on that.

And from there, it seemed like the momentum seemed to shift back to Pyeongchang, as they continued to play up Yuna as the perfect example of the youth of Asia's rise in winter sports. Without her gold and her face as the representation of the 2018 bid, I don't know if PC ever would've gained the momentum they did back in 2010, and maybe they'd become a footnote in Olympic bidding history much like Detroit.

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I think you read to much into Yuna Kim's gold medal and its significance for the Pyeongchang bid. It was clear already before her gold medal that Pyeongchang would be those to beat -- OK, maybe not so much around the time of the disastrous Biathlon World Championships, but a few months later they were the clear favourites again.

And Yuna's success in my opinion only confirmed that Korea is a nation of skaters. And I also don't know whether she became so terribly famous and significant in the rest of the world. In the end, Korea still has to prove that it can win medals also in other events than ice skating.

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LOL... all of a sudden some premium member keeps giving me negative rep points all at once. Whatever makes him happy.

If you recall back in '09, PC's popularity here was at an all-time low that some even suggested they wouldn't even make the shortlist if there were more bidders. The Biathlon WC only gave Munich lovers (let's not kid ourselves, the board was full of them) the ammo to slam PC at every given opportunity, and I can only imagine a similar perception was shared within the IOC at that time. If the vote was taken 1.5 years ago, PC would not have won. The 2010 Games brought Korea some credibility again in that they could actually be taken seriously as a winter nation. And not just a nation of short trackers. Maybe I give Yuna more credit than she deserves, but her gold was the best thing that could have happened to the PC bid at that time to get some momentum going in their favour. It also later made her that much more powerful when addressing the IOC. The vote was a landslide yesterday but without her, it would be far from it.

Oh, and Korea doesn't have to prove anything.

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#2 - It is so close to PyongYang, one of the capitals of the Evil Empire.

Come on, nobody is going to confuse the two, they're like chalk and cheese. It'd be like confusing the leader of the free world with the world's most wanted man, and nobody would be dumb enough to do that would they?

Fox-News-Fail-Obama-Dead.gif

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OK, still in post-analysis mode.

I think if Korea had gone for Gangneung, sited the Ceremonies there, therefore it becoming the true anchor city, I think Korea might've succeeded earlier the 2nd time. It was all a matter of branding.

#1 - PyeongChang is a real funny thing to say for the non-Korean tongue. I mean Nagano, Sapporo, Harbin, Tokyo and Aomori are so much easier to say that "PyeongChang" whose complete name, BTW, is actually PyeongChanggun. What a sonnaf gun!!

#2 - It is so close to PyongYang, one of the capitals of the Evil Empire.

Whereas, if say, the bid had gone "Gangneung 2010" (the 2nd time around), I think it could've licked Vancouver then.

It sailed in this time because PyeongChang was already embedded in the IOC consciousness after 10 years of trying. But it might've been much easier had it gone with Gangneung or even Alpensia.

No way Pyeonchang beat Vancouver in 2010. No chance at all.

Points to consider:

2008 was in Beijing unlikely for 2010 to be in Asia as well

2012 was dead set on being a European Games, if Pyeonchang had won, it would have guaranteed victory to either Toronto/New York

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No way Pyeonchang beat Vancouver in 2010. No chance at all.

Points to consider:

2008 was in Beijing unlikely for 2010 to be in Asia as well

2012 was dead set on being a European Games, if Pyeonchang had won, it would have guaranteed victory to either Toronto/New York

No chance? The difference was 3 votes! All it would have taken was 2 voters flipping or accidentally hitting the wrong button for PC to have won in 2010. I don't equate that with "no chance"

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Oops, I've gotten confused in my timeline. What I originally meant to say was, for 2014, if the bid say, had become GANGNEUNG 2014, maybe...just maybe...it could've held its own against Putin's and Plushenko's 2014 juggernaut? That's what I meant.

After the first-round recognition and close call in 2010; maybe a slight rebranding for 2014 might've done it then??

So reslotted into the 2014 timeframe, whaddya think now??

P.S. Also, I think Yuna was just icing on the cake. Yeah, she may'be been a fitting spokesperson but...really...hinging such a major bid on such a young 1x Olympic gold medallist might've been a little too much (vs. say the 2x gold medallist in the other camp. Of course, what else could Korea do?) But for me -- and I'm just talking final presentation now which NAILED the whole journey the other day, Toby Dawson's moment packed quite a punch there for me. It was an angle neither of the two other teams had or tried. But I digress...

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No chance? The difference was 3 votes! All it would have taken was 2 voters flipping or accidentally hitting the wrong button for PC to have won in 2010. I don't equate that with "no chance"

Yeah, really. Have some people forgotten how close PyeongChang was for 2010. Well, apparently so.

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Hmm, maybe the Yuna factor does sound farfetched. But what got me thinking of this in the first place was that the PC bid really was in the dumps not even 2 years ago. And one of the differences between 2014 and 2018 was PC's use of domestic athletes in its bid and presentation. I dunno, the use of guys like Tomba, who has no connection and probably didn't even care about PC other than how much they could pay him as a hired gun... I cringe when I think back to PC leading to the 2014 vote.

But maybe Rols was right in that it was more a case of "Not another bid!" and that that feeling subsided later. But whatever the reason, what a huge turnaround.

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I don't think Gangneung is much easier to pronounce...

But as for the beach resort factor, it's not as if Sochi didn't face this obstacle, and it had much less international name recognition than Vancouver.

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Aside from the pronounceability factor, it's odd that this winning bid went w/ the smaller city name whereas, it's always the BIGGER town -- in the 2-cluster bids that carries the name. Salt Lake over Park City; Torino over whatever the little ones are; Vancouver over Whistler. It's NOT going to be Vail or Aspen or Steam Creek(?); it's going to be Denver.

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The thing with that was, that PyeongChang proposed to have the ceremonies there at the ski-jump. And the Olympic Charter states that the ceremonies MUST be held in the "host" city. So therefore, Gangneung could not be used as the main name.

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The thing with that was, that PyeongChang proposed to have the ceremonies there at the ski-jump. And the Olympic Charter states that the ceremonies MUST be held in the "host" city. So therefore, Gangneung could not be used as the main name.

Right. So they built their whole bid around the ski jump-OC scheme even though GanYeung (there...much easier to say) is the more major population area. Kinda odd...even though I know it's some Ceremonies puppetmaster behind this thing who will have streams of downhillers carrying lanterns down the ski jump slides for the O.C.

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Regarding Yuna, regardless of to what degree she helped, a number of news sources have come out with such analysis over the past 2 days:

Yuna's contribution crucial to victory

In a performance almost as dominating as the one that earned her the Olympic gold medal 16 months ago, South Korea's Kim Yu Na put on a show for the ages this week at the International Olympic Committee's meeting in South Africa.

The 20-year-old skate queen was the point person for the successful Pyeongchang bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. The South Korean city beat out Munich and Annecy, France, for the right to stage the spectacle after losing in two previous attempts.

The Korean Olympic Committee's decision to make Kim the face of its bid was pure genius. Young, hip and beautiful, she represents the future generation of the emerging economic power.

Kim magnetism was on full display in the days leading up to the vote as she promoted the bid's "New Horizons" theme.

"Since she arrived in Durban last Thursday, Kim's every move has been closely followed by over 100 reporters," South Korea's Chosun Ilbo reported. "When her name was called to give the final presentation at the IOC's General Assembly six days later, members of the audience cheered and whistled, while scores of IOC officials rushed to have their photographs taken with the young star."

The dynamic and stylish Kim was a powerful and gravitational force, who carried out her assigned task with precision.

We have all heard of the person that "lights up a room when they walk into it." That is Kim Yu Na — intelligent, charming and fearless.

When I think of a role model for my 8-year-old daughter, I think of Kim. Somebody who has great values, but is tough and determined.

Her final presentation to the IOC members was fantastic and done in nearly perfect English. It was a message that clearly resonated.

"Ten years ago, when Pyeongchang began its dream to host the Winter Games, I was a young girl beginning my own Olympic dream in an ice rink in Seoul," she said. "I'm an example of a living legacy of our government's effort to improve the standard of Korean winter sports."

As nice as it to see the Winter Games returning to Asia 20 years after they were in Nagano, it was even more enjoyable to see somebody like Kim, who was clearly raised the right way and is proud of her country, triumph.

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For me, Theresa Rah carried the presentation for PC. Yuna, yeah, because she is the current Ladies Singles World & Olympic champion ...and the IOC was, of course, courteous to her.

But what if she WASN'T Olympic champion? Who would the bid have relied on? Would they still have bid? If Munich didn't put up Katrina, would OC have? Or vice-versa: if PC hadn't put Yuna in, would Katrina have played such a prominent role of Munich?

I think Yuna's just happening to be O champ. was a coincidence in timing. But w/o her, even if only with Theresa and Toby, PC would still have won, IMHO.

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Yeah, I think if the race had been closer like we all thought it would be, we could point to Yuna or whoever else as making the difference. But in such a landslide (I have never in my lifetime seen a bidding vote so convincing), maybe the IOC just thought it was Korea's turn, regardless of what happened in the final days.

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Miki Ando is the current World Champion of Ladies FS.

But regardless, Yuna is the biggest celebrity in Korea from any industry. However I don't know how big of an impact she has on the rest of the World and outside of figure skating.

Still, she did a good job and deserved a pat on the back.

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Well, we may never know just how much she helped, but it looks like helping land the Games has made Yuna even MORE popular in her homeland, if that was ever possible:

Kim Yu-Na most valuable to Pyeongchang's Olympic winning bid: survey

SEOUL, July 11 (Yonhap) -- South Koreans felt that reigning Olympic figure skating champion Kim Yu-na made the biggest contribution to PyeongChang's winning Winter Games bid, a survey showed Monday.

According to Gallup Korea's poll of 506 people, 46.5 percent picked Kim as the person who played the most important role in helping PyeongChang win the right to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. The surveyed could select up to two people.

Kim was one of the presenters for PyeongChang, which beat out Munich of Germany and Annecy of France in an International Olympic Committee (IOC) vote last week in Durban, South Africa. Kim served as an honorary ambassador for the bid efforts and also appeared in a video clip during the presentation that introduced PyeongChang's venue plan.

Next on the most valuable list was Lee Kun-hee, chairman of Samsung Electronics and one of two South Korean IOC members, at 19.5 percent. President Lee Myung-bak, who gave an English-language presentation on the day of the vote, was third at 18.6 percent.

I think Moon Dae-Sung (Korea's younger IOC member) deserves an honourable mention too. I had never before seen him speak before the presentation, but he oozed charm from the way he carried himself. As a 34 year old (young by IOC standards), I think he was instrumental behind the scenes in securing the votes of many of the other younger IOC members, like the athletes themselves, in showing the fun side of Korea, something Lee Kun-Hee could never do.

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