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105 members have voted

  1. 1. Should Blatter resign?

    • No
      16
    • Yes
      89
  2. 2. Should the elections for 2018 and 2022 be repeated?

    • No
      22
    • Yes (both)
      39
    • Yes (only 2018)
      0
    • Yes (only 2022)
      41
    • No, but the country, which bidded but lost, should host the next ones
      3
  3. 3. Should the bribery scandal be investigated by public authorities?

    • No - the FIFA ethic council will handle that perfectly
      7
    • Yes - the FIFA isn't able to handle it "in the family"
      98


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so the english press like to speculate a lot but as baron asked, when will we see the "smoking gun" documents? where are all the documents proving their accusations? Do they have it? Come on... This

Or Tony, you could *not* go on. That would be better, wouldn't it?

Shut the hell up. Honestly. Just shut up and leave.

Hmm, nations from Africa doing what countries on every other continent is doing - backing a corrupt *Eurpoean* organization... is proof that *Africans* are stupid and the most backward on earth. Hmmm, it can't just be that... gotta be something else baron doesn't like about Africa.

In terms of football governance Africa is backwards. Jim Boyce was called a racist for pointing this out and hounded out of FIFA by the moral beacon that is Jack Warner. But Mr Hayatou hardly has a great record himself (his finest moment being when he chucked Togo out of the ACN for not fulfilling a match after they were involved in a bus shooting). It's not surprising he backs Blatter and has his federation doing the same.

FIFA is an organisation which the big European nations would love to see reformed but England's, Spain's, Germany's vote is equal to every little Pacific Island or African nation gobbling up Blatter's handouts. Just because FIFA is based the regulation-lite juristiction of Switzerland doesn't mean they have the approval of most European nations.

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In terms of football governance Africa is backwards. Jim Boyce was called a racist for pointing this out and hounded out of FIFA by the moral beacon that is Jack Warner. But Mr Hayatou hardly has a great record himself (his finest moment being when he chucked Togo out of the ACN for not fulfilling a match after they were involved in a bus shooting). It's not surprising he backs Blatter and has his federation doing the same.

FIFA is an organisation which the big European nations would love to see reformed but England's, Spain's, Germany's vote is equal to every little Pacific Island or African nation gobbling up Blatter's handouts. Just because FIFA is based the regulation-lite juristiction of Switzerland doesn't mean they have the approval of most European nations.

I see nothing wrong with pointing out how backwards and corrupt Africans football governance is. Suggesting it is a uniquely African problem on the other hand....

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  • 1 month later...

FIFA officials arrested over money laundering and wire fraud.

The authorities made the arrests on Wednesday after arriving unannounced at the Baur au Lac hotel in Zurich ahead of the governing body’s 65th Congress on Saturday (EST). It is reported that the allegations relate to corruption in relation to the bids for World Cups as well as broadcast and marketing deals. President Sepp Blatter - who is set to win a fifth term in office - was not one of the individuals charged, police confirmed, but members of FIFA’s executive committee have been targeted.

The exact number of arrests isn’t known, but the New York Times reports that prosecutors will unseal an indictment against more than 10 officials in what is shaping up as the first step in exposing corruption allegations that have plagued FIFA for years. The Associated Press quoted Swiss police as saying six arrests have been made. The officials include Eduadio Li of Costa Rica, Jeffrey Webb of the Cayman Islands, a vice president of the executive committee; Eugenio Figueredo of Uruguay, another executive committee vice president and former the president of the South America association; and former FIFA Vice President Jack Warner of Trinidad and Tobago. The New York Times reported that “he arrests were carried out peacefully, with at least two men being ushered out of the hotel without handcuffs”. It is a huge blow to FIFA’s reputation ahead of the presidential elections.

http://www.foxsports.com.au/football/fifa-arrests-top-officials-arrested-on-charges-of-wire-fraud-racketeering-and-money-laundering/story-e6frf423-1227371402996

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  • 3 months later...
Fifa secretary Jerome Valcke suspended

Fifa secretary general Jerome Valcke has been put on leave and released from his duties until further notice.

A Fifa statement said it had "been made aware of a series of allegations involving the secretary general".

Newspaper allegations on Thursday implicated Valcke, 54, in a scheme to sell World Cup tickets for above face value.

The Frenchman, who is said to deny the allegations, has been in his role at Fifa since 2007.

Fifa has been engulfed by claims of widespread corruption since May, when Swiss police raided a hotel in Zurich and arrested seven of its top executives.

President Sepp Blatter announced that he would stand down just days after winning an election in June.

Valcke, who last month was considering standing to be the new president, now faces a formal investigation by the Fifa ethics committee.

Valcke has faced scrutiny in recent months over his role in an alleged $10m (£6.5m) bribe.

United States prosecutors say the money was paid by South Africa to former Fifa vice-president Jack Warner in return for his vote and backing during their successful bid to host the 2010 World Cup.

The money is said to have been transferred to Warner from a Fifa bank account after being reappropriated from South Africa's World Cup local organising committee budget.

The New York Times and other US media outlets, citing US law enforcement sources, have claimed Valcke was the "high-ranking Fifa official" who signed off the payment - an allegation Valcke denied.

BBC

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/football/34286208

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Fifa needs change, but this democracy-crushing choice is grim

Sheikh Salman bin Ebrahim al-Khalifa says he has been urged to stand for Fifa’s presidency by a number of Fifa members. Shame on every one of them

In any sane world, the spectacle of a man from one of Earth’s most oppressive regimes pontificating about a presidential election would be regarded as so obviously absurd as to be self-satirising. And yet, as hardly needs explaining, Fifa is not a sane world. Never mind Kansas, Toto – I don’t think we’re even in Oz anymore. Is there a world beyond even the world that’s through the looking glass, a place where the Red Queen and Humpty Dumpty actually seem quite rational compared to some monstrous arsehole from the Bahraini royal family presenting himself as a change candidate?

The monstrous arsehole in question is Sheikh Salman bin Ebrahim al-Khalifa, whose ascent to football primacy has been a classic riches-to-riches story. Wondering what he might have achieved had he not been held back by his connections is one for another day. He can only play it as it lays, and Sheikh Salman currently declares himself under increasingly heavy pressure to stand as a candidate in Fifa’s presidential election.

According to his good self, he is being urged to stand “by a growing number of senior football administrators, Fifa members and personalities of public life”. And shame on all of them – but we’ll come to that shortly.

One suspects Sheikh Salman will find it difficult not to bow to these overwhelming pressures – though it must be said his family do possess backbone. Their resistance to the idea of greater political freedom within their own country has been particularly determined, with Bahrain’s Arab Spring crushed in ways inventive even by the standards of some of their ghastliest neighbours. Mass incarceration, torture, denial of medical care … Up the reds! As for Salman himself, he is personally suspected by various human rights groups of identifying pro-democracy athletes – including footballers – who were then imprisoned and tortured. He denies this.

That a royal from such a country should be the momentum candidate in the world governing body’s election is a disgrace heaped upon a disgrace, and showcases Fifa’s endless capacity to find hidden basements to the barrel it is always scraping.

It was long remarkable that stewardship of a sport – which is to say, a meritocracy – had been ceded to a kleptocracy. But now that balloon has gone up, what would be even more remarkable would be to replace that kleptocracy with a president selected from an autocracy. It must be said that Sheikh Salman is not the only candidate from an authoritarian state on offer in the Fifa election: Prince Ali of Jordan is also available for consideration. But should Sheikh Salman declare his candidacy, his established power player status as president of the Asian Football Confederation would likely guarantee him far more support.

Indeed, he would only be contemplating a run had he received strong private assurances of backing from Europe, and believed he had a good chance of the same from Africa. If he has received those assurances, as is thought, then whoever gave them has simply indefensible ideas about what sort of people should be empowered outside of the countries on which their families have a stranglehold. Having had a little think about it, as a European, I would literally prefer Michel Platini over Sheikh Salman. It’s a hilariously grim choice, but on balance I care more about democracy and human rights than even alleged bribery.

Forgive the repetition of a point, but it ought to be a basic standard that princely candidates from brutal non-democracies need not apply. And I don’t mean to be fussy, but can Fifa at least rule out emissaries from countries that TORTURE FOOTBALLERS?

More @ http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2015/oct/21/sheikh-salman-bahrain-fifa-presidency?CMP=share_btn_tw

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FIFA is an eldery dog with a terminal illness which must be put to sleep and end its misery, if I can be honest. The corruption is so spread everywhere it will matter little what new president they put once Blatter is gone. I mean, Havelange (the previous president) was also corrupt as hell, only that he wasn't this cheeky.

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Can someone explain the latest stories about Germany not bribing FIFA to host the cup.. our FIFA news can be a bit garbled here.

Apparently Julia Louis-Dreyfus' cousin gave a $7 million dollar bribe to FIFA, that nobody knows what it was for or where it went. But some people are saying it was to bring the games to Germany, even though the payment was made two years after Germany was given the games.

Makes no sense to me.

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So, in the confusion about the money flows around the German WC 2006 bid, which now also has some tax evasion flavour and personal mud slinging as ingredients (lawyers will earn a lot from that), DFB President Niersbach, who not long ago was rumoured to succeed Platini at UEFA if Michel inherited Sepp's post, has resigned himself.

It's really like the series finale of a Dallas type soap in which all major characters will be wiped away, one way or another.

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So, in the confusion about the money flows around the German WC 2006 bid, which now also has some tax evasion flavour and personal mud slinging as ingredients (lawyers will earn a lot from that), DFB President Niersbach, who not long ago was rumoured to succeed Platini at UEFA if Michel inherited Sepp's post, has resigned himself.

It's really like the series finale of a Dallas type soap in which all major characters will be wiped away, one way or another.

Not that Hamburg had much of a chance winning against LA and Paris, but do you think this scandal can directly affect the Hamburg bid?

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Not that Hamburg had much of a chance winning against LA and Paris, but do you think this scandal can directly affect the Hamburg bid?

Hm, DFB figures aren't really linked to the bid, so I don't think this will have too much of a negative effect. It might even have a positive one, because maybe the Euro 2024 bid will now be off the agenda - and that would be the ultimate Olympics bid killer anyway.

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It is interesting to try and decide exactly what constitutes bribery. Does Germany agreeing to an exhibition match against small countries count as bribery? Does England hosting foreign officials at a banquet constitute bribery? What about a meeting with the head of state? A trade agreement? I am not sure where the line should be drawn.

Perhaps some form of blind voting by third parties is the answer. A number of anonymous fans, players and clubs could be given votes.

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FIFA Corruption Case Brings Another Wave of Pre-Dawn Arrests

ZURICH — Swiss authorities began a new series of pre-dawn arrests Thursday in the broad investigation, led by United States officials, into corruption in international soccer. More than a dozen people were expected to be charged, law enforcement officials said, nearly doubling the size of an already huge case that has upended FIFA, soccer’s multibillion-dollar governing body.

Some of the arrests took place at the same luxury hotel where other FIFA officials were arrested in May. Swiss police entered the hotel, the Baur au Lac, through a side door at 6 a.m. local time. A hotel manager told visitors in the lobby they had to leave the property because of “an extreme situation.”

The police were targeting current and former senior soccer officials on charges that include racketeering, money laundering and fraud, authorities said. The new charges were expected to hit South and Central American soccer leaders particularly hard, the officials said.

Alfredo Hawit of Honduras and Juan Ángel Napout of Paraguay were among those arrested, multiple people familiar with the investigation said. Hawit is the president of Concacaf, the regional confederation that includes North and Central America and the Caribbean. Napout is the president of Conmebol, the South American confederation. Both are FIFA vice presidents and members of the powerful executive committee.
...
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FIFA Executive Committee unanimously approves extensive reforms
(FIFA.com)

03 Dec 2015

The Executive Committee has today unanimously approved a set of proposals from the 2016 FIFA Reform Committee to pave the way for significant and much-needed changes to FIFA’s governance structure. The recommendations will be put before the Congress as proposed statutory changes for approval at its extraordinary session in Zurich on 26 February.

“These reforms are moving FIFA towards improved governance, greater transparency and more accountability. They mark a milestone on our path towards restoring FIFA’s credibility as a modern, trusted and professional sports organisation. This signals the beginning of a culture shift at FIFA. It is important to recognise that today’s recommendations build on the foundations established by the IGC in 2011 under Mark Pieth’s leadership, which included the creation of an independent chairman on the Audit and Compliance Committee and splitting the Ethics Committee into investigative and adjudicatory chambers,” explained FIFA’s Acting President Issa Hayatou. “As the February Congress approaches, I want to encourage all presidential candidates to embrace this spirit of reform and, as they campaign, to make clear their plans on how they would help FIFA enact these and other reform measures, should they be elected.”

The main reforms to be passed on to the Congress are:

· Term limits: maximum term limits of three terms of four years for the FIFA President as well as all members of the FIFA Council (see below), the Audit and Compliance Committee and the judicial bodies

· Separation of political and management functions: clear separation of “political” and management functions. The FIFA Council (replacing the FIFA Executive Committee) will be responsible for setting the organisation’s overall strategic direction, while the general secretariat will oversee the operational and commercial actions required to effectively execute that strategy.

o The members of the Council will be elected by the member associations of the respective region under FIFA’s electoral regulations, with a FIFA Review Committee to conduct comprehensive and enhanced integrity checks

o Concrete steps to increase the role of women in the governance of football with a minimum of one female representative elected as a Council member per confederation

· Diversity: promotion of women as an explicit statutory objective of FIFA to create a more diverse decision-making environment and culture

· Independent committee members: key financial decisions to be made by the Finance, Development and Governance Committees, which will have a minimum number of independent members and whose activities will be audited by the fully independent Audit and Compliance Committee

· Enhanced committee efficiency: reduction of standing committees from 26 to nine, with increased participation of the football community, which will provide efficiency while ensuring that all member associations are involved in a more meaningful and effective way

· Integrity checks: compulsory and comprehensive integrity checks for all members of FIFA’s standing committees, conducted by an independent FIFA review committee

· Greater transparency and inclusion through broader stakeholder representation: creation of a dedicated Football Stakeholders Committee to include members representing key stakeholders in the game, such as players, clubs and leagues

Building on FIFA’s commitment to human rights, the Executive Committee has recommended that the Congress approve the implementation of a new article to the FIFA statutes that commits FIFA to respecting all internationally recognised human rights and striving to promote the protection of these rights.

The Executive Committee also discussed the proposal from the 2016 FIFA Reform Committee to increase the number of teams at the FIFA World Cup™ finals from 32 to 40. There was no decision on this proposal, but it will be further debated.

...

FIFA

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