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105 members have voted

  1. 1. Should Blatter resign?

    • No
      16
    • Yes
      89
  2. 2. Should the elections for 2018 and 2022 be repeated?

    • No
      22
    • Yes (both)
      39
    • Yes (only 2018)
      0
    • Yes (only 2022)
      41
    • No, but the country, which bidded but lost, should host the next ones
      3
  3. 3. Should the bribery scandal be investigated by public authorities?

    • No - the FIFA ethic council will handle that perfectly
      7
    • Yes - the FIFA isn't able to handle it "in the family"
      98


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so the english press like to speculate a lot but as baron asked, when will we see the "smoking gun" documents? where are all the documents proving their accusations? Do they have it? Come on... This

Or Tony, you could *not* go on. That would be better, wouldn't it?

Shut the hell up. Honestly. Just shut up and leave.

The problem with FIFA is that every country has one vote, without regard to whether said association has contributed one bit to the advancement of football in the past 100 years or so. So, countries like Germany, France and England end up in the same category as, say, Papua New Guinea, the Federated States of Micronesia and Equatorial Guinea. Until that basic organizational defect is fixed, we will have Blatters left, right and centre - long after Blatter himself has left the joint. That said, he seems to develop a desire to stay in office well into his 80s.

No Arab prince, no relatively low-influence footballer like Ginola can challenge someone who (despite our dislike for him) has proven to be very savvy when it comes to two things: raising money and whipping votes. He has Africa and Asia, and parts of Latin America locked up. The only hope would be for a sportsman like Beckenbauer to challenge him and bring the house of cards down. But sadly, my country (Germany) has been loudly silent when it comes to Blatter's removal. We have no shot at hosting the Worlds anytime soon, and the Euros are not gonna come to Germany either (not counting the Euro 2020 continental fiesta). So, why hesitate?


It might be an idea to target FIFA under EU Competition Law: after all, they are abusing a market-dominant position...


Since Qatar is not gonna sink into the sea anytime soon and Blatter isn't budging on it (and neither is Platini), football fans should get their cardigans and scarves ready...that's gonna be one long winter, freezing one's backside off to go to a public viewing event...I also suspect that a Qatar World Cup won't be the ratings bonanza it usually is. The atmosphere is going to be 100% artificial and astroturfed. The country has no real history, which could enable spectators and audiences back home to ignore its blatant human rights abuses (China had history going for it during Beijing 2008).

Maybe UEFA should just withdraw from FIFA and see how the latter will survive without Europe.

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The problem with FIFA is that every country has one vote, without regard to whether said association has contributed one bit to the advancement of football in the past 100 years or so. So, countries like Germany, France and England end up in the same category as, say, Papua New Guinea, the Federated States of Micronesia and Equatorial Guinea. Until that basic organizational defect is fixed, we will have Blatters left, right and centre - long after Blatter himself has left the joint. That said, he seems to develop a desire to stay in office well into his 80s.

No Arab prince, no relatively low-influence footballer like Ginola can challenge someone who (despite our dislike for him) has proven to be very savvy when it comes to two things: raising money and whipping votes. He has Africa and Asia, and parts of Latin America locked up. The only hope would be for a sportsman like Beckenbauer to challenge him and bring the house of cards down. But sadly, my country (Germany) has been loudly silent when it comes to Blatter's removal. We have no shot at hosting the Worlds anytime soon, and the Euros are not gonna come to Germany either (not counting the Euro 2020 continental fiesta). So, why hesitate?

It might be an idea to target FIFA under EU Competition Law: after all, they are abusing a market-dominant position...

Since Qatar is not gonna sink into the sea anytime soon and Blatter isn't budging on it (and neither is Platini), football fans should get their cardigans and scarves ready...that's gonna be one long winter, freezing one's backside off to go to a public viewing event...I also suspect that a Qatar World Cup won't be the ratings bonanza it usually is. The atmosphere is going to be 100% artificial and astroturfed. The country has no real history, which could enable spectators and audiences back home to ignore its blatant human rights abuses (China had history going for it during Beijing 2008).

Maybe UEFA should just withdraw from FIFA and see how the latter will survive without Europe.

We will most likely get Euro 2024, but yes, DFB could be far more vocal. Just leave Beckenbauer in Kitzbühel...

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Scandal-hit Fifa lose three more major sponsors

Three of Fifa’s sponsors during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil have joined Sony and Emirates in declining to renew their contracts with the scandal-hit world governing body.

Castrol, Continental Tyres and Johnson & Johnson – so-called second-tier sponsors that had a high-profile presence in Brazil – have confirmed they have not renewed their deals.

Though none linked their decisions to the latest scandals to wash over Fifa following its much-criticised investigation into the controversial bidding race for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, it will increase the pressure on the organisation led by Sepp Blatter.

All three confirmed to the Daily Telegraph they had decided not to renew their contracts for a variety of reasons.

Sponsors bring in at least $1.5bn in revenue over each four-year cycle. Continental Tyres had been a World Cup sponsor since 2010, Castrol since 2008 and Johnson & Johnson signed a deal for a single cycle in 2011. Its decision not to renew will increase fears in Zurich that Fifa’s image is becoming unsuitable for global brands and will force its commercial department to look more to regional sponsors to fill the roster.

Increasingly, Fifa is likely to look to companies in Russia and the Middle East – the regions that will play host to the next two World Cups – to fill the gap. There are also plans to introduce more regional sponsorship tiers in an attempt to target developing markets.

Those campaigning for reform at Fifa have long argued it is only through pressure from sponsors and broadcasters, who pour money into its coffers, that enough pressure will build to force fundamental change.

Visa, Adidas and Sony delivered coded warnings over the bribery and corruption allegations that engulfed Fifa on the eve of the Brazil World Cup, calling on the governing body to ensure the claims were properly investigated.

It emerged late last year that Sony and Emirates, two of Fifa’s six top-tier partners, would end their relationships with the governing body, which is hopeful of replacing them with Samsung and Qatar Air respectively.

Adidas, which has a longstanding close relationship with Fifa and Blatter, recently renewed its sponsorship deal until 2030 while Visa’s contract runs until 2022. Coca-Cola, which became Fifa’s first sponsor in 1978, also has a long-term deal.

Fifa’s top-tier sponsors pay between $24m and $44m a year, while second-tier World Cup sponsors – who also included Budweiser, MTN and McDonalds – pay an estimated $10m to $25m a year.

Last year Michael Hershman, a former member of Fifa’s independent governance committee and co-founder of Transparency International, criticised sponsors for not stepping up to the plate.

“They have simply paid lip service,” he said. “Saying in press releases: ‘Oh yes, the sport needs a greater degree of integrity and transparency.’ But they haven’t put their money where their mouth is.”

Increasingly, brands have sought to focus on their relationship with the glamour of the World Cup and “fan engagement” campaigns rather than with the tainted Fifa brand. However, confirmation of the latest wave of non-renewals could lead other sponsors to consider their positions.

Fifa’s marketing director, Thierry Weil, told the Guardian on Friday: “Rotations at the end of a sponsorship cycle are commonplace in the sports industry and have continuously occurred since the commercialisation of the World Cup began. It is natural that as brands’ strategies evolve they reassess their sponsorship properties. The contracts with Castrol, Continental and Johnson&Johnson were always planned to run until the end of 2014 and therefore expired on 31 December 2014 accordingly.

“As in previous Fifa World Cup cycles, we are now in advanced negotiations with a number of companies related to sponsorship agreements in all three of our categories, ranging from Tier 1 Fifa Partners, Tier 2 Fifa World Cup Sponsors and Tier 3 Regional Supporters. Each category provides tailored marketing opportunities for companies with a range of varying rights and we expect interest to grow even more as the Confederations Cup 2017 and 2018 World Cup draw closer.”

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/jan/23/fifa-lose-three-sponsors-castrol-continental-tyres-johnson-and-johnson

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Former Barcelona and Real Madrid midfielder Luis Figo to stand for Fifa presidency

Former world footballer of the year Luis Figo has become the latest candidate to throw his hat into an increasingly crowded ring in the battle to unseat Sepp Blatter as Fifa president.

As Dutch FA president Michael van Praag outlined his credentials in Amsterdam, Figo unveiled his candidature and claimed he had the requisite five nominations from among Fifa’s 209 members.

“I look at the reputation of Fifa right now and I don’t like it. Football deserves better,” said the former Barcelona and Real Madrid player. “Football has given me so much during my life, and I want to give something back to the game.”

Figo, who is funding his own campaign, said the tipping point had been the chaos surrounding the suppression of Michael Garcia’s full report into the controversial bidding race for the 2018 World Cup in Russia and the 2022 tournament in Qatar.

“Throughout my career I have worked at all levels of the game,” he said. “This has given me a unique insight and understanding that I feel can enhance the discussion about the future of Fifa and the future of football.”

The former Portuguese international was immediately backed by his compatriot, José Mourinho, who said: “Luis Figo’s candidacy is a great step forward for football. His career over many years grants a better future for Fifa.

“I believe in his character and determination, as well as his passion for the game. He will be a president focused on football and its general improvement, acting closely with all federations.”

Figo and Van Praag have joined Prince Ali of Jordan, who will be nominated by the English FA at a board meeting on Thursday, in emerging as contenders who will have gained the requisite nominations by Thursday’s deadline.

Former Fifa executive Jérôme Champagne, a one-time Blatter ally who has been campaigning for nearly a year, is still hoping to make it over the threshold. Former France international David Ginola is also campaigning as part of a publicity stunt by a bookmaking firm. Meanwhile, football agent Mino Raiola said he had pulled out.

The emergence of at least three credible opponents to Blatter will be seen as part of a so-called “multi-ball” strategy that has been discussed by those who want to see the 78-year old Swiss unseated after 40 years at Fifa and 17 as president.

Uefa president Michel Platini, who decided against standing himself last year, hopes that it will help foment opposition to Blatter. It is likely that support will eventually coalesce behind one opponent to Blatter ahead of the vote on 29 May.

“Credible candidates with new ideas will hopefully add to an open debate in the campaign,” said a Uefa spokesman. “It is good for Fifa, and it is good for football to have valid candidates with extensive experience in the sport, and from different parts of the world.”

Van Praag kicked off his campaign by dangling a carrot to those confederations that have formed the bedrock of Blatter’s support in Africa, South America, Oceania, Asia and the Concacaf region by promising to enlarge the World Cup to include more countries from outside Europe.

The uphill challenge faced by all the pretenders to the presidency is in convincing those confederations, who have each benefitted down the years from Blatter’s Goal programme to redistribute the World Cup bounty, to turn their backs on him.

Van Praag said he had nothing against Blatter personally. “In fact I like him a lot as a person,” he said. “But someone who has led an organisation for so many years and has become the personification of its image can’t be the face of its modernisation operation or a new Fifa.”

Blatter, whose tenure has been marked by endless controversy and crises, has been president since 1998 and backtracked on a previous promise to make his current term his last.

The 78-year-old needs two-thirds of the votes for victory in a first round of secret balloting of the 209 members in Zurich at Fifa’s Congress in May, or a simple majority in subsequent rounds.

Van Praag, who said he would only serve one term if he won, said he had told Blatter that he should step aside and take up a position as an adviser. He called for greater transparency of Fifa’s finances including the president’s salary and a “normalisation” programme to repair its battered reputation.

He denied there was any co-ordination with other anti-Blatter candidates.

“I don’t know Prince Ali, I never met him. I don’t know Mr Figo either. I am happy to welcome other candidates. There is no co-ordination, I am doing it myself,” he said.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/jan/28/luis-figo-fifa-presidency

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FIFA Confirms 4 Contenders for Presidential Election Race

Three men remain in contention to challenge Sepp Blatter for the FIFA presidency.

FIFA's election oversight panel confirmed Monday that Blatter and three rivals — Prince Ali bin al-Hussein of Jordan, Michael van Praag of the Netherlands and former Portugal great Luis Figo — are now being vetted to become formal candidates after the close of nominations.

A potential fifth contender, former FIFA official Jerome Champagne, failed to secure the required five nominations. He said only three of FIFA's 209 member federations nominated him by last Thursday's deadline.

The four contenders will now undergo integrity checks by FIFA's ethics committee, and have their nomination papers scrutinized by the oversight panel.

The election panel expects to "formally admit and declare the candidates who are eligible for the office of FIFA President" in about two weeks.

The election will be held May 29 at FIFA's congress in Zurich.

Blatter, who will turn 79 before election day, is seeking a fifth term in office to extend his 17-year reign.

The veteran Swiss official, who has worked for FIFA since 1975, is strongly favored to win. UEFA, which has 53 voting members, is the only one among six continental bodies actively opposing Blatter.

The campaign kicks off largely as Blatter vs. European interests.

Prince Ali and Figo have been encouraged to run by UEFA and its president, Michel Platini, while Van Praag is a member of UEFA's executive committee.

Champagne criticized Platini, who decided last August not to run against former mentor Blatter.

"The script of the next few weeks and months calls for proxy candidates to wage the battles that others did not have the courage to fight," said Champagne, whose departure as FIFA international relations director in 2010 was forced in part by Platini.

Of the four contenders, only Van Praag has so far set out specific ideas.

The 67-year-old Dutch federation president has called for expanding the 32-team World Cup to include more non-European teams, and has promised to serve just a single four-year term to modernize FIFA.

Van Praag has asked Blatter to step aside and has offered him an advisory role, including running a charitable foundation to give less privileged children opportunities in football.

Prince Ali, the FIFA vice president for Asia, is uncertain of widespread support in his home region. The Asian Football Confederation has long stated its support for Blatter.

The prince is scheduled to host a campaign launch in London this week.

AP

http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireStory/fifa-confirms-contenders-presidential-election-race-28657647

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  • 3 weeks later...

FIFA candidate Figo proposes 48-team World Cup

London (AFP) - Former Portugal winger Luis Figo launched his campaign for the FIFA presidency on Thursday by revealing plans to expand the World Cup to up to 48 teams.

Unveiling his manifesto at Wembley Stadium in London, the 42-year-old said the expansion of the quadrennial tournament from its current 32-team format would be "weighted towards non-European teams".

One of his proposals for the World Cup is to split it into two 24-team tournaments played simultaneously on two different continents, followed by a final knockout stage in one country.

He said the expanded format, which could be a 40-team or 48-team World Cup, would only add three or four days to the duration of the tournament.

Another of his key proposals is the distribution of half of FIFA's revenues -- $2.5 billion (2.19 billion euros) -- to national associations for spending on grassroots football.

The former Barcelona and Real Madrid superstar also called for the restoration of the 'old' interpretation of the offside rule, "where a player is judged offside whether directly involved in the play or not".

Other suggestions included a debate about the use of extra technology and the testing of sin-bins for incidents of "unsporting behaviour to referees".

Figo is standing against incumbent Sepp Blatter, Dutch football chief Michael van Praag and FIFA vice-president for Asia Prince Ali bin Al Hussein in the FIFA presidential election on May 29.

Like van Praag and Ali, Figo has called for the world governing body to become more transparent following a series of corruption scandals under long-serving president Blatter.

AFP
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I like Luis Figo as a contender - he was a successful player and, quite evidently, he has recognized a path that may finally get rid of Blatter. Expanding the World Cup and redistributing the money to strengthen the national associations and the grassroots may just be the trick needed to end the Swiss Fondue presidency. Plus, it spares us Platini, who quite evidently lacks the chutzpah to force Blatter to resign.

Sepp jumped the shark with Qatar 2022 - it's time he got lost and retired to a little châlet in Switzerland...especially since my preferred option for him, prosecution and conviction for corruption is (from the state of play right now, anyway) fairly unlikely.

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FIFA candidate Figo proposes 48-team World Cup

London (AFP) - Former Portugal winger Luis Figo launched his campaign for the FIFA presidency on Thursday by revealing plans to expand the World Cup to up to 48 teams.

Ugh. The tournament itself is the one thing FIFA gets right. Don't touch that!

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  • 2 weeks later...

LONDON (AP) - Sepp Blatter and his three FIFA presidential election rivals have been invited to participate in a television debate by the BBC and Sky.

The London-based broadcasters have written to the candidates proposing a one-hour "fans' congress" live on their globally available channels, websites and Facebook ahead of the election in May.

The 78-year-old Blatter is seeking a fifth, four-year term running football. FIFA Vice President Prince Ali bin al-Hussein of Jordan, Portugal great Luis Figo and Dutch football association chief Michael van Praag want to end Blatter's reign, which began in 1998.

Prince Ali and Figo have already said publicly they are willing to participate in a debate. In a letter to Blatter seen by The Associated Press, Sky and BBC wrote: "There is significant interest from other candidates."

The broadcasters would invite supporters representing the 209 FIFA member nations to the debate, with questions coming from the audience and viewers worldwide. They want to air the debate in April or May and a moderator is yet to be decided.

Unlike his rivals, Blatter has not published any details of his plans for FIFA if he wins the secret May 29 election of the 209 national associations.

"We believe this will present an unprecedented opportunity for the candidates to set out their plans and communicate directly with fans from around the world," Sky News said in a statement. "We hope for a positive response from all four candidates."

The English Football Association, which has been one of the most vocal anti-Blatter voices in world football, offered its national stadium as a debate location.

"I would love to see the four candidates for this election get in a room together and be questioned," FA chairman Greg Dyke said. "We would happily host it at Wembley."

http://m.apnews.com/ap/db_307134/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=YZfpdPRG

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Blatter will refuse to participate, citing the dignity of the office and not wanting to engage in showmanship or some other tired excuse along these lines. Besides, he has nothing to gain from it: the audience are fans who despise him, would throw more skilled questions at him than any of the (pliant) journalists who would be selected to moderate the debate. In addition based on all relevant metrics, he is the frontrunner in the race to become FIFA President.

Further, by participating and not being able to coherently justify his actions (which he can't), he would end up looking even more like a fool, which might swing a few votes the wrong direction. So, why take the risk if the real constituency is the FIFA delegates anyway?

In short: He couldn't care less, he won't do it.

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Blatter will refuse to participate, citing the dignity of the office and not wanting to engage in showmanship or some other tired excuse along these lines. Besides, he has nothing to gain from it: the audience are fans who despise him, would throw more skilled questions at him than any of the (pliant) journalists who would be selected to moderate the debate. In addition based on all relevant metrics, he is the frontrunner in the race to become FIFA President.

Further, by participating and not being able to coherently justify his actions (which he can't), he would end up looking even more like a fool, which might swing a few votes the wrong direction. So, why take the risk if the real constituency is the FIFA delegates anyway?

In short: He couldn't care less, he won't do it.

You're almost certainly right of course, and I'm sure the BBC and Sky and the FA knows this too. Really it is an internal election and it doesn't need a public debate on TV, but a little bit of pressure on Blatter from our broadcasters and FA - even if they are being cheeky - can't be a bad thing. :)

Ah, come on now Sepp, won't you have a nice debate with the other lads?

father-ted-mrs-doyle-go-on-sign-reaction

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  • 3 weeks later...

Gill set to lead 'awkward squad' exposing wrongdoing at FIFA

Manchester United director David Gill is set to be elected a FIFA vice president this week on a mission to be part of an "awkward squad" trying to expose any wrongdoing at the scandal-tainted governing body.

Gill was initially reluctant to contest the FIFA role reserved for the British associations due to his dislike of Sepp Blatter but he was convinced to stand by the English Football Association and UEFA President Michel Platini.

With the 79-year-old Blatter tipped to be re-elected for a fifth, four-year term in May, the English FA nominated Gill so he could ask tough questions of FIFA's management from within the organization.

"David will be the sort of person who will do the job as a FIFA executive committee member properly," English FA chairman Greg Dyke said. "He will not be afraid of asking appropriate questions. In fact perhaps FIFA needs to have someone from the awkward squad asking tough questions.

"He has a strong background in finance so if there are financial questions he will know what to ask and what to look for. There is a feeling that there have been too many acolytes and not enough people asking difficult questions and ensuring that decisions are taken in a transparent, ethical and business-like manner."

Britain has a guaranteed FIFA vice presidency, but for the first time it will be chosen by all UEFA members and not by the four home nations alone. Gill is expected to easily beat rival candidate Trefor Lloyd Hughes, the Wales FA head, in the vote at the UEFA Congress on Tuesday. The winner replaces the vocal Jim Boyce of Northern Ireland on FIFA's ruling executive committee in May.

Gill, a former accountant, had key roles at Manchester United during an unprecedented period of success under Alex Ferguson, rising to chief executive before stepping down in 2013 when the manager retired. Gill, an FA vice chairman, and Ferguson remain at United as directors without day-to-day influence on the team managed by Louis van Gaal.

Since being elected to UEFA's executive committee in 2013, Gill has maintained a low public profile but made an impact at last year's FIFA Congress by calling on Blatter to stand aside. Platini was reluctant to challenge Blatter for the top job in world football but urged Gill to bid to join him on FIFA's executive committee.

"I aim to use my skills in football around the table and work with my UEFA colleagues to have a greater say and influence in how it operates. In terms of votes it's quite an important block," Gill said. "In areas like transparency and decision-making, it's not going to happen overnight and it's arguable whether it will happen unless there is a president change.

"My personal view is that it needs a change at the top to ensure that the required changes take place. I'm not naive enough to think I can change things overnight."

Gill would be joining the FIFA executive committee after the May 29 presidential election. FIFA Vice President Prince Ali bin al-Hussein of Jordan, Dutch football chief Michael van Praag and Portugal great Luis Figo are challenging Blatter in the secret ballot of FIFA's 209 member associations.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/soccer/2015/03/22/gill-set-to-lead-awkward-squad-exposing-wrongdoing-at-fifa/25177427/

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  • 3 weeks later...

Africa promises Blatter unanimous support

Every one of Africa's 54 member countries will vote for Sepp Blatter in next month's FIFA presidential election, the continent's soccer boss said on Tuesday, referring to the 79-year-old Swiss as "dear Sepp."

In front of Blatter's three challengers, Issa Hayatou, president of the Confederation of African Football, promised unanimous support in his speech to open CAF's annual congress in Cairo.

African football leaders applauded his pledge in apparent agreement.

"Africa is comfortable having you. Africa stays with you," Hayatou said to Blatter, according to a transcript of his comments provided by CAF.

Blatter was present in his role as FIFA president, and made a speech to the delegates, where he praised Hayatou as "a pillar" of African football, according to CAF.

"I'm a happy man," Blatter said.

Africa is the largest of the six continental confederations and has 54 of the 209 FIFA member countries eligible to vote in the presidential election in Zurich on May 29.

Although the individual countries don't have to follow Hayatou's directive, the continent is expected to be a strong base of support for Blatter when he seeks a fifth term to extend a presidency that began in 1998.

FIFA vice president Prince Ali bin al-Hussein of Jordan, Dutch FA head Michael van Praag, and former Portugal international Luis Figo are standing against him.

Hayatou, who has led CAF since 1988 and is senior FIFA vice president, also removed a hurdle to his own possible re-election as African football head when the congress voted to remove CAF's age limits.

Like Blatter, the 68-year-old Hayatou said his current term would be his last, but also appears ready to go back on his promise and stand again in 2017. The rule changes removed restrictions on candidates who are 70 or older running for CAF office, and mean Hayatou could stand again in two years, and maybe take his reign beyond 30 years.

The changes were passed unanimously, CAF said.

CAF also elected two new members of FIFA's executive committee: Tunisia's Tarek Bouchamaoui and Congo's Constant Omari Selemani. They will serve two-year terms, and not the normal four years because of another change to CAF's statutes. From 2017, African places on FIFA's ruling board will be decided by region, CAF said.

Jacques Anouma of Ivory Coast, who was prevented from standing against Hayatou in the last CAF presidential election, failed to keep his FIFA seat in Tuesday's elections. Mohamed Raouraoua of Algeria, who is viewed as a possible future challenger to Hayatou, didn't stand for re-election and also left FIFA's executive committee.

Six members were re-elected to CAF's executive committee, all of them unopposed.

Africa's expected show of support for Blatter indicated that while the appetite for change at the top of world soccer is strong in Europe, it isn't everywhere else.

The praise Blatter received in Egypt was in contrast to his uncomfortable reception at the UEFA congress in Austria last month, when his presidency was criticized by the three candidates standing against him, and some European officials.

Blatter's three presidential challengers didn't address CAF delegates like they did at UEFA's congress and attended the CAF congress only as "observers," CAF said.

Cameroon's Hayatou, now an ally of Blatter after failing to unseat him as FIFA president in 2002, made an apparent reference to that UEFA congress.

"Dear Sepp," Hayatou said. "I want to reiterate that here in Africa you are never on some strange or hostile territory. You shall always be at home here, on this continent."

Blatter later gave an angry response to a reporter questioning his support of Hayatou, who has been the target of corruption allegations and was reprimanded by the IOC in 2011 for receiving money in a World Cup kickbacks scandal in the mid-1990s.

"This is an absolute disgusting declaration that you are doing here. I reject it," Blatter told the reporter.

AP

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/01e55e7adca74fe691b35c43ce061065/hayatou-all-africa-will-vote-blatter

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Bought by Blatter - lock, stock and barrel. No one in their right mind would support septugenarian Blatter - unless, of course, they were dependent on him for cash payments...

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No wonder they are the MOST backward continent on the planet. If they cannot think their way out of a relatively simple thing like a sports organization, then what more the more pressing, relevant, complex, life-and-death issues confronting them? Can't believe they can be THAT stupid.

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No wonder they are the MOST backward continent on the planet. If they cannot think their way out of a relatively simple thing like a sports organization, then what more the more pressing, relevant, complex, life-and-death issues confronting them? Can't believe they can be THAT stupid.

Frankly, none of this would be happening if FIFA had long abandoned the politically correct system of "one country, one vote". Why should countries ranking well below in the official rankings and having made NO contribution to world football (yes, I'm looking at you Qatar, Djibouti and Uzbekistan...) have the same number of votes in the FIFA organs as, say, Germany, France, the Home Countries, Australia, Nigeria or, I don't know, Brazil?!?

At least the IOC co-opts its members - but FIFA takes it to the other extreme. Sure, let every nation have at least one vote...but give more votes to those countries actually getting things done in the sport, instead of doling them out equally so that every year FIFA execs can pat themselves on the back and tell themselves just how committed they supposedly are to the notion of equality.

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No wonder they are the MOST backward continent on the planet. If they cannot think their way out of a relatively simple thing like a sports organization, then what more the more pressing, relevant, complex, life-and-death issues confronting them? Can't believe they can be THAT stupid.

Hmm, nations from Africa doing what countries on every other continent is doing - backing a corrupt *Eurpoean* organization... is proof that *Africans* are stupid and the most backward on earth. Hmmm, it can't just be that... gotta be something else baron doesn't like about Africa.

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