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The "Lost" London Games (1908) Poster ...


Sir Rols

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I was trawling around some Olympic sites this morning, as one does, and came across a bit of trivia the Olympics graphics enthusiasts (or baron for edition 2 of the tome) might find interesting.

Anyway, inspired by Sochi's look, I was perusing the "Olympic Look" online gallery (if you haven't come across it before, this is a GREAT site for anything to do with the graphical elements of the games over history) and stumbled upon a bit of graphics trivia I didn't know about. Or at least I haven't seen any mention of it before.

Now, I guess we're all here well acquainted with the usual pantheon of posters for the various games celebrations over the years. The historical series of "official" posters for each games. And how London 1908 is just about always represented by the program cover of the games:

london1908.jpg

Now according to "Olympic Look" in its "Incorrect Use" segment, while there wasn't ever an "official" poster for the games, in 2006, a draft for an actual "official" poster was found in England.

olympic_%20poster_1908_drummond_downes.jpg

Was there any coverage about this in Britain when this was supposedly discovered in 2006?

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Oddly enuf, Rols, I saw that same thing today. I don't know if I'll include in the new edition--it's a whole new ball of wax plus I already might have some 20 new, additional pages lined up.

(BTW, thanks to you, Smokey's in there now in Chap 3. Was able to buy an image from LA84.)

I imagine you got this from Markus Osterwalder's site? I actually just heard from him today re the SV 1960 torch...and his version got countermanded by another source from California...so I don't know how legitimate the 'new' discovery might be.

I am still on the trail of the last of the Coubertin bloodline since the old gran-granpere supposedly did not have progeny. ;)

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Oddly enuf, Rols, I saw that same thing today. I don't know if I'll include in the new edition--it's a whole new ball of wax plus I already might have some 20 new, additional pages lined up.

(BTW, thanks to you, Smokey's in there now in Chap 3. Was able to buy an image from LA84.)

I imagine you got this from Markus Osterwalder's site? I actually just heard from him today re the SV 1960 torch...and his version got countermanded by another source from California...so I don't know how legitimate the 'new' discovery might be.

I am still on the trail of the last of the Coubertin bloodline since the old gran-granpere supposedly did not have progeny. ;)

WE must have had the same idea - yeah, it was the Osterwalder site. I checked in there to compare after seeing the Sochi look. It's such a great site. I'd love to post things here from it, but I don't want to impinge on his work - he's done some great work for that site.

I was interested to see his comments on the Munich 1972 logo as well, and how everyone (including the IOC itself) tends to use the "wrong" '72 logo.

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  • 1 year later...

Just came across this great news story.

London 2012: Stylish start for 1908 Olympic Games

_59825995_toastmaster.jpg

The 1908 Olympic Games in London opened exactly 104 years ago. At the helm was a charismatic announcer and his distinctive megaphone.

Dressed in top hat and tails and using a large metal megaphone, City Toastmaster William Knightsmith started the London Games in style.

Described by his descendents as "the voice that millions knew", he was the PA for the six month-long Fourth Olympiad.

Presiding over every event, most of which were held at the purpose-built White City Stadium in Shepherd's Bush, it was the pinnacle of his distinguished career.

His involvement in the Games has fascinated great grandson Patrick Stevenson, 66, who said: "I knew of the story as it was part of family folklore."

'Good voice'

And he has since had access to the megaphone - which forms part of Saracens rugby club chairman Nigel Wray's vast collection of British sporting memorabilia.

The 1908 Games were officially opened on 27 April by HRH King Edward VII and stretched out over six months.

...

more at BBC

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