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Rio 2016 Preparations - Venue & Infrastructure Developments


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I've actually wondered why the North Sydney Pool wasn't converted for use as the diving pool for the 2000 Olympics. While Homebush is an amazing venue, it would have offered the 2000 Games a similar perspective as the famous diving events from Barcelona. Missed opportunity:

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Rio is going to be absolutely incredible.

Love that pool, built for the 1938 Commonwealth Games.

Diving would have been good, but they actually had to quickly nominate (and build/ refurb) a second pool for water polo when the womens event was added. I thought North Sydney was a no brainer. The weather was spectacular during Sydney 2000 (except a day and a half) so it would have worked a treat!

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F**K Tony! Are you that desperate to post that now you come up with this? It gets harder to defend you when you pull sh!t like this.

'Olympic venue on time' (if indeed it is) isn't news anywhere in the world Danny. It's what's expected of a host. Thanks for the pictures Bezzi.

Love that pool, built for the 1938 Commonwealth Games.

Diving would have been good, but they actually had to quickly nominate (and build/ refurb) a second pool for water polo when the womens event was added. I thought North Sydney was a no brainer. The weather was spectacular during Sydney 2000 (except a day and a half) so it would have worked a treat!

Yeah, missed opportunity.

I remember one of the critiques from one of the major broadcasters, could have been NBC, that one of the few faults they could find was that the games weren't as integrated into the downtown city as they could have been, and yeah, old North Sydney pool would have been a great way to help with that.

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Ah! Wonderful memories of the Fort. :rolleyes: I visited there on the afternoon just before the opening of the PanAms then we got stuck in traffic and barely got to the stadium in time. I had to change clothes in the line to the stadium gates, right in front of the Canadian delegation bus. It's my Rio 2007 story.

Really worth the visit and a very scenic site for olympic diving.

Typical...

morde-e-assopra-ctv-hdtv.png

<_<

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At last, the progress is starting to speed up.

The picture apparently is from 24th January, I think it's the same one posted here on page 10 on 25th January. At the time you were worried about the state of progress, now with the same pic, it's starting to speed up. OK.

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The picture apparently is from 24th January, I think it's the same one posted here on page 10 on 25th January. At the time you were worried about the state of progress, now with the same pic, it's starting to speed up. OK.

Your right. Anyway, I might of been wrong with being worried. At least it's rising out of the ground slowly.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Work has begun on the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Velodrome. Work began on 20th February 2014, but this article was only published today - http://www.aroundtherings.com/site/A__46272/Title__City-of-Rio-Starts-Work-on-Velodrome/292/Articles - Source: Around The Rings.

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Looks like it's gonna be like Athens 2004, as IOC's ex-president, Dr. Jacques Rogge (BEL) compared them to Zorbas Syrtaki's musical performance. It begins real slow, then after the London games they were demanded to hurry up, leaving you with no trace to follow its real pace

It has been proved like this: http://youtu.be/kueQJ3v5AFI

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  • 4 weeks later...

Sports chief: Brazil government must act on Rio

BELEK, Turkey (AP) - The head of Olympic summer sports federations called for urgent action Tuesday to tackle the critical delays facing the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro and accused the Brazilian government of neglecting the crisis.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Francesco Ricci Bitti said Rio's troubled preparations are reaching a stage where some sports may need to consider "Plan B" options for their venues.

"It's getting very serious," the Italian said. "We have an organizing committee with good people but without the leverage to cope with the problem. ... We are scared. This is not a country like China where you can ask people to work by night. In Brazil, this could not happen. The government has to change speed."

Ricci Bitti heads the Association of Summer Olympic International Federations, which represents the 28 sports in the Rio Games. He also leads the International Tennis Federation and serves on the IOC coordination commission for Rio, which made its latest visit to Brazil two weeks ago.

"We can be flexible in the infrastructure but surely not in the sports venues, and we are at risk at sports venues," Ricci Bitti said. "Even for the ones that don't consider themselves at risk, we don't see a sense of urgency."

The timetables are so tight that backup plans may need to be considered by some sports, he said.

"We have to sit down and to start looking at some Plan B's," Ricci Bitti said.

Rio's problems dominated discussions at the ASOIF general assembly, which took place during the SportAccord convention in this Mediterranean resort in southern Turkey. Rio will also top the agenda for meetings of the International Olympic Committee executive board, which meets here Wednesday and Thursday.

"We need to act now because if we wait another six months, as it could be looking at the inactivity of the government, I think it will become very serious," Ricci Bitti said. "The organizing committee is doing its best, but the government is not supporting enough."

Brazil is also struggling with delays ahead of hosting the World Cup this summer. With the country focusing on the World Cup, Ricci Bitti said, the Olympic preparations risk falling further behind.

"We can't always hope in the fact that in the end we will solve the problem," he said. "This time we have the style and the habits of the South Americans. They are not used to managing big events like this. The Olympics is a very different problem from the World Cup. The World Cup in the end is one stadium, one hotel, in many cities. Rio has a lot of problems."

Rio organizing committee chief Carlos Nuzman and CEO Sidney Levy were meeting in Brasilia on Tuesday with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's chief of staff to discuss the Olympics.

It was left to Rio's executive sports director, Agberto Guimaraes, to report to the federations in Turkey.

"I still think we can pull this thing together and can have great games," he told the delegates. "The moment I don't I will (give) my resignation. I still believe we can do it. Please help me get through this alive and well."

Christophe Dubi, the IOC's deputy executive director for the Olympic Games, said the IOC would be sending special task forces to Rio to monitor the situation. The first group will consist of construction experts, he said.

"We have to have special measures in place," he said.

Dubi noted that Gilbert Felli, the IOC's long-time executive director, has been assigned to work with Rio after he steps down from his post later this year.

The meetings in Turkey come amid a daily drumbeat of troubles in Brazil. On Monday, striking construction workers and security personnel clashed at Rio's Olympic Park. Random gunshots were fired but no injuries were reported.

Workers also went on strike Monday at the Olympic stadium that will be used for track and field at the games. The venue has been closed since last year to fix problems with the roof.

Guimaraes said the repair work would completed by December.

The greatest concerns center on the Deodoro complex, an area that is to host venues for eight sports. Work has yet to begin on the site.

In addition, work on the Olympic golf course is far behind schedule, raising concerns for the sport's return to the games after more than a century. Guimaraes said grass would begin to be laid on the course later this month and the venue would be ready by September 2015.

AP

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The tone of the warnings from the stakeholders is beginning to echo what we heard in the run up to Athens 2004. Let's hope the outcome, at least in terms of how the Games are hosted, is similar.

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The tone of the warnings from the stakeholders is beginning to echo what we heard in the run up to Athens 2004. Let's hope the outcome, at least in terms of how the Games are hosted, is similar.

Amen to that. I don't remember Athens having a whole cluster that hadn't even been started two years out though.

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Democracy... free market.... sure is messy. Time to stop giving these sorts of countries the games and stick to authoritarian dictators.

Well, he kind of hinted at that when he talked about the Chinese working through the night.

The problem isn't just democracy. It's this particular democracy and the struggles of a developing nation that has never faced this type of challenge before and is still struggling with World Cup preparations.

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Well, obviously it is possible to have decent preparations in democratic nations: UK, Canada, USA, Australia....

They can deliver, but there's always risks when workers have the right to strike, voters can squash bond issueances *cough*Denver*cough*.

Much easier where there's a supreme ruler around.

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