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Rio 2016 Preparations - Venue & Infrastructure Developments


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F**K Tony! Are you that desperate to post that now you come up with this? It gets harder to defend you when you pull sh!t like this.

'Olympic venue on time' (if indeed it is) isn't news anywhere in the world Danny. It's what's expected of a host. Thanks for the pictures Bezzi.

MOSCOW — Swimming's world governing body FINA has strongly criticized the organizers of next year's Olympics in Rio de Janeiro over what it says are substandard facilities and "disrespect" for aquatic events.

FINA, which oversees some of the Olympics' most-watched events, attacked the organizers and Rio mayor Eduardo Paes on various grounds including slashing the seating capacity at the main pool, according to a FINA letter obtained by The Associated Press.

Athletes' health and safety could be at risk over viruses in the area of sea used for open water swimming events and organizers' decision to use an open-air venue for diving, water polo and synchronized swimming, FINA warns.

The letter, dated Monday and addressed by FINA president Julio Maglione to Paes and the organizing committee, was circulated among leading swimming figures.

It suggests relations are at breaking point.

"The recent decisions of Mr. Eduardo Paes ... are seriously damaging the image and value of FINA and its disciplines," the letter states. "This situation is in clear disrespect for the FINA requirements concerning aquatic venues, and will negatively affect the safety conditions and the level of performances of our athletes."

Four-time Olympic swimming champion Alexander Popov is quoted in the letter as saying that swimming conditions in Rio would be "a step back in relation to previous editions" of the Olympics.

FINA is particularly critical of changes to the Olympic Aquatics Stadium, the main pool for swimming's most-watched events. FINA says design changes mean the stadium will seat only between 12,500 and 13,000 people compared to 17,500 for the main pool at the last Olympics in London.

"Therefore, the main venue of the leading sport from the Olympic movement ... is diminished in terms of importance and value," the letter states.

"Providing less available space for TV, media, athletes and spectators, this will naturally have its negative impact in terms of the coverage of the Olympic competition and in terms of working conditions for all those using the venue."

The letter demands testing for virus levels in the water off the Copacabana beach, which will be used for men's and women's marathon swimming events. Organizers agreed to test for viruses earlier this month after earlier insisting that only bacterial testing was required.

That came after the AP released a five-month independent study showing high levels of viruses at Olympic venues for sailing, rowing, canoeing, triathlon and open-water swimming. About 1,400 athletes will compete in the hazardous waters.

The FINA letter also says athletes' safety is at risk from a decision not to put a roof over the open-air Maria Lenk Aquatic Park, which will hold the diving, water polo and synchronized swimming events. All took place indoors at London 2012.

"The weather conditions may influence not only the athletes' performances, but more importantly their health and safety," the letter warns, going on to criticize Paes for refusing proposals to put a temporary cover on the arena.

FINA's criticisms attracted support from Vladimir Salnikov, the influential head of Russia's swimming federation, who said "these problems have to be solved on time" and that earlier recommendations from FINA "obviously haven't been listened to," in comments Wednesday to Russian agency R-Sport.

AP Sports Writer Andrew Dampf in Rome contributed.

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I get FINA's complaints about the open water conditions but the rest of it is downright ridiculous and part of the reason why the pricetag has gotten so out of hand in the Olympics. 13,500 seats at the main Olympics aquatics stadium is plenty. Even worse is the complaining about the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center. Worried about the athlete's health because of no roof? That wasn't an issue in Athens, Barcelona, or Los Angeles. Why is it an issue now? If FINA wants a roof, they need to pay for it themselves.

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I get FINA's complaints about the open water conditions but the rest of it is downright ridiculous and part of the reason why the pricetag has gotten so out of hand in the Olympics. 13,500 seats at the main Olympics aquatics stadium is plenty. Even worse is the complaining about the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center. Worried about the athlete's health because of no roof? That wasn't an issue in Athens, Barcelona, or Los Angeles. Why is it an issue now? If FINA wants a roof, they need to pay for it themselves.

Athens, Barcelona, LA are in the northern hemisphere. I think 2016 being held in the southern hemisphere in their "winter" PLUS, indeed, the rather questionable condition of the natural coastal waters around Rio, puts the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center at risk -- in other words, there is legitimate worry that air-borne viruses from the coastal waters -- because of the time of year, and perhaps the prevailing wind conditions around Rio, could then land at the other water venues...where the athletes will be immersing themselves in the water. That is the reason for asking for a roof. I think FINA's worries are very legitimate. Obviously, the test events this summer have given them great concern for worries next year.

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Athens, Barcelona, LA are in the northern hemisphere. I think 2016 being held in the southern hemisphere in their "winter" PLUS, indeed, the rather questionable condition of the natural coastal waters around Rio, puts the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center at risk -- in other words, there is legitimate worry that air-borne viruses from the coastal waters -- because of the time of year, and perhaps the prevailing wind conditions around Rio, could then land at the other water venues...where the athletes will be immersing themselves in the water. That is the reason for asking for a roof. I think FINA's worries are very legitimate. Obviously, the test events this summer have given them great concern for worries next year.

Baron, 32 years old, carioca, never heard of any air-borne viruses that came from Rio coastal areas to the city. Even the water viruses that media is bringing over and over are disputable since nobody have ever got sick of any of them - not a single report from long long time...

FINA worries are legitimate in the case they didn't approve the venues when Rio presented the projects... With everything almost done, to come to the press and complain is something that smells political...

Plus: Winter in Rio...

Temperature reaches 38°C (101ºF) in Rio and winter has new heat record

http://g1.globo.com/rio-de-janeiro/noticia/2015/09/temperatura-chega-384-c-no-rio-e-inverno-tem-novo-recorde-de-calor.html

Yesterday in "deadly dangerous waters with flying aquatic viruses" of Ipanema Beach's winter...

fup20150916173.jpg

You guys have no idea about what you are talking about.

I think their biggest concern should be that there still isn't a venue decided upon for water polo.

That's really a concern and I'm amazed we are less than 1 year from the games and water polo have no venue... *facepalm*

Edited by DannyelBrazil
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Danny, I am giving FINA...who is OVERSEEING their sports -- not You, not I, not ROCOG -- the benefit of the doubt. You show how the natives are fine. Well, sure, if you are acclimated to local viruses, etc., etc., then you have built up an immunity to them. If you go to a new environment where you have NOT been exposed to any new organisms, you will surely develop allergies and resistance, et.,c to those.

FGS, Danny stop being so over-defensive of all the criticisms. It is just a sports federation seeking protection for the well-bring of their athletes who are coming into a new environment. That's all.

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Mr. Baron... ten years trying to make Rio and Brazil look like s...

It is pathetic to say locals are immune to the costal waters... if it was true every and each tourist would get sick in Copacabana. Every weekend there are thousands of People bathing there and other costal beaches.

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Mr. Baron... ten years trying to make Rio and Brazil look like s...

It is pathetic to say locals are immune to the costal waters... if it was true every and each tourist would get sick in Copacabana. Every weekend there are thousands of People bathing there and other costal beaches.

Well then, why is FINA so concerned? Don't tell me that a Federation that has hosted HUNDREDS of competitions ALL AROUND THE PLANET for over a century (it was founded in 1908) doesn't know what it's talking about? :blink: So we would take the word of unknown internet posters over the concerns of an established, international organization merely wanting to protect its athletes?? :blink: Uhmmm, I'd err on the side of the former.

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Well..the ones that will have the pleasure to come will find out the truth.

We can discuss about the bay waters, despite of everything Danny has been saying here over and over about how it depends on what part of the bay we are talking about... but Ive never seen anyone complaining about the open waters beaches.

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In response to FINA’s remarks, Rio de Janeiro’s mayor, Eduardo Paes, rejected the criticism, saying that FINA’s grievances were unwarranted and that Rio “has met all the demands” of the International Olympic Committee.

According to Paes’ response, FINA, as well as the IOC, “always knew” that the Maria Lenk venue would not have a roof, reiterating that Rio lacked the resources to add the structure. Paes also responded that the capacity of the venue was also “always known” to FINA, expressing, ““Our installations cannot be compared to those in Beijing. They won’t be as luxurious, they won’t be over the top, because that costs a lot of money and the city has to be careful with the money.”

Paes was, however, silent regarding the open water quality at Copacabana Beach and Guanabara Bay.

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Danny, I am giving FINA...who is OVERSEEING their sports -- not You, not I, not ROCOG -- the benefit of the doubt. You show how the natives are fine. Well, sure, if you are acclimated to local viruses, etc., etc., then you have built up an immunity to them. If you go to a new environment where you have NOT been exposed to any new organisms, you will surely develop allergies and resistance, et.,c to those.

FGS, Danny stop being so over-defensive of all the criticisms. It is just a sports federation seeking protection for the well-bring of their athletes who are coming into a new environment. That's all.

Baron, Rio receives more 2 million tourists (foreigners indeed) for the 15 days-span of Christmas-New Years holidays. We are talking of a number bigger than than athletes that are coming to Rio for the Olympics.

It's 2 million people - who are not cariocas - who are not immune to any new organisms only Rio beaches might have or any threat media and foreign people are inventing - pretty much it's the same as the risk of being killed by an Anaconda in Manaus during the World Cup. It's utterly crazy.

There is simply NO case reported of any person being contamined with viruses in Rio de Janeiro beaches - That's official, that's a trustable number.

FGS, stop calling me "over-defensive". I'm here to point the absurds of crazy foreigners trying to detract Rio de Janeiro and Brazil just because of sports politics.

Well..the ones that will have the pleasure to come will find out the truth.

We can discuss about the bay waters, despite of everything Danny has been saying here over and over about how it depends on what part of the bay we are talking about... but Ive never seen anyone complaining about the open waters beaches.

Not to mention, Rio hosts international triathlons and marathon swimming FOR YEARS!!! And nobody never got contamined by viruses!!!

Edited by DannyelBrazil
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Then why is FINA overly concerned? Don't tell me they're doing this just to embarrass Brazil and Rio.

Sports politics maybe? It was already said in Brazilian media that some blocks inside of the IOC is not happy with Nuzman's (Brazilian NOC and OCOG president) skyrocket projection.

Rio 2016 success can mean he will get more power inside the IOC...

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I feel like I'm in the minority, but I actually like having aquatic events held outside, at least once in a while. I feel that adjusting to competing both indoors and outdoors is, and should be, part of the challenge of competitive swimming, diving, water polo and synchro swimming. There has been recent world championships and Olympics held outdoors and, while it's perhaps not the ideal setting for world records and PBs, it remains fair. It can also create beautiful settings for TV.

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FINA medical committee says Copacabana water "safe" after Olympic Test event checks

The Sports Medicine Committee for swimming’s world governing body, FINA, has declared the waters of Copacabana beach in Rio “safe” for competitors after follow-up health checks on those who took part in last month’s Marathon Swimming Olympic Test Event.

The announcement appears to mark a change of stance for FINA, whose President Julio Maglione was reported to have sent a letter to Rio Mayor Eduardo Paes this week strongly criiticising the facilities and water quality at Olympic venues.

A total of 50 swimmers from 12 nations who took part in the event from August 22-23 were subject to tests implemented by the Sports Medical Committee and numerous National Federations.

riotestswimfinish.jpgAllan do Carmo of Brazil is first to touch the finish line at the course at Copacabana Beach during the Marathon Swimming Challenge - Aquece Rio Test Event for the Rio 2016 Olympics on August 22. After performing health checks on competitors for the next 26 days, FINA's Sports Mediciine Committee has said the water was "safe" ©Getty Images

Today’s statement from FINA says: “Up to date, 26 days after the conclusion of the event, there is no notice of any subsequent health issue on the athletes that competed in Rio, from the following countries: Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan and Netherlands.

“Consequently, the waters of the Copacabana beach were safe during the organisation of the Marathon Swimming test event.

“The FINA Sports Medicine Committee, in co-ordination with the IOC, Rio 2016 Organising Committee and INEA (Brazilian State Institute for the Environment), will continue conducting tests and monitoring the quality of the waters in Copacabana beach, in accordance with International Standards.”

This may prove bewildering news for the Rio Mayor who was this week in receipt of a letter from the President of FINA accusing the Rio 2016 authorities of showing FINA “disrespect” by providing substandard facilities and failing to act on warnings of the hazardously polluted nature of the Copacabana open air swimming venue and nearby open-air venues for diving, water polo and synchronised swimming

“The recent decisions of Mr Eduardo Paes are seriously damaging the image and value of FINA and its disciplines,” the letter stated, according to the AP.

http://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1030286/fina-medical-committee-says-copacabana-water-safe-after-olympic-test-event-checks

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I feel like I'm in the minority, but I actually like having aquatic events held outside, at least once in a while. I feel that adjusting to competing both indoors and outdoors is, and should be, part of the challenge of competitive swimming, diving, water polo and synchro swimming. There has been recent world championships and Olympics held outdoors and, while it's perhaps not the ideal setting for world records and PBs, it remains fair. It can also create beautiful settings for TV.

The thing with that though is that with the sun right above them, the sun is a blinding factor for the swimmers at a certain angle. Plus, from the broadcaster's POV, you cannot get that railing running across the length of the pool in order to get overhead shots. (Of course, they have drones now, but I think the broadcasters would prefer the more certain ceiling rails or placements that are more steady.

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Then why is FINA overly concerned? Don't tell me they're doing this just to embarrass Brazil and Rio.

This is what happens when hosts don't provide fantasy palaces for venues. A "small" aquatics center with only 12,500 seats instead of the 17,500 they got at London and with no roof sets a bad precedent for FINA. Future hosts may want to save money with a smaller aquatics center as well. So they respond to Rio downsizing the original plan for the venue by publicly criticizing them in any way they can.

http://www.usnews.com/news/sports/articles/2015/09/16/swimming-body-criticizes-rio-olympic-organizers

And this is why Agenda 2020 will probably fail. Because the IOC isn't the primary source driving the size of the games: the sporting federations are pushing for huge and expensive venues.

Edited by Nacre
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