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Time to raise the volume


arwebb

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I've just found this very interesting article -

Time to raise the volume

It is now fantastically, overwhelmingly, barn-stormingly obvious that the London 2012 Olympic bid needs a few more pied pipers. Well, just pipers; they don't have to be pied. Yesterday's parade of Olympic heroes through London was perfectly respectable, as was its culmination in Trafalgar Square, but bearing in mind the near-ecstasy of the England Rugby World Cup-winning team trawling these same streets 11 months ago, it lacked heart. And people.

Three-quarters of a million ...

...

http://www.sport.telegraph.co.uk/sport....rt.html

What do you think?

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A good article. The timing was poor for this event and it was never going to be as well attended as the Rugby World Cup parade because

a) The Rugby Parade was done straight after the event

B) Team sports are bigger in the UK. It's fundamentally a cultural thing - we like to see sports men and women winning for a team. Team GB is a team but it is really a group of individuals.

And human persusion is needed. A celebrity who can speak coherantly and passionatley on the behalf of the bid team for example. Its all very well getting sports men and women standing next to a flag with the logo on it but I'm sure many people would think "well they're athletes, of course they'd want an olympics here!"

Other than that I'm not sure what the bid team can do. The bid is already very high profile and everyone knows about it. Focusing the energy of those in Britain backing the bid so the IOC notices is going to be hard.

BUT, how do the other cities compare. Are they using their support, however big or small, effectively in their campaigns?

I'm not sure London is really behind in those terms.

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The reason why the parade was delayed was because the BOA wanted to involve our Paralympians as well as the Olympians, which I think is something to be applauded.

Yes, we can carp about the scheduling, but 200,000 people still showed up. Many more would have done if they could. That shows the passion for sport in this country.

I'd also like to know what the other bidding cities have done in this area.

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i would also add the parade for the england rugby team was better attended because this was the 1st major team event england had won since 1966 and also we beat the bloody aussies - always a nice feeling! :)
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  • 2 weeks later...

A very interesting article related to London's bid and its promotion

The sun shines down on a new world, a little like that belonging to the Teletubbies, where the fields are green and the sinuous bridges cross dancing pools of blue water. This is the vision of London's 2012 Olympic site. A La-La land which the bid leader, Sebastian Coe, is keen to bring to reality now the gloves for promoting London's credentials are (almost) off.

The stringent International Olympic Committee rules which forbid campaigning cities to make overt and dastardly forays at seducing those who will make the decision in July next year are relaxing next Tuesday. This does not immediately mean that IOC members can be collected en masse, taken to Buckingham Palace for canapés and charades, and presented with chunks of the Duchy of Cornwall. There are limits. But they are less limiting now...

The designers have been appropriately inspired by the human body. Some would say this part of east London already has been, but not necessarily by its most fragrant parts. It is these aspects of regeneration, of legacy, of technical competence upon which London is pinning many hopes.

"We're in good nick," Lord Coe said yesterday. "I was privately worried before Athens that Team GB would underperform and that the Games might be a disaster at a time when we were trying to bring to life the whole souflé of the bid. But the team punched their weight in front of 20,000 British fans, and the Games were a triumph. Now all the feedback I'm getting is that we have good momentum."

Paris, by comparison, does not have much "legacy" to hold up to scrutiny. They are throwing up the buildings in that inimitable French way and hauling them down again afterwards. The Stade de France will be a fixture, but it doesn't have muscles, or even tendons, of any description on its roof and that will surely hurt its chances. Analysts still rate the Parisian campaign most highly, but much will depend on the highly-charged run-in and that begins next week.

All the bidding cities must submit their official candidate file to the IOC next week. London's will be flown to Lausanne by British Airways on Monday and they had better not lose it in the baggage hold. If it turns up at LaGuardia Airport three days later there is no guarantee - despite the exhibited fondness between Blair and Bush - that the Americans will give it back. But if we assume it safely reaches its destination, and we are assured that will be the case, the IOC will receive a dramatic vision of show-jumping in Greenwich Park, archery at Lord's and that fabulous new muscle-bound stadium which will enter posterity as a permanent home for athletics. All within a total budget of (a projected) £2.3 billion.

The Greeks have just announced that the Athens Olympics cost them £4.89 billion, but then they had to build most of their stadiums from scratch. Britain can already boast Wimbledon, Horse Guards Parade and the Dome (although boast may not quite be the right word in that last case), so the building budget is appreciably lower.

However, as well as wooing the IOC, London could do with a domestic charm offensive. "I haven't been able to campaign openly until now," Lord Coe said. "But from next week you'll have to peel me off the stage."

London Mayor Ken Livingstone switches on a set of Olympic-themed lights in Oxford Street next Monday, but we probably need passion, visibility, celebrity, charisma and persuasion to glow alongside the light bulbs. We need figureheads to reach for our hearts and minds, even while Ken is filching the pocket. If, as has been reported, the coming of the Olympics will cost every London resident an extra £20 per year, that seems a pretty reasonable deal for a revamped community, efficient trains and schoolchildren in training for sport instead of a life on the sofa.

It is time to mount the two-pronged attack. At home and abroad. Us and the specific "them" of the IOC evaluation commission. They arrive for a four-day visit in February and it is then that all the stops must come popping out. "The only time the IOC come to town," explained a London 2012 spokesman.

They will ask questions on 17 different themes, from transport to catering. We must be ready. Whatever it takes: the Queen, boy bands, descendants of Lassie, anyone, anything that might do the trick. "We won't get away with a great PowerPoint and a couple of videos," is London's wise opinion.

Scarily, the commission will accept only one night of "entertaining". What form that entertainment may take is under discussion. What a responsibility. Not a French restaurant obviously, nor anything of dubious morality, like a Millwall match.

But otherwise the field is clear to stagger and overwhelm the commission with the cultural variety and glory of London.

Perhaps we could, to raise the domestic temperature a little, have a public vote. How would you like to see the 20-strong evaluation committee entertained? Bag of cockles in a Plaistow pub? Watching Arsenal in the Champions League (if they are still in it)? An illegal hunt round Hyde Park? All suggestions will be duly passed on.

It matters. London 2012 have submitted their designs, but the time to come off the drawing board is now.

somott09.jpg

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London banks on its historic heart

It's 9am on a sunny Saturday morning on 28 July 2012 and the sporting action at the London Olympics is due to begin with a spectacular women's triathlon starting and finishing at Hyde Park.

Thousands of people have made their way to central London for the two-hour race. With several major roads sealed off from traffic, they are enjoying a calm and relaxing walk to the venue.

The athletes are getting ready to dive into the Serpentine for the swimming stage before heading off on their bikes past London's famous landmarks including Buckingham Palace, the Mall and Trafalgar Square. The first medals of the Games will be decided after the race reaches its climax in a run through Hyde Park - another of London's key historic venues.

TV executives and organisers are relishing the prospect of showing off the capital's famous sights just a few hours after the Games of the 30th Olympiad have been opened with a glitzy ceremony and a firework display at the main stadium in east London's Stratford.

But while the main Olympic complex is based in the Lower Lea Valley, the sporting action will begin at the very heart of London.

The International Olympic Committee's new president, Thomas Bach of Germany, has given his chauffeur the morning off and walked across to Hyde Park to watch the action from the IOC's Dorchester Hotel on Park Lane.

The former Olympic fencer is joined on his stroll by Seb Coe, the chairman of the London Organising Committee ( LOCOG), and by Britain's newest IOC member Paula Radcliffe, the multi-lingual former marathon runner who is chatting to Bach in German as they make their way through the park.

Many IOC members have decided to slot the triathlon race into their schedule this morning because it is so close to the Dorchester. They have time to take in the race before popping back to the hotel for lunch and leaving for other events in the afternoon and evening.

Although Olympic leaders will have to make the journey across town to the athletics and swimming events at Stratford, they are looking forward to watching medals won just a short trip from both their hotel and London's best restaurants and theatres.

Beach volleyball at Horse Guards Parade and the cycling and marathon events around Westminster and the Mall are on the schedules of most IOC members and of the chief executives of Olympic sponsors.

The Americans, Cubans and Japanese members do not have far to go to watch their teams compete for baseball gold at Regent's Park. Although it is much further away, watching the equestrian events at Greenwich Park is popular because of the venue's historical significance.

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It's 9am on a pissy wet  Saturday morning on 28 July 2012 and the sporting action at the vastly over budget London Olympics is due to begin with a spectacular women's triathlon starting and finishing at Hyde Park.

Thousands of people have made their way to central London for the two-hour race. With several major roads sealed off from traffic thousands more are stuck there whether the like it or not.  They are mightily annoyed but due to restrictions in media reporting their anger will never be shown.  Some other spectators are enjoying a leisurely walk to the venue – although this is partly because the underground is so bloody awful .

The athletes have all received their inoculations and are getting ready to dive into the sess-pit like Serpentine for the swimming stage before heading off on their bikes past London's famous landmarks including Buckingham Palace, the Mall and Trafalgar Square. The added element of being able to unlock your bike from the railings is set to add even further tension and some comic highlights to the transition phase.  The first medals of the Games will be decided after the race reaches its climax in a run through Hyde Park - another of London's key historic venues.

TV executives and organisers are relishing the prospect of showing off the capital's famous sights just a few hours after the Games of the 30th Olympiad have been opened with a glitzy ceremony hosted by Ant and Dec.  The highlight had been a phone in competition to see who would light the famous Olympic Cauldron.  The eventual winner was a delighted Barbara Windsor, an aged ex-TV ‘star’ who hoped the publicity might give her another chance at fame.

But while the main Olympic complex is based in the Lower Lea Valley, the sporting action will begin at the very heart of Ye Olde London Town.

The International Olympic Committee's new president, Thomas Bach of Germany, has given his chauffeur the morning off and walked across to Hyde Park to watch the action from the IOC's Dorchester Hotel on Park Lane. He has been surrounded by half a dozen burly bodyguards as he does not wish to have to meet any normal plebes that attend the event.

The former Olympic fencer is joined on his stroll by Seb (I’m such a lime ball) Coe, the chairman of the London Organising Committee ( LOCOG), At the venue they hand their tickets to former Olympic athlete Paula Radcliffe.  Paula is filming a TV documentary on what happened to her after her running career disintegrated following the doping scandal in the run up to Beijing 2008.  Despite her protests the independent TV company filming the documentary thought it would be good publicity to have her close to the games.

It was thought that many IOC members would have decided to slot the triathlon race into their schedule this morning because it is so close to the Dorchester. They have instead jumped into their chauffer driven limo’s to take a look around Harrods before popping back to the hotel for lunch and an afternoon being pampered in the Spa.

Although Olympic leaders will have to make the journey across town to the athletics and swimming events at Stratford, they are looking forward to watching medals won just a short trip from both their hotel and London's best restaurants and theatres. Assuming of course they can be bothered.

In a bid to at least be seen viewing events Beach volleyball at Horse Guards Parade and the cycling and marathon events around Westminster and the Mall are on the schedules of most IOC members and of the chief executives of Olympic sponsors.  Beach volleyball in particular is high on the agenda for some of the male IOC members who are looking forward to the new rules imposing a thong-only clothing restriction on the male competitors.

The Americans, Cubans and Japanese members do not have far to go to watch their teams compete for baseball gold at Regent's Park. Although it is much further away, watching the equestrian events at Greenwich Park is popular because of the venue's historical significance.

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  • 3 weeks later...
I heard something on the radio today that a huge banner spread across a field near Heathrow Airport will advertise the release of the band aid single "Do they know it's christmas". This has got me thinking and I am wondering if it could be replaced by a London 2012 version when the band aid one is removed. When you think of how many hunreds of thousands of people fly into Heathrow daily it would be the best possible advertising.
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  • 2 weeks later...

London Olympics can be the first of a new generation

By Sebastian Coe  

(Filed: 20/12/2004)

We have come a long way since January when the London Olympic bid set out its stall to the International Olympic Committee, who then selected the five candidates for next year's vote.

For our whole team it has been an exciting and challenging year. Unusually in an election we have had the advantage of getting an interim report from our electorate in May. This report, and our close observations of the Athens Games, helped us to crystallise our proposals. We made changes, some significant, and we've created a blueprint for London 2012 that everyone in the United Kingdom can rally behind with pride.

The Athens Games were good for our bid. The great performances from our Olympic and Paralympic athletes, who in the last few weeks have scooped various end of year honours, and the tremendous support from UK fans who made the journey, underpinned our international sporting credibility.

Athens gave us the opportunity to gauge international reaction to our bid. We were also able to discuss with the IOC members the new direction the Games are going in and the thinking behind them. Their desire to see a more compact, affordable Games that diminishes over-indulgence in expenditure and leaves true and lasting legacies for the host city and their country. Our Games blueprint has been guided by this and support for our bid is growing. We are seen as serious, innovative and competent by international sport and commerce.

All this has been achieved in tandem and with wise counsel from our domestic governing bodies of sport. Our bid is building momentum throughout the country. I was in Scotland at the end of last week. In Edinburgh and Glasgow the mood has changed, as it has in our great regional cities who, after July's vote, are warming to attracting more events and creating new and better facilities in the lead-up to a London Games.

But I also recognise there are still those, albeit less significant in numbers and volume, including my good friend and fellow columnist Kate Hoey, who question the bid, who think we are not ready for the Games, who think we don't deserve to win. You will not be surprised. I fundamentally disagree.

Hosting the Games in London would be magnificent for sport. It is a virtuous circle. We need more sporting facilities in the UK, particularly in London that has fallen behind in the last 30 years. We will get them if we win.

We need sport to be higher up the political agenda. Seven years of planning the Games will also see that happen.

We need to be able to host more international events. With the new facilities that will be built for the Games we will be able to do this, in fact we are required to host test events prior to the Games.

We need better processes and systems to take athletes from playground to podium. The Institute of Sport, another crucial legacy of the Olympic Park, will see sports bodies together under one roof able to work to create the right environment to motivate and train our next generation of athletes and coaches.

We need more money invested in sport, particularly at a grassroots and club level. This can happen with both public and private sector funding if we win the Games. It would have been so much harder to mount a campaign without the huge generosity of our corporate partners.

Companies like EDF Energy, British Airways, BT, Virgin and Accenture, who all believe that sport is important, who believe we can land the prize and who look forward to long relationships with British sport as a result of their involvement in the last year.

We have hosted two successful Games in London, in 1908 and 1948. The latter when London came to the rescue of the Olympic movement at a time when they were the only city willing and able to host the Games.

Both were a landmark in the history of the movement. The 2012 Games in London can also be a landmark Games. I want them to be the first of a new generation. A Games that builds only what its city and country can sustain. Excellence without extravagance.

The extensive use of existing venues and facilities such as ExCeL, which will host six Olympic sports, and the Dome, will reduce the cost and complexity of hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 without compromising the quality of them.

The new Olympic Park already has planning permission and work has begun on two new 50-metre swimming pools and diving pool. This facility, and all the new build, will be accompanied by 25-year business plans that mix elite and community level sports.

This is the UK's fourth bid. We are serious. London is an ambitious city in an ambitious country. We must dare to win. Entering the last lap of a race is no time to blink.

We have the funding and planning in place. We are ready and able to deliver the best Olympic and Paralympic Games. London is ready and the country is ready.

This year we have achieved a great deal. Next year we must close the deal.

Daily Telegraph

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  • 4 weeks later...

London will advertise its 2012 Olympic bid at every Premier League football game for the rest of the season.

A link-up with the Premier League will see the bid promoted on advertising boards and in match programmes.

"Hosting the Olympics would be a tremendous event for the whole country, not just London," said England and Spurs defender Ledley King.

"I remember Euro '96 and what an impact that had. Imagine what it would be like and how the public would react."

Tottenham captain King and Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore helped London bid leader Lord Sebastian Coe launch the campaign at White Hart Lane.

"Our games are now screened in 195 countries with a global home reach of over 600 million," said Scudamore.

"People all over the world will realise the significance of us backing London 2012."

London's bid team will take the football competition around the United Kingdom if the city wins hosting rights for 2012 when the International Olympic Committee votes on 6 July.

"We plan to share the Olympic experience by holding the competition at venues such as Villa Park, Old Trafford, St James' Park, the Millennium Stadium and Hampden Park," said Lord Coe.

The England team have already backed London's bid, with captain David Beckham appearing in a special promotional film.

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New poster campaign unveiled by London 2012 bid committee.

buckingham_palace_horse.jpg

Buckingham Palace stars in latest 'Back the Bid' ad

Buckingham Palace is the latest iconic landmark to star in London 2012's high profile advertising campaign.

A new poster released today shows Athens gold medallist Leslie Law jumping over the Queen's official London residence on his horse Praire Monarch.

The advert will run on poster sites across central London, on the tube and on the city's famous red buses.

Equestrian star Law said that seeing the poster brought back memories of the Buckingham Palace reception where he belatedly received his Athens medal from Her Royal Highness the Princess Royal.

And he added that the whole country stood to benefit if London's bid was successful.

"Hosting the Games will be a boost for employment and for health," he said. "There will be tremendous benefits not just for London, but throughout the United Kingdom.

"I think [hosting] the Games in the United Kingdom would be a great investment in our kids and their future."

Law was awarded first place in the individual Equestrian three-day event after Germany's Bettina Hoy was penalised for inadvertently crossing the start line twice.

He received his medal at a special Buckingham Palace reception hosted by Her Majesty the Queen in October.

Other executions in the acclaimed advertising campaign show athletes performing with London landmarks including Nelson's Column, Tower Bridge, The Swiss Re 'Gherkin', the Thames Barrier and the London Eye.

The adverts urge Londoners to 'Make Britain Proud' by backing the campaign to bring the 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games to London.

14 January 2005

It's quite ironic really given the latest controversy over comments emanating from the Palace. Her Majesty better duck just in case the horse leaves more behind whilst jumping over the Palace then bargained for.

:laughlong:  :laughlong:  :laughlong:

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batterseaST190105_450x410.jpg

Battersea power station will be floodlit tonight with the 2012 Olympic bid logo to signify south London's support.

Olympic inspectors will arrive in the capital next month to assess the bid. A reception at Buckingham Palace is being planned alongside a trip to 10 Downing Street during the four-day visit.

Members of the 12-strong team will tour all 27 proposed Olympic venues including the new Wembley and Lord's.

Landmark buildings and open spaces, such as Horse Guards Parade, Hyde Park and Trafalgar Square will be decked out in London 2012 banners. Buses and Tubes will also carry logos in the biggest promotional campaign mounted by Transport for London.

One of the highlights will be a drive through the new Channel Tunnel link, which will be used to speed spectators between St Pancras and the proposed Olympic village in Stratford in seven minutes. The tunnel is complete but the tracks have yet to be laid. Delegatesare also likely to be shown how Stratford can be reached in 20 minutes by road from Hyde Park Corner - with traffic lights changing in their favour. The fact they are visiting during half-term, when traffic is light, should make this easier to achieve.

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To continue with this thread as the London promotions thread...

Official Reception Planned At Buckingham Palace For IOC Evaluation Commission

Posted 11:36 am ET (GamesBids.com)

An evening reception at Buckingham Palace is being planned when the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) evaluation commission visits London February 16-19 reports the London Evening Standard.

Under IOC rules London 2012 officials are only allowed to set up one social occasion away from inspection of the proposed venues.

Although details of the event have not been revealed by London 2012 officials because of confidentiality and final approval by the IOC, it is understood that officials are working with royal aides on a dinner-reception which would be more impressive than taking the commission members out for a night at a West End theatre or to a sporting event, reports the Standard.

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