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Ceremonies on UTube, Pt 2


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OK, it's finally here! Part 1 of the much fuller version of the Moscow 1980 Summer Olympics ceremonies is now here from Balanced Australia that he uploaded almost a couple of weeks ago, restored and enhanced in stereo and HD! This is largely taken apparently from Seven's live coverage from Moscow's Lenin Stadium--I still can't find out who called the event--though he says in the intro that there was also footage from Soviet TV's CT-CCCP to fill it in. He adds that 95% of the footage of the Games is here with 100% of the closing, so the opening is about as full as it gets from the live coverage. Would be interested to see what was missing. I wish he could've kept the beginning footage for the extended footage of the torch making its way from the Moscow City Hall. And was there an intro to this from Seven? You'll notice unlike the replay version from Russia's Channel One, things go further like an extended play of the Soviet anthem--the 1979 version--and the Tribute to the ancient Greeks. Tchaikovsky is all over this one from the countdown to the end of part one. Everything is done as if it was conducted in real Moscow time. And no inset circle shot of the flame. There will be multilingual subtitles in this at the bottom with one of the Moscow songs. You think the BBC would archive something like this since it's been known to do that. Maybe that will turn up later.

(Man, Moscow finally gets the full treatment and we're still patiently waiting for LA from four years later...)

Seoul 1988 Opening Ceremony highlights with Sweden's SVT commentary--part 1. With the usual European phone-sounding-like commentary via satelitte.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fWS9EM9YjA

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Good thing you clarified, I was about to say that there was no 1992 Winter Olympics and Paralympics Games in Albertville Minnesota United States of America North America.

The only Parade of Nation portion of the Beijing 2008 Opening Ceremony from the BBC's coverage apparently allowed to be uploaded on US-centric YouTube. This one's interesting because it reminds me of Seoul's because of the fact that, if you go by the English language translation from the amount of Chinese strokes, the Parade of Nations started with the letter G for the first few nations with the African nations, even with Greece starting it as it ALWAYS does. In addition, this BBC clip also explains, through Huw and Claire, the story how the Scottish bagpipers wound up playing in the Opening Ceremonies at the Bird's Nest, which I liked. Did seem out of place in Beijing a bit though.

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^^ It was a representation of world music. Better than using pop and Eurotrash like Torino 2006 but it all ended up being too repetitive.

They should have been cycling through various bits of world music, preferably playing traditional, classical and even modern pieces. No piece would ever be repeated during the whole parade of nations.

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^^ It was a representation of world music. Better than using pop and Eurotrash like Torino 2006 but it all ended up being too repetitive.

They should have been cycling through various bits of world music, preferably playing traditional, classical and even modern pieces. No piece would ever be repeated during the whole parade of nations.

There are copyright issues involved in the choice of music. It's covered in Chapter 9 of my book.

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^^ So Torino got approval to play such music? Or is it with regards to the use of classical pieces? Personally, if I was to organize the music during the Torino parade, I would have tried to get Gigi D'Agostino to do some DJ'ing even if it would seem like copying Athens 2004.

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I liked the music used from 1984-2000, whether is was played by an orchestra, a marching band or a cd player. The music from 2004 and 2008 was fine as music (I do have CDs of both), but it just seemed out of place when used as background music for the parade.

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I would have prefered some original music for the parade of nations in Beijing. A soundtrack style combination of orchestral music with Chinese themes.

If you watch the 2008 Paralympics opening ceremony, they actually had original music for the parade of nations, which was FAR better than the ones used in the Olympics one (i know they tried to do a representation of world music but it became too repetitive since they only used like 6 or 7 tracks)

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I would have prefered some original music for the parade of nations in Beijing. A soundtrack style combination of orchestral music with Chinese themes.

I would have done a 5 continental "orchestra" type deal, alongside the traditional/Modern Beijing Orchestra/Symphony.

You have them in the colours of the Olympic rings, in their respective groups, with traditional and modern instruments from the region.

For example you have:

Europe, with instruments like violins, cellos, pianos, accordions, pipes etc.

America, with banjos, electric guitars, saxophones, trumpets etc.

Africa, with traditional African instruments.

Asia, with traditional Asian instruments.

Oceania, with their traditional instruments.

Well you get the idea. Perhaps for a future Olympics (I expect London to do it's own music or just use Eurotrash. :P)

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Or a small piece of music from each participating country as they march in

I think the problem with that is when they have done it in the past, only the 'major' countries get highlighted.

In the last 20 years or so that I have been following Olympic ceremonies, music that stands out:

I loved the Albertville music for the athletes entry, Barcelona was good and very emotional when the Spanish team entered, Lillehammer was nice but too much drumming in between the various musical pieces and sometimes practically silence, it would have been better if it had been more consistant. Atlanta was terrible, an Olympic anthems mix tape. Sydney could have been better, something like the 'Eternity' segment would have been good for the athletes entrance.

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As someone who enjoys Yanni, Jarre, and John Williams, I disagree with your assessment of Atlanta. Otherwise I concur with you on Albertville, Barcelona, and Lillehammer. The collection of Japanese folk songs used in Nagano was rather neat as well.

BTW the music for the Spanish entry in Barcelona was titled "Espana", sadly I have not found a recording of it elsewhere. Which was probably a good thing as my wife and I got married the weekend after the Barcelona Games and every piece in our ceremony had an Olympic connection of some sort and I would have probably tried to stick that one in at the last minute.

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Sydney's Olympics was undoubtably the most ambitious project in Australian TV history, and probrably still is, for the Seven Network. Yes, I still have the 2-DVD set from that with very Australian coverage from Seven! Haven't watched it in a few years though.

Flash back further to 20 years earlier to when Seven first did the Olympics by itself under a then-Australian record of A$1 million, a lot of money back then, when it broadcast the Moscow Olympics under a cloud of political and sports uncertainty that was just resolved for Australia in this case. For the first time for perhaps many worldwide thanks to Balanced Australia, we are seeing the Moscow Olympics Parade of Nations more in full instead of fleeting bits and pieces and live that was televised late at Saturday night with the Australian broadcast from Seven that started at 1 or 2 am and ended somewhere between 3-4 am AEST Sunday with a very likely reairing. All remastered and in HD. I myself never saw the Parade of Nations in full from Moscow, so this is a eagerly-anticipated treat, as those Games are intriguing to me. Notice in the first video I showed how blank-faced everyone, especially those women on the chariots and parading, were in the Tribute To Ancient Greece laying flower petals on the track to welcome the athletes and officials marching with. Apparently, this must be the host Soviet TV feed because notice, starting with the Australians (the first ones to march alphabetically after creators Greece in the Russian language in the 81-nation boycott-depleted field) and the British (with only Team Manager Dick Palmer solely marching on the track with British Olympic team opting not to in a token boycott), you don't see tights shots of the Olympic flags used in protest becuase the Soviets apparently were disgusted by that over the protests of its Red Army Afghanistan invasion. Because it went to a commercial break, we do not get to see Burma, Benin, Belgium, and Afghanistan--though we do get to see Benin, Afghanistan, and Burma marching on the track far away as we can see from distant camera shot and from their flags. So we're robbed of witnessing the reception of what the Afghans had. Maybe we'll eventually see the fuller one, perhaps from the BBC. From the official Moscow Olympics film, we do see those nations marching. It was a lot formal in dress with suits and ties than it is now--see the Aussies in green and gold blazers, in this case

Like with Athens 24 years later, Russian and Greek are related in terms of its language, so you notice Venezuela and Vietnam (back since 1972 as South Vietnam and reunified) as Benezuela and Bietnam). It ends just as Denmark enters Lenin Stadium. Would like to know who were the Seven commentators on this and the closing ceremonies. This OC was the third-last one to end fully in broad daylight before LA and Seoul--though in Los Angeles' case it was dusk when it ended. If you listen very closely, you can hear very faintly the Seven announcers obscured in favor of the Soviet Lenin Stadium PA and Channel One (Russian Federation era) narrators mixed in.

Oh yeah, this must be the last time a national anthem went as long as it did in the Opening Ceremony at the beginning in terms of stanzas. We should be very thankful it wasn't the case with Athens when the Greek anthem lasts as long as 147 stanzas! The IOC must have put a stop to that, given how long these ceremonies became since.

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Just before Seven's second commercial break you may saw the Andorrans, who marched under the Olympic flag, entering the stadium with their sign in front, so that, technically, was another nation omitted along with the others. You know it's dated from the 1970s and 1980s when you see an inset circle on the screen of the torch relay's progression to Lenin Stadium.

I can only assume that the IOC has the more complete footage of the Moscow OC if not Channel One Russia, the BBC, SVT, YLE, NOS, DR, France Televisions, among others. Balanced Australia could look there if he wants. Remains to be seen if somebody else will upload the missing footage.

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While we await the third installment of the Moscow 1980 Olympic Opening Ceremonies from Balanced Australia, I want to bring up the news reports and highlights from French TV, both from Benoit Sadeau on Antenna 1 and Ladislas de Hoyos from TF1, on the Closing Ceremony. Here, like with the Opening Ceremony, it appears it was all in one feed from Soviet TV transmitted worldwide with nobody else bothering to bring in their own TV cameras. Inevitably, Soviet TV couldn't escape the Olympic flag presence in the flag bearer march this time. Not even in the tight shots. And the Los Angeles flag in place of the stars and stripes. Also with highlights from the Games.

Footage from the Opening Ceremony with the Friendship of the Peoples, the kid Mishas, and the acrobats/gymnasts

Another thing you notice from the Seven Network's live broadcast, which was taken from Soviet TV, was there was no Olympic TV graphics that we later got and now get taken for granted on the screen IDing people, events, and venues. Plus, history was made when the Aussies had two flagbearers sharing the Olympic flag in swimmer Max Metzger and sprinter Denise Boyd, only the united Korean team can say that 20 years later in Sydney with basketball player Jeong Eun Sun and North Korean team official Pak Jun Chul.

Because of the boycott, I don't think many Americans and Canadians ever had a chance to see both ceremonies in full on TV or online; it would've been very interesting if NBC covered it like it would've been allowed to, graphics and all. Outside of Puerto Rico, which did go to Moscow and televised on Telemundo, I would wager if anybody was living very close to the US-Mexican border at the time might of caught it if you were living in San Diego/Chula Vista, El Paso, LA(?), and in the Rio Grande Valley for you could get Televisa's coverage from Mexico, which did go too. I think that would be interesting. I would also like to know how the Canadians might have got coverage of the Moscow Olympics during that time too, if at all. The BBC?

Actually, Belgium did NOT march at all in the Opening Ceremonies along with San Marino, The Netherlands, France, Italy, Switzerland, and Luxembourg. as stated by Wikipedia.

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I'm surprised to see the BOA rep got any camera time at all. I remember seeing a news photograph showing a cameraman facing the crowd with his back turned towards the track as the flag went by the camera's position.

When i think of 1980, I think of really big flags. They look like you could pole vault with them.

A final note. Thanks to the boycott in 1980, Sochi 2014 will likely outnumber Moscow in terms of number of participating nations.

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Not a ceremonies video, but interesting find.

Some interesting tidbits.

Far different from their 1994 bid, Anchorage 1992 proposed a purpose built Speed Skating Oval, outdoors in design, looking much like a conventional octagonal/rectangular field fitting major football stadium design.

They offered a temporary ceremonies venue like Lake Placid's amphitheater design, but at a far greater 50,000 people capacity.

There's an existing cross country venue, but it was proposed to build a new course next to it.

The athlete's village was offered at the University of Alaska. Edited by Lord David
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