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Patriot Hearts: Inside the Olympics that Changed a Country


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I see the book is listed on the Canadian Amazon now:

http://www.amazon.ca/Patriot-Hearts-Olympics-Changed-Country/dp/1553657942/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1296872863&sr=1-1

It's going for $20.65

Anybody planning to get the book?

It could be a very interesting read. I think I'm going to add it to my Olympic book library. I already got all the other Vancouver 2010 books so this will make a great addition.

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Isn't that a bit of an exaggeration? :blink:

How did Vancouver 2010 'change a country'? I mean was Canada so divided & broken up (say, in the way Iraq and other countries is/are) that it acted as such a catalyst? :rolleyes: Other than finally winning a ton of medals, wasn't it really just another big sportsfest at, to use a pun, heart?

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  • 3 months later...

Picked-up the book today at Costco for $20 (actually $19.99 + HST). Currently reading another book, but will be reading this one next. Should be interesting.

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I read it on my iPad the week it came out. :)

It's pretty good. Furlong spends a lot of time kissing David Atkins' butt--kind of embarassing, really. He doesn't really go into any of the major tensions between his executive team members (a bit between him and Terry).

I would call it interesting more than captivating.

What I would call crappy is that Vanoc staff received multiple emails encouraging them to buy the book (at a discount)...but never got an email that week to tell them their part two bonuses weren't coming. They found out in the media. Classy Furlong, really classy. :(

As for changing the nation, these Games did for a lot of people. The efforts Furlong's team made to bring every region of the country into the experience--starting with Ilanaaq, continuing with the BRILLIANT torch relay, and continuing through the official Canadian broadcaster's efforts to find how the rest of the country was experiencing the Games.

Team Canada's medallists surprised many in Québec with their bilingual skills--from places like Saskatchewan and Alberta with only small francophone minority communities.

But it was THE Game and THE Goal that really cemented the deal. I don't know how many countries have their identity wrapped up in a single sport the way we Canadians do with hockey...but really the entire 28 Feb 2010 was like a massive concurrent orgasm of 35 million people.

But here's my favourite story: I have a colleague who came to Canada from Israel: he's Palestinian. Like a lot of folks he's appreciated Canada for its safety, security, strong schools, strong healthcare for his kids. But he never really followed sport-before or since he got here. But over the 17 days he got pulled in. And in. And further in. So on the afternoon of 28 February 2010 his 2 sons sat in amazement as their Dad shrieked and jumped up and down cried.

"I've never felt so...Canadian in my entire life" he told me. And yes, we were both crying.

Universal experience? Of course not. But not an uncommon one either.

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  • 3 months later...

Finally read the book. It's a decent read. Brought back plenty of memories from the run-up to the games. My only gripe was that it could've had a little more coverage of the Paralympics. A good behind-the-scenes look at Vancouver 2010.

At the beginning of chapter 7, John Furlong mentions the book "How You Play the Gaame" by Calgary '88 CEO Frank King. I'm interested in reading this one and hopefully I can find it here somewhere in Calgary at a used bookstore.

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