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Dallas 2020


Sir Rols

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Medal ceremonies for the Summer Games are held at the venue immediately after the event. Only the Winter Games has special nightly events.

I think they would need to build a minimum 86,000 seater track stadium, though - don't think either stadium has the right configuration and size for a 400m track.

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Medal ceremonies for the Summer Games are held at the venue immediately after the event. Only the Winter Games has special nightly events.

I think they would need to build a minimum 86,000 seater track stadium, though - don't think either stadium has the right configuration and size for a 400m track.

Neither stadium does. It's one of the issues of any USA Bid....where to place track and field.

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Surely you can remove several rows of seating at the Cotton Bowl Stadium, make it an all individual seater, do some other improvements and come up with a 70,000 seater or so for Athletics?

Recent renovations say that's not really possible. The only options at this point would be to add an extra 50,000 seats to University of Texas-Arlington's Mavericks Stadium (currently holds 15,000) or make the University of North Texas keep Fouts Field (which has a track) and expand it to an extra 40,000 seats (it currently holds 30,000). The new stadium for the University of North Texas won't have a track around it. Fouts Field plans on being torn down, but if its not going to be torn down, it's seating will greatly be reduced and it becomes a track and field only stadium. Doing both would cost a lot money.

To me Dallas is better off being a part of a United States World Cup bid. This way they can use Cowboys Stadium and make the conversion from a football field to a soccer pitch without costing a lot of money. Also, the venue can be used long after another USA World Cup.

Plus a 70,000 seat track and field stadium somewhere in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex would be a huge waste if its not used after the games.

It's a major issue that the bid committee has to deal with: where in the world would track and field be held? Some say Swimming too, but Jerry Jones has said that Swimming could be held in his stadium. That would solve where to place the swimming events.

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It is rather ironic that a sport that has produced 738 medals for the United States (roughly 1/3rd of the USA's total medals) is the sport that most handicaps US bids. It is actually a great shame the US doesn't have a great facility for Athletics because American athletes deserve the chance to compete in front of a home crowd. It is sad that the USA has never hosted the World Championships. But with the US (like England for that matter) having so many world class football-code stadiums and with American fans being partial to being close to the action it is hard to get a track into a stadium.

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It is rather ironic that a sport that has produced 738 medals for the United States (roughly 1/3rd of the USA's total medals) is the sport that most handicaps US bids. It is actually a great shame the US doesn't have a great facility for Athletics because American athletes deserve the chance to compete in front of a home crowd. It is sad that the USA has never hosted the World Championships. But with the US (like England for that matter) having so many world class football-code stadiums and with American fans being partial to being close to the action it is hard to get a track into a stadium.

They have a stadium in Eugene, Oregon (known as Track City USA) but its not big enough to ever host the World Championships. It holds like 15,000 people.

Even the largest track stadiums in the United States aren't ever going to host the World Championships. Those happen to be football stadiums with a track in it.

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Another thing about the lack of major track and field facilities in the United States....

As soon as the Olympics are over, the Olympic Stadium would be converted to a facility for one of the local pro sports teams, thereby removing the track. Much like what happened to Atlanta's Olympic Stadium.

Let's say San Francisco wins as host city for a future Olympics. The San Francisco Olympic Stadium would be converted into a new stadium for the 49ers, who want a new stadium badly. They would reduce seating and remove the track. In San Diego, the Olympic Stadium becomes a new stadium for the Chargers. It's not ever going to happen, but in Oakland, the Olympic Stadium would either be the new home of the Raiders or Athletics.

It's one of the reasons that the United States has never hosted a World Championships in Track and Field.

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But that is an issue for almost every city that has bid for or hosted the Olympics. Since 1968, only Moscow, Los Angeles and Athens had pre-existing athletics stadiums. Barcelona underwent major expansion. And Rio will be adding seats to the existing athletics stadium. All others were built specifically for use as an Olympic venue (or as part of their bid, like the Seoul stadium).

Hmmm, interesting question above, though. If the USA were to bid for the IAAF World Championships in Athletics, looks like Los Angeles would be the top choice. Or has Memorial been converted to be football only? Maybe Husky Stadium in Seattle? I think it has a track. Most other large stadia in the USA seem to be football specific. The IAAFs have only been in North America once...Edmonton, Alberta in 2001.

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But that is an issue for almost every city that has bid for or hosted the Olympics. Since 1968, only Moscow, Los Angeles and Athens had pre-existing athletics stadiums. Barcelona underwent major expansion. And Rio will be adding seats to the existing athletics stadium. All others were built specifically for use as an Olympic venue (or as part of their bid, like the Seoul stadium).

Hmmm, interesting question above, though. If the USA were to bid for the IAAF World Championships in Athletics, looks like Los Angeles would be the top choice. Or has Memorial been converted to be football only? Maybe Husky Stadium in Seattle? I think it has a track. Most other large stadia in the USA seem to be football specific. The IAAFs have only been in North America once...Edmonton, Alberta in 2001.

The L.A. Coliseum retains the option of adding a running track. Husky Stadium is set to undergo a major renovation that will remove the track. The past 20 years have seen several major college football stadiums remove their running tracks in favor of more seating which equates more revenue. Darrell Royal Stadium in Austin and Ohio Stadium in Columbus are among the largest stadiums to remove their tracks.

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The L.A. Coliseum retains the option of adding a running track.

They do...but they would only do it for an Olympics...not an IAAF Championships. I mean, even its main tenant, USC, cannot use LA Memorial for its track events. They just use their existing track, Cromwell Field, in the campus. It would be a major undertaking for LA Memorial to put in a track again. They would have to raise the pitch 11 feet again which they took out in 1995 to make the football field closer to new seats.

If the IAAF weren't so fussy about its 55,000 seat requirement for its World Championships, the US could easily host in some university campus.

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It's a major issue that the bid committee has to deal with: where in the world would track and field be held? Some say Swimming too, but Jerry Jones has said that Swimming could be held in his stadium. That would solve where to place the swimming events.

Well one could sacrifice Cowboys Stadium into two arenas much like what Atlanta did with Georgia Dome and make it a split arena type deal where one side hosts an indoor based team sport (for example: Handball), whilst the other side hosts the main 50 meter swimming pool (a separate temporary diving/swimming pool could be built nearby to support Aquatics events or be built elsewhere).

But of course, this would simply be seen as copying Atlanta's concept or admitting that there's a lack of suitable indoor arenas or the unwillingness to build temporary ones.

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Interesting. Although we are side tracking this conversation (no pun intended), there must be at least existing one stadium in the USA that could host an IAAF event..right?

The United States hosts two IAAF Diamond League Events, in New York and Eugene, Oregon. They also host the Penn Relays in Philly. Those though are the only significant IAAF events in the United States.

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The United States hosts two IAAF Diamond League Events, in New York and Eugene, Oregon. They also host the Penn Relays in Philly. Those though are the only significant IAAF events in the United States.

Eugene is obviously NOT in a major cosmopolitan setting that the IAAF wants; and the one in New York is in some out of the way island in the Bronx where the subway does NOT reach. The New York 2012 campaign couldn't even use it as a credible vnue because of its difficult accessibility.

The IAAF is so picky that I think USA Track & Field just doesn't want to bother to cater to their prima donna wants. Just pick up the medals and go.

Stanford made a run for it once; but they picked another city because Stanford was only in Palo Alto. :rolleyes:

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The new Dallas Cowboys Stadium would be used for the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the medal round in soccer. The Cotton Bowl would probably be used for Soccer preliminaries and probably hosting the medal round in Women's Soccer.

The venues would be like this:

Dallas Cowboys Stadium- Opening and closing ceremonies. Also possibly for medal round in soccer. Also possible for medal ceremonies. Jerry Jones has stated his stadium could host swimming.

TThe main problem with the new cowboys stadium, regardless of anything else, is that it's actually NOT even in Dallas. It's 20 miles away in the suburb of Arlington. The Olympic Charter states that the opening & closing ceremonies be held IN the host ciy. So unless there are plans to move the stadium, any future "Dallas" bid would be greatly hindered.

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TThe main problem with the new cowboys stadium, regardless of anything else, is that it's actually NOT even in Dallas. It's 20 miles away in the suburb of Arlington. The Olympic Charter states that the opening & closing ceremonies be held IN the host ciy. So unless there are plans to move the stadium, any future "Dallas" bid would be greatly hindered.

Obviously, they would have to incorporate Arlington into the City of Dallas.

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TThe main problem with the new cowboys stadium, regardless of anything else, is that it's actually NOT even in Dallas. It's 20 miles away in the suburb of Arlington. The Olympic Charter states that the opening & closing ceremonies be held IN the host ciy. So unless there are plans to move the stadium, any future "Dallas" bid would be greatly hindered.

Any major sporting event in Dallas usually contains the entire metro area. Dallas never bids by itself. They always bid with the surrounding metro area.

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the one in New York is in some out of the way island in the Bronx where the subway does NOT reach. The New York 2012 campaign couldn't even use it as a credible vnue because of its difficult accessibility.

You've been corrected on this before....it's NOT IN THE BRONX, it's on Randalls Island between Manhattan and the north western portion of Queens, in the East River.

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Any major sporting event in Dallas usually contains the entire metro area. Dallas never bids by itself. They always bid with the surrounding metro area.

Of course. Any city that bids or has hosted the Games has done so in a regional effort. What I'm talking about though, is the *Olympic Charter*. In other words the IOC's "rules & regulations" handbook.

Which again stipulates that the MAIN Olympic Stadium (which also hosts the pinnacle event of the Olympics; the opening & closing ceremonies) "must be located in the 'host' city" ([any OTHER events that need to placed in other outlying areas could be done so. It was done with Atlanta & it's suburbs]). And Arlington does not fall into this criteria, unless of course the bid is called "Arlington" 20XX. <_<

This was the major drawback of "San Francisco's" 2012 bid, which proposed the stadium in Palo Alto (some 30 miles away from the actual city of San Francisco).

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oh good god....

Dallas has history, culture, art, lifestyle, cuisine, architecture, neighborhoods, sports, nature, recreation, religion, diversity, shopping, society etc etc etc all on par with most "glamor" capitols.

Lawl. No.

Any city can claim to have all of the things you mentioned but when it comes to stacking up against prominent cities like Paris, London, LA, New York etc Dallas is in a completely different league. It's all relative.

@FYI, Sydney's Olympic Stadium is in the City of Parramatta. I'm not sure how strictly the IOC applies this rule. Different countries have differing levels of government and borders. The London Olympic Stadium isn't in the City of London...

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I'll probably get flamed from my fellow Texans for saying this but after the problems at the Super Bowl, I don't see them being able to handle an Olympics. Don't get me wrong, I have lived in the Dallas/Ft Worth area before and I do think it's a great area to live in, but I just don't see the Olympics happening there for the reasons mentioned earlier.

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@FYI, Sydney's Olympic Stadium is in the City of Parramatta. I'm not sure how strictly the IOC applies this rule. Different countries have differing levels of government and borders. The London Olympic Stadium isn't in the City of London...

Well, the "City of London" is bascially just the "Downtown" portion of London, which consist of just 10,000 residents. It's like "Manhattan" in New York, but New York also consists of other Boroughs like Queens, the Bronx, Staten Island & Brooklyn. Rarely are the Olympic Stadiums located in the "Downtown" areas of host cities since it's too complicated & congested.

Although, London's stadium is still gonna be in the 'London Borough' of Stratford, only 6 miles from Downtown London. Looks like the same applied for Sydney; Auburn is only 8 miles from downtown Sydney (but like you said, your definitions over there may differ). And for Chicago's 2016 bid, the stadium was planned in the area of Washington Park, just 6 miles south from Downtown, but it was still within the city limits of Chicago.

But in the case of Dallas; Arlington is at least 20 miles from downtown & is "officially" another city. The same applied when San Francisco tried it for 2012 with "Palo Alto", which is 30 miles from downtown San Francisco & Palo Alto is also officially another city. It's not so much the semantics, but the main detriment in the Dallas & San Francisco 2012 case is the distance. 20-30 miles away vs. just 6-8 in London's & Sydney's case is a huge hurdle to any bid & represents a sense of pseudonym to the host city name. Even the NFL didn't advertise the Superbowl as 'Dallas' 2011, but rather "North Texas" cuz the stadium is actually located in Arlington & not Dallas.

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