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Dallas 2020


Sir Rols

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From Super Bowl To Summer Games?

Even as the Dallas area bursts its buttons, hosting the Super Bowl for the first time in Jerry Jones' new American coliseum, the city has developed an even greater itch it wants to scratch.

OK, here we go again.

The International Olympic Committee has dismissively rejected New York City and Chicago in recent Olympic competitions, and soccer's organization, FIFA, chose little Qatar over the U.S. for the 2022 World Cup. But Dallas is growing ever more determined to declare its candidacy for the 2020 games.

Is that masochistic? Are we just the giant sugar daddy nobody in sports loves? When the vote is taken in 2013, will Dallas even have a chance against such other presumed contenders as old world classics like Rome and Madrid; or Istanbul — especially now that Turkey is sort of the "it" country; or Dubai, the luxurious Oz of the Persian Gulf?

The fact is that the IOC's Europhile members prefer to take our musty television money but give the glamorous games themselves to somebody else. While the U.S. has four times hosted the Summer Olympics, on three of those occasions — St. Louis in 1904 and Los Angeles in '32 and '84 — no foreign city bid. The IOC just had to hold its nose and let its precious show go to America. Then, when Atlanta did win in 1996, foreigners found it by far the most unattractive of all modern Olympics.

Poor Salt Lake City won the 2002 Winter Games and then was caught up in a scandal that embarrassed the IOC. Never mind that Olympic corruption was endemic, and Salt Lake City just happened to get caught in a rare moment of Olympic honesty.

For all that Dallas has going for it — a vibrantly growing city, the nation's fourth-largest metropolitan area, one that is already jam-packed with existing stadium and arena facilities — and given the fact that Asia, Europe and South America all will have held the Summer Games in the 21st century and it's sort of North America's turn, Dallas has to fight not only the bias against the United States and the ugly memory of Atlanta's so-called T-shirt Games and the fact that our U.S. Olympic Committee has been both a dope and a patsy, but its own disastrously torrid summer climate. To hold the Olympics in the relatively milder period around the beginning of June, Dallas would need a dispensation from the IOC, which lists a weather window from July 15 to August 31.

So, Dallas has so much to overcome in what seems almost a quixotic quest to try to make the United States a sports destination again. Well, anyway, we can be grateful that one of our cities hasn't given up the ghost — and if the woebegone Cowboys can't be America's team anymore, at least Dallas can be our last forlorn hope, America's dream.

NPR

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I live in Dallas and logistically it would be a nightmare.

...sort of like every city that proposes the games, and takes on a process of sorting out a plan to address these and other specific and challenging issues.

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I'm beginning to wonder if this has something to do with Jerry Jones. Super Bowl, NCAA Final Four, NBA All-Star Game. Does Jerry secretly want to bring an Olympics to Big D? I wouldn't rule it out.

I do agree with the poster that mentioned the logistics would be a nightmare.

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who shot the J.R at the Dallas series? may be they can clear it at the opening ceremony...

Hey Fatih, it was just announced that J.R., Linda Crystal and Patrick Duffy will all be back for another Dallas reunion. Maybe the first act will be putting together a domestic bid and buying out the USOC. Then Act 2 will be the fight to Lausanne for 2020?? Who knows??

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Last year for the NBA All Star Game we had a foot of snow, this year for the Super Bowl we're in the midst of an ice storm. Considering the pattern of weather we've had for major sports events, we might prefer bidding for Winter Olympics. :P

But in all sincerity, this bid is not going anywhere.

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And speaking of morons.. whatever happened to the ones from Tulsa. They've been quite lately. Did they finally get the big, swift kick in the a$s back to reality. :lol:

Never fails that every time a city hosts something big like the Superbowl, national conventions or whatever, somehow there always seems to be some d!ckweed that thinks the Olympics is the "next-step". I wonder which one is gonna crawl out of the woodwork next year when the Superbowl is held in Indianapolis. :rolleyes:

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And speaking of morons.. whatever happened to the ones from Tulsa. They've been quite lately. Did they finally get the big, swift kick in the a$s back to reality. :lol:

Never fails that every time a city hosts something big like the Superbowl, national conventions or whatever, somehow there always seems to be some d!ckweed that thinks the Olympics is the "next-step". I wonder which one is gonna crawl out of the woodwork next year when the Superbowl is held in Indianapolis. :rolleyes:

I have no problems with cities thinking they can host the Olympics, so long as you have the infrastructure to host them. Indy could possibly while Tulsa clearly does not. Under your way of thinking, Atlanta shouldn't have even thought about bidding for the Games in the late 1980's, especially after hosting the DNC in 1988. Someone has to host the Games and one city is just as good as the other at the end of the day. I went to the 1996 Games and thought it was great (except the bombing which could have happened anywhere) dispite what the international feeling was.

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^The IOC though, sure didn't think much of the Atlanta Games. It left them with a bitter aftertaste.

The Olympic Games are MAMMOTH nowadays. And simply because an anamoly of one smaller league city that hosted the Games some 15 years ago doesn't automatically dictate that "someone has to host the Games & that one city is just as good as the other at the end of the day". It doesn't work that way & it's not that simplistic & black & white.

Even the USOC said NO to larger cities like Houston & Philadelphia in the last 2 Olympic races because they didn't meet the standards. So Indianapolis by no means could deal with it. If the IOC had some reservations about Chicago's transportation network in the 2016 Bid Evaluation Process, there's no way a much smaller city like Indianapolis could provide an adequate plan that would suffice the IOC.

It's not just about having some fancy, new stadium (like Lucas Oil) that could get you the Olympic Games. A city ALSO has to have the logistics, infrastructute, total local government backing & a large number of accommadations that smaller cities like Indianapolis just don't have. It's not "my way of thinking". It's just how it is.

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^The IOC though, sure didn't think much of the Atlanta Games. It left them with a bitter aftertaste.

The Olympic Games are MAMMOTH nowadays. And simply because an anamoly of one smaller league city that hosted the Games some 15 years ago doesn't automatically dictate that "someone has to host the Games & that one city is just as good as the other at the end of the day". It doesn't work that way & it's not that simplistic & black & white.

Even the USOC said NO to larger cities like Houston & Philadelphia in the last 2 Olympic races because they didn't meet the standards. So Indianapolis by no means could deal with it. If the IOC had some reservations about Chicago's transportation network in the 2016 Bid Evaluation Process, there's no way a much smaller city like Indianapolis could provide an adequate plan that would suffice the IOC.

It's not just about having some fancy, new stadium (like Lucas Oil) that could get you the Olympic Games. A city ALSO has to have the logistics, infrastructute, total local government backing & a large number of accommadations that smaller cities like Indianapolis just don't have. It's not "my way of thinking". It's just how it is.

Outside of the bombing, I just don't see what the IOC didn't like about the 96 Games. They didn't like all of the Coca-Cola signs, and Budweiser signs. Well it's basically impossible for the Olympics to make money without all of the corporate support unless you're like China and don't mind having the government lose tens of billions of dollars of the event. And I don't see how London is going to be some great host. When I think of London I think of mostly dreary overcast skies and old buildings with narrow streets. That doesn't seem anything all that special.

Also, there is all of this talk about the Games having to be in cosmopolitan cities. When I think of that I think of cities with a lot of different cultures. But if I travel to France, I want to try French cuisine, and other things France. I don't want German food in France. You don't go to Beijing to eat a hamburger or a bratwurst...you want to try Chinese food and see Chinese culture. That's just me though. The IOC's thinking seems to be very flawed.

And by the way are the "Olympic Standards"? The IOC might need to make this clearer.

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I don't think that the IOC didn't like the sponsors, only the "state-fair" atmosphere that that was abound. Atlanta also had trouble with their transport; bus drivers getting lost & not being able to get the athletes to their venues on time.

And I also remember that Atlanta didn't have 'sunny skies' all of the 17 days, either. There were very rainy afternoons at times. "Mostly dreary overcast skies" is not something that would be unique to London.

And you're confusing about why the IOC chooses certain locations. Choosing Beijing for example, was about finally awarding the Worlds most populous country with a an excellent sporting prowess at the Summer Olympics a chance to showcase the Games to the world. I seriously doubt that when the IOC members sat down in 2001 at the Moscow session when they were voting for the 2008 Games that they were thinking "hmmmmmm, now were is going to be the best place to have 'Chinese' food".

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Also especially because he got one Pacquiao title fight. But one SuperBowl and one prize fight DO NOT an Olympics make. Poor Mr. Jones; someone's going to have to give him an Olympic Bidding 101 course.

He would be too busy stockpiling 15 draft picks in the upcoming NFL Draft and use that draft as a "Special Teams" draft to attend an Olympic Bidding 101 course.

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Atlanta is the reason many of these piss pot middling cities think they can host the Olympics, yet it was because of Atlanta that the IOC doesn't want to go back to the States - even when it is New York or Chicago - and the reason many of these piss pot middling cities never host.

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<br />Atlanta is the reason many of these piss pot middling cities think they can host the Olympics, yet it was because of Atlanta that the IOC doesn't want to go back to the States - even when it is New York or Chicago - and the reason many of these piss pot middling cities never host.<br />
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I don't think you have it all figured out. The fact that you are still pushing the tragic, lackluster Vancouver games doesn't engender much confidence in your taste. Funny thing is, between Vancouver and the debacle of Montreal, Canada's only respected games came from the most "piss pot middling" city of the bunch, Calgary.

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The thing is though, the WINTER Olympics pretty much always get handed over to the 'piss pot middling' cities, since the topography of the area is actually more important for the Winter Games. And also bcuz the Winter Games are a 1/3 of the size of their summer counterpart & are not as "glamorous" as the Summer Games, so therefore the majority of IOC members, who come from non-traditonal winter sport nations, don't care where they go.

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OK, here's the real-story behind the "tacky flea market" atmosphere Atlanta found itself in. As it got closer to the Games-time, the Atlanta City gov't felt it wasn't getting enough of the windfall pie they had anticipated. So they signed this promoter to create 'street fair' atmosphere for the Games. Boy, and he sure did. He OVER-signed vendors and retailers...so that the major open spaces of downtown were like souks and street bazaars hawking tons of tacky souvenirs. Now it was all done legally, so there was nothing ACOG or the IOC could do about it. It was never stipulated how many sub-vendors he could give licenses to. Actually, it was kinda nice for souvenir hunters.

Anyway, after that, the IOC created the Olympic SuperStore for subsequent Games where all Official Merchandise could be had--and they and the local Org Committee of course controlled prices.

So it was that; plus the bus transport, IBM glitches (and the Centennial Park bombing) that OK, did not make for a flawless Games -- but still all in all, considering the magnitude of the entire project, I think were negligible missteps. Anyway, it's done and one learns from one's mistakes. Problem is, the IOC has always been reactive rather than pro-active.

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