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The Great Southern Challenge


Alexjc

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Hola roca-jack! Bienvenidos a GameBids!

It's nice to see another Chileno opinion here. I understand your point about lack of government and public support in Chile _ KRATK, another Chileno here, has mentioned it, and my Chileno friends (my partner is from Puente Alto) are also doubtful or amazed when I mention the idea of a Santiago Winter Olympics to them. Still, as you said, Chile never expected to host a World Cup in Football, and as I discovered the other day, Chile was scheduled to hold a Pan-American Winter Games in 1993, so you never know what can eventuate.

Hasta luego!

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Gracias chileno, No pense que fueras chileno, tu inglés es bastante bueno....

Well, don´t forget that Chile in winter sports not only has that failed pan-am games in 1993 as previous records...

In 1966 Portillo, Chile held the first ski championship (and a real ski championship ,not only men, women or youth) that took place in the southern hemisphere. And if I´m not worng, it has been the only one (I´m meaning of course the whole category, not only men, women or youth as I said before).

And another fact....recently Portillo ranked 6th in the TOP 10 SKI RESORTS ranking made by travel channel and ski magazine. We also have world class ski resorts.

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I've been thinking that perhaps Punta Arenas could be a good winter host, and may even be able to host a WOG closer to the more usual dates (perhaps even May-April). Does anyone have any information on the facilities at Cerro Mirador?
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Question for the Aussies...but what about Hobart in Tasmania?  I know Aussie's treat Tassies like Canucks treat Newfies, but it is in the colder South and looks like it has some mountains.  Is it cold or snowy enough?

It looks like Vancouver did in the 1950's.

hobart.jpg

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Hmmm, good question. Most of the ski action in Oz is in NSW (Thredbo, Perisher) or Victoria (Mt Hotham, Buller) but there are resorts in Tassie _ I just looked up Ben Lomond there and it seems to be quite nice and decently equipped. As you said, Tasmania sure gets cold enough, and get's its fair share of snow _ probably more reliably than the mainland _ but it has virtually no profile as a ski destination in Oz _ I think Aussie ski buffs know about, and travel far more often to, New Zealand than Tasmania.

There's the whole question of the 800m downhill vertical drop required by the IOC _ I have no idea if anything like that's available in Tasmania. It's a beautiful place though _ sure worth researching more about.

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Nah there isn't an 800m drop in Tassie.

Gosh the more we talk about an Aust Winter Games the more i want it. Can't we just do some earthmoving at Thredbo and build an elevated start. And i know it is a national park but gee its only bloddy gum trees. :down:

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Nah there isn't an 800m drop in Tassie.

Gosh the more we talk about an Aust Winter Games the more i want it. Can't we just do some earthmoving at Thredbo and build an elevated start. And i know it is a national park but gee its only bloddy gum trees. :down:

Well, that's just what Roy and HG suggested. Maybe we can dust off and re-present Smiggin Holes.

main.jpg

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Nah there isn't an 800m drop in Tassie.

Gosh the more we talk about an Aust Winter Games the more i want it. Can't we just do some earthmoving at Thredbo and build an elevated start. And i know it is a national park but gee its only bloddy gum trees. :down:

Well, that's just what Roy and HG suggested. Maybe we can dust off and re-present Smiggin Holes.

main.jpg

unleash the mongrel??? :P

thats so aussie :D

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  • 3 weeks later...

One key advantage that Santiago would have over a NZ bid of any sort is the fact that Santiago is a major air hub for LanChile. Lately, the trend has been more and to give the Games to cities with hubs

1996-Atlanta (Delta Air Lines' main hub)

2000-Sydney (Qantas' main hub)

2002-Salt Lake City (Delta's western US hub)

2004-Athens (Olympic Airlines' main hub)

2008-Beijing (Air China's main hub)

2010-Vancouver (Air Canada's Pacific Rim Hub)

2012:

NYC is a hub for Continental, American, and Delta

Paris is Air France's Hub

Moscow for Aeroflot

Madrid for Iberia

London for British Airways

If the games were in Christchurch, all the feed flights would presumably have to be routed via Sydney, Melbourne, and Auckland.

Just another thought

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Christchurch airport is the second busiest in NZ with around 5 million passengers a year (increasing 30% over the past year alone). There are regular direct flights to Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Singapore, Japan, Seoul, the Pacific Islands (and on to the Americas), with a direct Los Angeles service coming in by the end of the year. This puts the city within one stopover of Europe via up to seven different cities on six different airlines currently, and by 2014 there will be an even greater number of routes. The possibility of flying through Auckland greatly increases this number.

Christchurch has successfully help the Commonwealth Games in 1974 (regarded as the defining games of that era), and in the last five years alone has hosted the World Wheelchair games twice, the World Firefighters Games, the Softball World Cup, the Women's Cricket World Cup, the FIFA Under 17 Soccer World Cup and the Netball World Cup, as well as huge numbers of lesser known events.

People have detailed the venues previously. Jade Stadium has a capacity of 40,000 with plans to expand to over 50,000. The QEII Commonwealth Stadium can hold 20,000 but would easily be expanded. The Westpac Centre is NZ's largest indoor venue and holds over 8,000. Alpine Ice is one of only three ice skating rinks in NZ, and there are plans to build another with a greater capacity on the same site as QEII Stadium.

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Well I'll be darned, you're absolutely right.

Korean from Seoul

Emirates from Dubai

Air New Zealand to Tokyo/Narita

Singapore Airlines to Singapore

Okay I'm sold, and shocked. I had imagined Christchurch to have a quaint little 5-8 gate airport. Looks like I'm DEAD wrong.

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Found this from a simple websearch.

Apparently, someone was seriously looking into a Christchurch-Southern Lakes or Southern Lakes (by itself) bid for the 2010s. So it must very much be on the radar as far as it being a distinct possibility.

http://www.snowfarmnz.com/index.c....10.html

Also, how much do you think the positive experience from Sydney 2000 would rub off on a New Zealand Olympic Winter Games bid, as many consider them to be very similar nations?

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About airports... Let's talk about the Aeropuerto Internacional Arturo Merino Benítez.

Santiago's airport is one of the biggers airports in Latinamerica and the best one of the subcontinent. Airlines like Delta, American Airlines, British Airways, Lufthansa, Varig, Iberia, Air France, Aeroméxico, Continental Airlines and Qantas have regular flyies to Santiago de Chile. Also is the hub of LAN, the bigger airline in Latinamerica. If you want to know more enter to the site of LAN (former LanChile)

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The fact that Santiago has a much busier and better serviced airport isn't in question. I'm just saying Christchurch Airport isn't incapable of getting a lot of people into the city in a short period of time.

The Southern Lakes area would struggle to host the games by itself. The main area of Queenstown has very little infrastructure that isn't directly related to tourists, although accommodation wouldn't be a problem. But things such as transporting athletes around the windy hilly terrain etc would be difficult. Not to mention somewhere to actually hold the main ceremonies. That's why it would have to be a joint effort between the Christchurch and Southern Lakes area.

There's 14 skifields around Christchurch, 10 of which are within two hours drive, so it wouldn't be unreasonable to hold it solely in that area. But if I was the organisers I'd want the postcard beauty of the Queenstown area involved as much as possible.

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Found this article on Google - it's from before the 2010 bid fell through:

Winter wonderland

A Christchurch businessman with family ties to the sexy world of aluminium is launching a bid to host the 2010 Winter Olympics. Paul Brislen discovers he’s not as mad as you might think.

Paul Brislen

Thursday, 1 February, 2001

He doesn’t look like a lunatic, but he must be, right? Christchurch businessman Bruce Ullrich has a plan to turn the South Island into the winter sport capital of the southern hemisphere: hosting the 2010 Winter Olympics in Christchurch, making $4 billion for the country, and costing the taxpayer almost nothing. He must be crazy.

No. Ullrich, cousin to the Ullrich Aluminium family, is serious. “The Winter Olympics have never been held in the southern hemisphere before — we’ve certainly got a shot at being short-listed at the very least.”

Mike Moore floated the idea in 1986; it was examined by a committee, including Ullrich, with Bob Jones as chair. In 1990 Ullrich started an MBA and wrote his thesis about the idea, concluding it was probably doable if it was based in Christchurch and used Queenstown to a lesser extent.

To drive the winter games concept, Ullrich has set up Winter Games Promotion Inc. Other company directors involved are former NZ Law Society president Austin Forbes, John Lee, who set up the Waiorau Snow Farm (see “Snow into dough”, in “Meet the transformers”), and Richard Edmond, director of medical services for a number of Kiwi Olympic and Commonwealth Games teams. The group has just set up a charitable trust specifically for the bid, Winter Olympic Bid 2010, which will be charged with coming up with the $2 million or so Ullrich reckons they’ll need for the next stage. It is currently searching for executive staff, including a CEO.

Isn’t it slightly over-optimistic to think New Zealand has even a tiny hope of being able to run the event? A Winter Olympics, says Ullrich, is only about the same size as a Commonwealth Games (okay, there might be a few more journalists there) and New Zealand has shown itself to be more than capable of running an event of that nature.

Ullrich himself was vice chair of the organising committee for the 1974 Commonwealth Games in Christchurch. He then spent a decade with the New Zealand Olympic Committee, culminating in the vice president’s job before leaving in 1995. He was also chef de mission for three New Zealand teams during the 1980s, including the team that competed in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. “I’ve always had that interest and that background in sport and what it can do for the country.”

But the facilities? Don’t we need ski runs, bobsled tracks, ski jumps, ice-skating facilities and so on? Not a problem, says Ullrich. We’ve got 10 years and we’re hardly alone in not having all the facilities we need yet.

“Helsinki in Finland is bidding. They don’t have any mountains, so I think they’re looking at using the mountains in Norway. We don’t have a problem with mountains.” He envisages putting the alpine skiing at Mount Hutt (“We’ve had it surveyed by an expert and with some modifications we could get the necessary downhill length”). The indoor ice events, for example, could go in temporary facilities. “That reduces the cost. For the athlete’s village we could use the student accommodation at Lincoln or Canterbury and if needs be we can move cruise ships into Lyttleton harbour for temporary accommodation. That’s been done before.”

Competition for the 2010 Games could well be fierce. Hardly surprising, since Ullrich reckons you are fighting for a share of approximately $NZ1 billion for television rights alone (Sydney ended up with nearly $US1 billion from TV rights for last year’s summer games). Along with the Christchurch bid and Helsinki’s mountainless attempt, there are strong indications that Muju in Korea will put in a bid, Jaca in Spain, Whistler and Vancouver in Canada, Zakopane in Poland and Sarajevo in Bosnia, not to mention St Petersburg in Russia, a tri-nations approach from Slovenia, Austria and Italy, Lourdes in France and Osterund in Sweden. That’s quite a list, but they are all northern hemisphere countries and the European challenges should be nullified by the 2006 Turin Games, Ullrich says. He is convinced the International Olympic Committee (IOC) would look favourably at a well-organised southern hemisphere bid for 2010.

“Our attitude will be low-cost and no-frills,” Ullrich says. “The first step is to tell the IOC we’d like to put in a bid. That has to be done by September 2001, followed by a meeting between the IOC and the applicants in February 2002. In August the IOC will accept the candidates and then evaluate each bid, making its selection in mid-2003. In all that time, Ullrich’s budget allows for only $2 million to be spent — half from government and half from corporate sponsorship. That’s a huge drop from Ullrich’s original estimate of over $5 million. “We had budgeted nearly $3 million just for IOC wives and girlfriends to come over, but since Salt Lake and the bribery scandal, that’s all gone by the by. The rules have been changed and it’s much simpler to mount a bid these days.”

But Ullrich and company will still face an uphill battle, -including scepticism from the existing sporting community. One insider who didn’t want to be named summed up a view among some in the establishment: “It’s a huge undertaking — the commitment and the financing alone are huge, let alone the logistics of it. It’s not just a simple matter of heading off to Queenstown and putting up a ski run; it’s far more complex than that. And very expensive.”

Even before pacifying the sceptics, Ullrich also has to convince the New Zealand Olympic Committee, which has the final say on any bid, that he can do it. If it says no, no amount of insanity will get the job done.

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I agree that Christchurch should anchor an NZ bid. Queenstown is beautiful and all, but it seems the Winter Games are moving towards bigger host cities (Salt Lake, Turin, Vancouver) and I don't think Queenstown alone would be able to handle it all _ plus would the area need all the extra infrastructure like stadiums, ice rinks etc, which are already in Christchurch. I don't see anything wrong with some events being split out to there, however.

As timnz2000 said, Christchurch/Canterbury probably could do it all at a pinch, but it would be a pity not to be able to use the Queenstown Lakes region's beauty in an NZ Winter Games.

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I agree that Christchurch should anchor an NZ bid. Queenstown is beautiful and all, but it seems the Winter Games are moving towards bigger host cities (Salt Lake, Turin, Vancouver) and I don't think Queenstown alone would be able to handle it all _ plus would the area need all the extra infrastructure like stadiums, ice rinks etc, which are already in Christchurch. I don't see anything wrong with some events being split out to there, however.

As timnz2000 said, Christchurch/Canterbury probably could do it all at a pinch, but it would be a pity not to be able to use the Queenstown Lakes region's beauty in an NZ Winter Games.

I don't know about that. Some say that Albertville and, especially Lillehammer, came to be because of Calgary. In other words, some people don't like the idea of the Winter Olympics going to bigger and bigger cities. For them, "smaller" cities or even just resorts appeal to them more.

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Guardian wrote:

I don't know about that. Some say that Albertville and, especially Lillehammer, came to be because of Calgary. In other words, some people don't like the idea of the Winter Olympics going to bigger and bigger cities. For them, "smaller" cities or even just resorts appeal to them more.

No. not at all, Guardian.  Albertville and Lillehammer were picked because of (a) in Albertville's case, Barcelona won the summer, (Paris lost),so as a consolation price to France, they gave those '92 Winter Games to ALbertville.  (B)  Lillehammer,  Salt Lake did not launch a very good bid that year, so, by default, Lillehammer got it.  

After Salt Lake, Turin and Vancouver, I think the IOC will pick medium cities over small resort-type towns because even the WG have grown so much (what? 80 nations in Salt Lake). PLUS needed are similar accommodations for the world press AND the TV crews, who combined, in the WG probably outnumber the 3200 athletes, so that no small villages of 10,000 people or less can now accommodate such Games.  So, if you count 3200 athletes, maybe 2500 press, 1000 other assorted foreign TV crews (NBC alone has some 3,100 people in Athens), maybe what?  15-18,000 visitors a day?  Security forces of 5,000?  Homes for the volunteer-workers?  So you will need at least some 25,000 hotel rooms for a WG.  

THe IOC seeks out a minimum of 40,000 rooms for an SG.  No sleepy hamlet of 10,000 can provide those required accommodations.

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Here's yet more info on what has already been planned for a Christchurch Olympic Games.

http://www.ifyouski.com/news/newsarticle/?ObjectID=1930515

Snip:Canterbury was to host the downhill skiing and ice skating events while the Cardrona Valley, between Wanaka and Queenstown, would be home to Nordic cross-country skiing, biathlon, luge and ski jump disciplines.

------------------------------------------------------

It looks like most of the planning has already been done. The difficult part is finding the few million dollars that are necessary to put up the bid

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A question for the Kiwis _ in that preliminary bid that Ullrich was planning for 2010, what time of the year was he thinking of holding the games? Had planning got that far?

PS: I agree with Guardian _ I hope Christchurch puts in a bid soon for the World Figure Skating Championships.

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