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The Great Southern Challenge


Alexjc

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I really hope New Zealand can crack it for a Gold Medal at a Winter Olympics soon. I think that's the type of thing that could spark some serious consideration of making a bid.

Any likely prospects?

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Why does a 400km trip take 7 hours?

dunno, but my NZ road atlas said it is a 7 hour drive from christchurch to queenstown. Probably cos you have to drive through the alps

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Let's not forget the other most likely southern contender, Chile. I've copied over some details on Santiago and neighbouring ski resorts from Kratk's posting on the Santiago 2018 thread. It sure sounds like they'd also have the capability as well.

SANTIAGO DE CHILE

Capital of the Metropolitan Region

Capital of the Republic of Chile (República de Chile)

Population : 5,650,000 hab. (2002)

Founded in February 12th, 1549, by Pedro de Valdivia, Governator and Conqueror of the Kingdom of Chile, colony of the Spanish Empire. Santiago was the first town in the country, and capital of the General Capitany of Chile.

In 1810, Santiago became capital of the new independent Republic of Chile.

In 1962, Santiago host the final match of the Football World Cup in the Estadio Nacional.

Santiago is a big town in a nice valley. Two rivers cross the valley: Maipo and Mapocho. The city was founded between a hill (Huelén or Santalucía) and the Mapocho River. The valley was limited by four mountain chains, but the most important is the Andes in the west. Near Santiago are mountains over the 5,000 mts. like the Tupungato (6,570 mts), Volcán Tupungatito (5,913), Volcán San José (5,856) and the Volcán Maipo (5,323).

At east of Santiago is Valparaíso, the second important city, and Viña del Mar, a beautiful place with long beaches and host of the Festival Internacional de la Canción, the most important music festival in Latinamerica.

The clime of Santiago is Mediterranean Template. The summer (january and february) is hot and dry (media 22,7ºC and max. 37º) and the winter (june-july) is cold (9ºC).

Now Santiago had an important, simple and modern subway sistem; four highway cross the city and three connect Santiago with Valparaiso-Viña, San Antonio and the rest of the country (the Panamerican Highway). The Santiago's Airport is the best airport in the subcontinent and connect all the country, the Desertic North, the Rainy South, the Austral Patagonia, the Antarctica and the misterious Easter Island (Rapa Nui)

Ski Centers:

-Portillo: 2,841 metres over the sea. A famous center over the world. Excelent snow fields, host of the Ski World Cup 1966. 149 kms of Santiago

-Farellones-El Colorado: 32 kms of Santiago and 2,430 metres over the sea. It's the most popular ski center in Chile

-La Parva Village: Near Farellones, 38 kms of Santiago and 2,662 mts of altitude.

-Valle Nevado: The Southern hemisphere’s largest skiable surface: over 22,000 acres with 24 miles of runs. Host two times the Snowboard World Cup.

Stadium:

-"Estadio Nacional" or National Stadium: Built in 1938 by the President Arturo Alessandri Palma. His son, the President Jorge Alessandri, rebuilt the stadium in 1962. Host of the 1962 FIFA World Cup, a Davis Cup final match and home of the Chilean Football Team, La Roja. The stadium isn't affected by 3 big earthquakes, last one in 1985. Capacity: 77,000

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Australia would be capable of hosting a Winter Olympics. We have the snow, and the mountains, it's just the logistics aren't working in our favour. The National Parks control a large percent of the Snowy Mountains, and they would never approve an Olympics in the park, they barely allow the Ski resorts to do anything that might disturb the delicate eco-system that is unique to that part of the world.

I think if we didn't have the restrictions of the National Parks, Canberra would make a good winter host. All the indoor event could be held in Canberra, they have tons of land on which to build the venues. Canberra is also around 1 and half to 2 hours from the ski fields. It's not really too far, though they would have to fix the Monaro Highway between Canberra and Jindabyne and maybe put in some public transport, maybe fix up the old rail line that use to run down to Cooma. Than we have the Victorian side of the Australian Alps, Mt Buller has hosted world ski events and would be able to host things like the ski aerials etc...

If we get really ambitious, we could co-host with New Zealand and hold some of the ski events over there, while we host the indoor events. That would probably be Australia's best option if it was to avoid the National Parks.

A Winter Olympics in Australia could be done, but it would be a lot of money and a lot of red tape and negotiation with the National Parks, with some major building of infrastructure, which wouldn't go to waste after the Games.

I'd still love to see New Zealand host the first Southern Hemisphere Winter Olympics :cool:

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I was trying to find a link for "The Ice Dream" but it doesn't seem to exist anymore.

But I did find this:

Smiggin Holes 2010

Seriously though, While In think "Canberra 2018" has a nice ring to it, I think the big prob for Oz is a downhill/alpine run with a suitable vertical drop height. A joint bid with NZ could work, but I don't know if the IOC would go for it, and the Kiwis would probably want to do it on their own if it got that far anyway.

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Here's some info and piccies from www.ski.com.au about our main ski areas that would be used if Canberra hosted.

Thredbo

Thredbo prides itself on the longest vertical in Australia (672m) with the longest run being 5.5km, of course this run winds down the mountain in broad sweeping turns and anyone with even skidded parallels would probably only ski it once.

Despite that the length of the runs at Thredbo are a great appeal to many people with 2 express quads accessing the "super trails" it has a lot going for it when it is truely top to bottom. The main problem that Thredbo has is its low base elevation of only 1365m resulting in the bottom of the runs often being slushy.

To overcome the lack of natural stuff below about 1500m Thredbo has invested heavily in snowmaking with 380 guns capable of covering 60 hectares almost at will. This has allowed Thredbo to design a custom made beginners area (Friday Flat) and also run top to bottom for most of the season.

Vertical Drop : 2037m - 1365m

thredbo.jpeg

Perisher Blue including Guthega and Blue Cow

The catch cry for Perisher Blue has to be "bigger is better". There is no doubt about it Perisher Blue is BIG, a whopping 1245 hectares of skiable terrain (reduced from 1250ha in 2002 by voluntary exclusion of habitat of the endangered Mountain Pygmy Possum at Blue Cow Mountain). Perisher Blue provides a huge amount of variety over a vertical drop of about 420m. Perisher Blue is serviced by around 50 lifts which are both surface and chairs. Since Perisher Blue is spread over 7 peaks you can always find an uncrowded area.

There is on snow accommodation at Perisher Valley, Smiggin Holes, and some at Guthega. Not all the accommodation is ski in ski out so if that is what you want just be careful, you may be getting oversnow home each night!

Perisher Blue provides a wide range of activities with night skiing, cross country trails, and a dedicated snowboard park just to name a few. The limited snowmaking coverage sometimes means that the full resort is a little late in opening and you often may have difficulty skiing between the different peaks in low snow times.

Vertical Drop: 2034m - 1605m

perim.jpg

Selwyn Snowfields

Selwyn Snowfields promote themselves as "Your Winter Playground" and they go a long way towards exactly that with a family orientation. Selwyn is undoubtedly good value with lift tickets cheaper than the major resorts. There is a definite family feel about the resort and unless you are an extreme skier/boarder you just can't help but feel right at home here. Selwyn Snowfields offers the best beginners skiing in NSW with a wide range of beginners/early intermediate slopes to choose from.

Selwyn offers the complete snow experience for first timers with the downhill skiing being complemented by a wide range of cross country trails, snowplay areas and even dedicated toboggan run & tubing park - with their own lifts! The main drawback for Selwyn is that there is no on snow accommodation so you have to stay 30 minutes or more from the slopes and drive in each day. If you consider yourself an advanced skier then Selwyn will be a bit light on challenging terrain, the black runs would be marked blue anywhere else, but even at the intermediate level Selwyn offers enough variety to keep you happy for a day or two.

In 1996 Selwyn Snowfields began investing in snowmaking which has made the cover a lot more reliable. This expansion has continued with over 80% of the resort now covered by snowmaking. With the rock free base on which they operate Selwyn can open on low snow levels and you should expect them to operate most of the resort for the nearly the whole season.

Vertical Drop: 1614m - 1492m

trailmap.gif

Charlotte Pass

Charlotte Pass is Australia's first ski resort, established in the early 1900's, it is also Australia's highest resort with a base elevation of 1760m. Charlotte Pass is unique for a number of reasons, it is the only snowbound resort in Australia, with access during the season by oversnow transport from Perisher Valley the only way in! Charlotte Pass also owns the record for the lowest temperature ever recorded in Australia -23 degrees Celsius.

The isolation of the resort is its main appeal with a maximum of 607 guests at any given time there are rarely if ever major lift lines to worry about. With genuine on snow accommodation all lodges offer ski in ski out accommodation and magnificent views. Despite only having 5 lifts (1 chair, 1 T bar, 2 pomas and a rope tow) there is a surprising amount of skiing to be had with 2 lifts to the main ridge line of the bowl you can choose from fast groomed trails, tree skiing or even some chutes!

Charlotte Pass offers unparalled access to the main range and so is an excellent base for cross country skiing. During summer its position allows access to some of NSWs best high country walks, to Kosciusko, Blue Lake and a whole lot more.

Vertical Drop : 1954m - 1760m

wpe51.jpg

I didn't include any Victorian venues as i think that they would be too far away. By the looks of it Australia fails the required 800m drop standards. Didn't Nagano have the same problems...how'd they fix it?

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I was reading the other night that Sarajevo (I think it was) had the same problem. They built an elevated platform at the start to solve the problem (can anyone confirm this?). And Mattygs in an earliuer posting on this string mentioned something similar with Mt Hutt, with a bit of artificial snowmaking on the lower reaches as a solution. It seems that might be one of the more solvable problems.
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I thought that i might add on with some possible nz venues that matty said:

Mt. Hutt

MtHuttTrailMaplargepage.jpg

Could host - Alpine Skiing, Freestyle Skiing, Bob/Luge

81.9km from christchurch city

Nestled high inside the eastern rim of the Southern Alps is Mt Hutt Ski Area, which receives some of the deepest, lightest, driest powder in Australasia. Overlooking the spectacular vista of the sprawling patchwork quilt of the Canterbury Plains with the blue Pacific Ocean in the far distance, skiers and snowboarders from all around the world can revel in the longest season in the Southern Hemisphere.

Being in the heart of the Southern Alps is a truly awesome experience. It has its practical advantages for beginners and experts alike. Powderhounds just won't believe their luck. With plenty of adrenaline-pumping Black Diamond runs on the South Face, extreme skiers and boarders will have as many different challenges as they can handle. The wide open terrain is great for first-time skiers and families too. Mt Hutt's new specially designed Children's Centre, Ski and Snowboard School and purpose built beginners area will definitely teach you a thing or two. Snowmaking starts early May, ensuring great snow for the whole season. All this is just one hour's drive from cosmopolitan Christchurch and a stone's throw from the friendly country town of Methven, Mt Hutt's village.

Coronet Peak

57.jpg Queenstown

coronet-ov.jpg

CoronetTrailMaplargepage.jpg

Could host - Freestyle Skiing

Queentown’s original resort ski area is just 25 minutes from town. With a reputation for some of the best and varied terrain in Australasia it is no wonder that Coronet Peak has developed a truly international flavour.

Coronet Peak leads the way in innovation by hosting high profile events such as the Queenstown Winter Festival and Compaq 50k of Coronet endurance race, and winning the best New Zealand Resort (NZSBA) plus over 3 New Zealand Tourism Awards.

Coronet Peak’s wide and rolling terrain provides maximum fun for all. Extensive snowmaking ensures that everyone can get the utmost enjoyment for the longest time possible.

For those wanting to try the latest gear check out the Fun Zone demo centre. An award-winning ski and snowboard school will set you up or hone your skills, allowing you to maximise your enjoyment and time on the slopes. Even when the sun goes down, the action never stops – Night Skiing, exclusive to Coronet Peak, allows skiers and riders to continue through the twilight hours into the magic of the night.

The Remarkables

53.jpg

Across the valley lies The Remarkables, Queenstown's true alpine ski area. Here the emphasis is very definitely on joining in and having fun, especially if you're a beginner, intermediate or looking for serious adrenaline.

The Remarkables enjoys three sunny sheltered bowls framed by towering peaks, and is known for its friendly atmosphere and relaxed feel. It's a great place to learn to ski with easy access to learner runs by an easy to use chairlift. And if you're ready to sample life on the edge, you'll find challenging terrain like you've never seen before and some of the longest off-piste runs around. Kids are well catered for and kids 10 years and under get a free day lift pass. In fact after a day of fun at Skiwiland or in the creche they may never want to go home again.

When you need to restock your reserves and take a well-earned break, you'll find a satisfying selection of fresh food and drinks at the self-service cafe plus you can browse for mementoes in the Sno Shop. Or maybe you'd prefer to soak up the rays and watch the playful antics of New Zealand's cheeky native parrot, the Kea.

 

Whatever you chose, The Remarkables is the ideal place to make the most of winter's offerings. For small kids and big kids alike, check out the new tubing park for great fun in the snow!

Lake Wanaka - Cardrona, Treble Cone, Snowfarm - Nordic

cardrona

trail_map_cardrona.jpg

Treble Cone

trail_map_tc.jpg

Snowfarm - Nordic

trail_map_snowfarm.gif

Could host - Biathlon, Ski Jumping, Nordic Combined Cross Country Skiing, Snowbording.

Whether you are a skier, boarder, heli-skier, x-country skier, back country tourer or just looking for a relaxing and unique winter holiday, Wanaka will become your favourite destination.

Between them Cardrona and Treble Cone provide over 870 hectares of terrain; from gentle beginner slopes to broad, "feel good" and well-groomed runs, to awesome half-pipes, superb off-trail skiing and boarding, long powder runs and steep chutes. The fields are high and the snow is some of the most reliable in the country. Vertical offered is exceptional, from 390 - 888 metres.

On the opposite site of the Cardrona valley is an innovative new course gaining a reputation amongst snowboarders. Snowboarders should check out the Snowpark.

For the ultimate day out in the mountains check out the heliski or heliboarding options. Professionally guided helicopter access offers maximum time on the snow and almost unlimited access to the awesome terrain of New Zealand's Southern Alps. Be warned, it's addictive!

And for variety, try nordic/cross country skiing and enjoy a magical day at the Snow Farm, with over 40kms of pristine groomed trails to choose from and superb family facilities, cafe, restaurant, bar, nordic ski school and equipment hire.

One of the special things about Wanaka is the lack of crowds. Frustrating queues for lifts are the exception, not the norm. You can ski or snowboard without watching your back, choose your own route down the mountain without having to give way to a multitude of others. Enjoy a long lunch at one of the outdoor mountain cafes and revel in the scenery. The service is good and the atmosphere is laid-back and friendly.

Jade Stadium

Could host - Ceremonies

holds up to 40,000 people but would be expaned and upgraded.

Westpac Centre

westpactrust-centre.jpg

Holds up to 9,000

Could host - curling, short track or figer skating

other venues in Christchurch could be:

Bob/Luge, Ice Hockey and Speed Skating

:D

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Thredbo prides itself on the longest vertical in Australia (672m)

Ah, I just noticed the figures. That would make it a bit hard. 128m is a fair bit of vertical drop to try and make up.

It's back to the Roy & HG solution _ start dumping rubbish on Mt Koskiusko!

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That would be wierd the winter olympics in the summer and world cup in the winter, strange but could happen, though this probably won't because of the training and the fact that the world cup seasons would be long over so the athletes would not be the regular training and probably whine alot
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i just thought of something for the melbourne olympics the horse events were in sweden, well may have the ice events in new zealand, australia ect, and have the snow events in europe or north america most likely canada if it were nz or australia because of commonwealth times. this would keep the games in there normal times and would allow a southern countries to esperience at least part of the olympic winter games
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I think a Southern WOG in 2018 depends of the WC. If the WC goes to Oceania (= Australia) the WOG in Chile are the favourite bid. If the WC will be in February or March in Australia, the WOG would be in July in Southern Hemisphere ¿Where? If Australia has the WC, the natural choice for the IOC would be Chile. An Oceanic WC discard an Australian or New Zealandan bid.

But, if the WC goes to the Northern (USA, Canada or England), I think the WOG in Southern at the same time... Mmmm, it isn't impossible, but it's going to be difficult.

ES NUESTRA OPORTUNIDAD!!!

JUEGOS OLÍMPICOS DE INVIERNO, SANTIAGO 2018!!!

santiago1.jpg

mapocho.jpg

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That would be wierd the winter olympics in the summer and world cup in the winter, strange
welcome to our world
i just thought of something for the melbourne olympics the horse events were in sweden, well may have the ice events in new zealand, australia ect, and have the snow events in europe or north america most likely canada if it were nz or australia because of commonwealth times. this would keep the games in there normal times and would allow a southern countries to esperience at least part of the olympic winter games

Whats the point of that? it is so not necessary

Do you not realise that all the southern hemisphere countries that compete in the winters Olympics have to go and practise over sea. So its harder to compete for a southern hemisphere country in the winter Olympic games. So don’t u think it would be nice to give the underdog southern hemisphere countries a leg up.

I think a Southern WOG in 2018 depends of the WC.

what does the fifa world cup got to do with the Winter games.? :help:

just one more thing. will u people from the northern Hemisphere stop being such drama queens. It’s not that weird watching the winter games in summer. just let it go, its pathetic. Chile or new Zealand could host the games in late April – early May and that not even really summer in the north.

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most of New Zealand and Australias winter athletes train in Canada, yes i know this, there is nothing wrong with sharing the olympics and its not like Australia need s league up in sports, come on they have one of the most organized hockey leagues outside of Europe and North America. they have won three medals including two gold, and are willing to put the money up for sports, its not a south hemispheres porogitive to be good at the winter olympics, its there porogitive to be good, at soccer, rugby, cricket, swimming, track and other sports. each country has there main sports except it, for southern hemisphere countries its summer sports or no sports at all.

the world cup will not be in the southern hemisphere again until 2022 whens its slated for austral-asia most likly china so that can't be a factor is giving the countries a winter olympics

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I think a Southern WOG in 2018 depends of the WC.

what does the fifa world cup got to do with the Winter games.? :help:

just one more thing. will u people from the northern Hemisphere stop being such drama queens. It’s not that weird watching the winter games in summer. just let it go, its pathetic. Chile or new Zealand could host the games in late April – early May and that not even really summer in the north.

It's an important factor. If I organize a international event, I won't celebrate it at the same time with another important. I don't say if the WC is in the North, the WOG hasn't any chance of be in the South. Maybe it could happen like the 2004: June, with the Euro 2004; July, with the Copamerica; and August with Athens.

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most of New Zealand and Australias winter athletes train in Canada, yes i know this, there is nothing wrong with sharing the olympics and its not like Australia need s league up in sports, come on they have one of the most organized hockey leagues outside of Europe and North America. they have won three medals including two gold, and are willing to put the money up for sports, its not a south hemispheres porogitive to be good at the winter olympics, its there porogitive to be good, at soccer, rugby, cricket, swimming, track and other sports. each country has there main sports except it, for southern hemisphere countries its summer sports or no sports at all.

the world cup will not be in the southern hemisphere again until 2022 whens its slated for austral-asia most likly china so that can't be a factor is giving the countries a winter olympics

Hockey League? Errr we don't have one or one of any comprehensive organization - there is only like 3 or 4 ice rinks in the whole country, therefore we do not compete in hockey at the WOG.

Australia has won 4 medals - 2 gold, 2 bronze . . . NZ has also won a silver. Are you saying that our lack of medals should negate us from holding a WOG? It hasn't stopped other hosts from winning in the past.

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It's an important factor. If I organize a international event, I won't celebrate it at the same time with another important. I don't say if the WC is in the North, the WOG hasn't any chance of be in the South. Maybe it could happen like the 2004: June, with the Euro 2004; July, with the Copamerica; and August with Athens.

It's going to take a lot of shuffling around the sports calendar, but the most likely scenario would seem to be having Australia or Argentina host a WC the same year New Zealand or Chile host WOG.  However If FIFA keeps doing continental rotations, this will prove difficult in the near future, especially 2018, with Brazil already hosting 2014.  But, I don't think the scheduling should keep southern countries from putting together a good try.  Chile is in a good situation to host soon; with the argument of new frontiers and with one of the best economies in Latin America, it could be a safer choice in the eyes of the IOC than Rio or BA for summer games.  It might not happen on the first try, but that's the way things are.

I agree that people just need to get over the seasons; that's the way the world is and you're not going to ignore Argentina, South Africa, Chile and New Zealand among many other possible off-season southern hemisphere summer and winter hosts (Rio is lucky enough to have the climate to host in July!).  I would totally welcome seeing snow on my television in July and August because it's always so hot in Texas!!   :idea:

KRATK, ¿tiene otras informaciones sobre Santiago de Chile, los instalaciones de deporte y su candidatura?

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Yes, the northerners are going have to get over the so-called "scheduling problem".

As nzolympic pointed out, Chile and NZ would probably at a pinch be able to host in, say, May. Don't people in the north watch TV (or have TV ratings) in May? What's so bizarre at watching ice and snow sports at that time. It's the olympics, guys, if you stage it, they will watch!

Training and sports season-wise? Well, if you want to win an olympic medal, you've got to be prepared to work for it. If that means staggering your training schedule for one season, so be it. If you're hungry for it you'll do it. There might even be advantages. When do the northern hockey league seasons run? Haven't there been problems releasing top players to the national teams because of olympic and league scheduling clashes?

 

The World Cup should have nothing to do with it. Nothing wrong with holding a WC in July or August in the north, and scheduling a southern WOG outside that time. It makes it a great extended period of TV viewing for the north. It's not hard to avoid a scheduling clash!

The hardest problem is probably convincing the general public in the southern contenders they could do it. At least NZ has raised the possibility in the past.  I don't think Chile has seriously considered it yet. The hard thing is I don't think either of them would win on a first bid _ we just have to hope that one of them eventually makes that first bid, and does well enough (at least make the short list) to be encouraged enough to go for a second bid.

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One other point _ the southern hemisphere countries have been able to already host a number of World Cup skiing events over the years without the whole winter sports calendar collapsing into sudden chaos.

This whole seasons-out-of-whack scheduling problems crap is nothing but northern hemisphere excuses. If there was a real will to bring the WOG down south, it could be done.

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Oh and by the way haven't you noticed a trend in the winter olympics in the past few years. Calgary large city, Lillehammer goes against the trend, Albertville same, but then Nagano, large city and surrounging area, Salt lake, large city, Turino large city, Vancouver large city, Munich and Zurich large cities

this is the trend the IOC wants large cities something the winter nations of the south can't exactly provide, don't get me wrong, if New Zealand were to bid, i would support them 100% even against my own country, i think it would be good for winter sports to expand to a larger area

Eruedan the reason Australia doesn't compete at the olympics in hockey is because they are in teir three group b you have to be in teir one, or the top two finishers in tier two groups a and b to be at the olympics in hockey,

and wouldn't it be imbarressing for you to have your hockey to at the olympics and get flatter my canada and sweden in front of your home people, the same goes for curling, just a thought, though i am shear if australia wanted to they could create a winter olympics team that could flatten anybody give time look at the results from sydney

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Oh and by the way haven't you noticed a trend in the winter olympics in the past few years. Calgary large city, Lillehammer goes against the trend, Albertville same, but then Nagano, large city and surrounging area, Salt lake, large city, Turino large city, Vancouver large city, Munich and Zurich large cities

this is the trend the IOC wants large cities something the winter nations of the south can't exactly provide, don't get me wrong, if New Zealand were to bid, i would support them 100% even against my own country, i think it would be good for winter sports to expand to a larger area

We're not exactly talking small villages when we're suggesting southern hemisphere hosts. Santiago de Chile has a population of 5.6 million(!). Christchurch, with 350,000 or so, may not be in that same league, but it is still the second largest city in NZ and has managed to stage a Commonwealth Games easily and successfully. It also has a lot of the potential central venues in place (and they are regularly filled for Rugby Super 12 and Test matches). That compares pretty well with Nagano (361,000), Salt Lake City (181,000) and Vancouver (560,000).

Potential host city size is one problem you can't throw at the south.

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True, Santiago would be largest to host if they got the games.

Population will not be a problem for New Zealand. Look at a country like Norway or Bosnia.

Santiago has a population of 4,434,900 (2004)

Christchurch's population is 339,700 (2004)

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Santiago and Christchurch still have another problem notarity, since they are not exactly the most known cities in the world

though i know one thing the south has going for them, the vote from asia africa and south american and central even so it may be close i hope New Zealand beautiful country and would be a great city

oh and who can nagano be larger then salt lake i remember hearing that salt lake was the largest city to host the winter games

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