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LuigiVercotti

Around The Rings' Golden 25 for 2011

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For those of you who find the personalities of the Olympic movement and associated groups etc of interest Ed Hula has had a public voted countdown running for the 25 most influential people for 2011. You can see the results here:

The Golden 25 Countdown for 2011

Some of the interesting results so far...

  • Septic Blather has dropped from No.1 to No.9 from 2010 to 2011
  • Brazilian Olympic Leaders Carlos Nuzman & Dilma Rousseff are seen as more influential than British Olympic Leaders Craig Reedie & Colin Moynihan
  • John Coates is in at No.12 for 2011 after a non-appearance in the 2010 list
  • Alexander Zhukov (Russian NOC boss) outranks the likes of Thomas Bach, Blather, Nawal El Moutawakel, Gilbert Felli, Jean Claude Killy and Larry Probst.

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i think that Seb Coe would make a good IOC president

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i think that Seb Coe would make a good IOC president

Well there are a couple of steps that need to happen before he can be a candidate. First off get through 2012 with no major dramas. Second get membership of the IOC. Then get into the exec committee plus have a role in several commissions. Finally get past or live longer than the likes of Thomas Bach, Gilbert Felli, John Coates, Mario Pescante and others who have been in the belly of the beast building up the alliances and political friendships necessary for a joust at the top job.

Having said that he would certainly have a lot going for him. Perhaps he should look to the career of Gerhard Heiberg for inspiration.

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Has any head of a games organising committee ever been IOC president? im thinking not, but not sure

I think Gianna would be awesome, she would seriously kick some butt in that place

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Has any head of a games organising committee ever been IOC president? im thinking not, but not sure

I think Gianna would be awesome, she would seriously kick some butt in that place

I think the only one to have done both jobs is Henri de Baillet-Latour from Belgium (who took on the 1920 Antwerp OCOG chairmanship). As for Gianna I'd have to disagree insofar Athens 2004 was probably the closest the IOC came organisationally to a Delhi 2010 kind of experience. She was a charismatic bid leader and certainly an excellent frontwoman for ATHOC but if you judge her performance on the organisation and finance of the games before they were held plus the financial and sporting black hole they left for Greece you can't honestly consider her as a viable IOC leader.

That's why I would be more interested in say Heiberg (having done such a fantastic job with Lillehammer 1994) with perhaps Jean Claude Killy a dark horse with his Albertville 1992 experience.

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Has any head of a games organising committee ever been IOC president? im thinking not, but not sure

I think Gianna would be awesome, she would seriously kick some butt in that place

Not usually (I guess only Heiberg and Killy). They are too able and competent and would put the old farts of Lausanne to shame. Can't think of any past Org Committee head being invited to join the IOC afterwards. Not Alex Cushing or Prentiss Hale (Squaw Valley 1960), not Ueberroth, not Mariscal, not Billy Payne, not Romney, not Gianna, not Furlong.

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Not usually (I guess only Heiberg and Killy). They are too able and competent and would put the old farts of Lausanne to shame. Can't think of any past Org Committee head being invited to join the IOC afterwards. Not Alex Cushing or Prentiss Hale (Squaw Valley 1960), not Ueberroth, not Mariscal, not Billy Payne, not Romney, not Gianna, not Furlong.

Yeah, Michael Knight missed out too (thank feck) from Sydney 2000 (considering it was really Sandy Holloway and Gary Pemberton who did a lot of the heavy lifting for SOCOG it would be risible for Knight to go to the big league of Lausanne).

Course this opens up Pandora's box of worms, why doesn't the IOC actually encourage at least temporary membership of the IOC for a past host city OCOG president. Okay perhaps for the likes of Gianna and Billy they may be a little reticent thanks to the problems experienced in their respective host cities before or during their games. However if anyone knows how an OCOG works and what hosting a games means it'd be them. Yes, the likes of Romney had other political fish to fry and Ueberroth had NOC responsibilities to live up to. However it would be interesting to see Furlong on the IOC between now and Sochi, or Seb Coe in there from London 2012 to Rio 2016.

But as you say Baron they are usually too competent to make their prospective IOC colleagues comfortable with their presence. How can the likes of an Al Sabah or a Junior WOF compare to someone who has actually had to work for a living and accomplish great things in the name of the Olympics.

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For those of you who find the personalities of the Olympic movement and associated groups etc of interest Ed Hula has had a public voted countdown running for the 25 most influential people for 2011. You can see the results here:

The Golden 25 Countdown for 2011

Some of the interesting results so far...

Where is the top 7 of this list ???

#7 - 2018 Bid Leaders : Killy, Witt, Cho

#6 - Thomas Bach

#5 - Alexander Zhukov

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Where is the top 7 of this list ???

#7 - 2018 Bid Leaders : Killy, Witt, Cho

#6 - Thomas Bach

#5 - Alexander Zhukov

Still to come I think...no doubt Jacques will get no.1

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Numbers 3 and 4 have been added:

Golden 25 -- Americas, Asia Continental Chiefs #3, #4

1/1/2011

Mario Vazquez Rana, #3, President of Pan American Sports Organization and the Association of National Olympic Committees

Mario Vazquez Rana, heading into his fourth decade as president of both the Pan American Sports Organization and the Association of National Olympic Committees, holds sway over every corner of the world.

Vazquez is single-minded in his efforts to direct as much money as possible to the world’s 205 National Olympic Committees through Olympic Solidarity, the IOC commission he leads. Olympic Solidarity, created to disburse IOC revenues to NOCs, will distribute more than $300 million expected from Vancouver and London.

The Olympic leader’s work to protect the autonomy of NOCs from government interference has become an important item for his agenda.

Of interest in 2011 will be whether Vazquez is successful with his attempt to remain a member of the IOC Executive Board through 2013, a year after his IOC membership ends at age 80. Re-elected as ANOC President for four more years in October, Vazquez also received a mandate from the general assembly requesting that the IOC allow him to serve on the EB as long as he leads ANOC. His current EB term ends in 2012, the year he is supposed to retire from the IOC.

Sheikh Ahmad Al Sabah, #4, President Olympic Council of Asia

As the importance of Asia grows in the Olympic Movement, so does the influence of OCA President Sheikh Ahmad Al Sabah.

Venerated among the 44-member NOCs in OCA, Sheikh Ahmad has led the group forward with the expansion of multi-sport games across the continent. He’s interested in innovation, encouraging the formation of Asian Beach Games, Martial Arts Games and Indoor Games.

The Asian Games have become as big as the Olympics, and competition is often intense to win the right to host the event.

Ahmad, 49, is the youngest leader of a continental association and has another 31 years to serve as a Kuwaiti IOC member before facing retirement age. Ahmad is likely to remain a growing influence in the IOC for years to come.

No surprise re Rana...he's been calling the shots for many a year now, with the combination of his wealth and his political linkage to the Class of Juan Antonio. As the go to man for the NOC's assembly he has a big stick to wield at the Exec Committee and Jacques if they steer try to clear of what the NOCs want. As for Al Sabah he is not venerated by the East Asians (just read any of Andrew Jenning's books on his position, influence and the lack of support he had from the Japanese and Koreans), and like his Qatari brethren in MaFIFA survives by spreading the petrochemical revenues around the poorer Asian NOCs. Whether he is more influential or important in 2011 than some of the others in the list, well I doubt that.

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Rogge and Carrion make a joint no.1:

Golden 25 -- IOC President, TV Negotiator # 1

1/3/2011

(ATR) With just three years left as IOC President, Jacques Rogge can shape the future of the organization beyond his tenure with a lucrative U.S. rights package for the 2014 and 2016 Olympics. Rogge has indicated that he’d like to see a deal worth $2 billion when bids from the U.S. networks are opened later this year, similar to what incumbent NBC has paid for Vancouver and London.

The IOC has taken its time to seek a new deal for the U.S., hoping to ride out a recession to get the best price possible. The U.S. TV rights are the IOC’s single-largest source of revenue.

“I want a win-win situation whereby the broadcasters feel happy to have the Games," Rogge told Around the Rings in an interview last week in Rio de Janeiro.

“It’s important for us because we redistribute 94 percent of our revenue. What we redistribute to the IFs, the NOCs, the grass roots development, Olympic Solidarity, two-thirds come from the TV rights in the United States and the rest of the world," Rogge said.

Rogge captains the exclusive TV Rights and New Media Commission, a six-member panel that includes Richard Carrion, IOC member from Puerto Rico, chairman of the IOC Finance Commission.

Carrion has the job of organizing the bidding for the U.S. rights and meets regularly with the networks to stoke the interest in bidding to air Sochi and Rio de Janeiro.

NBC rights run through 2012, with at least two of its three competitors expected to make competitive bids. Carrion and Rogge will be working to see that those bids generate the cash they believe the Olympics are worth in the U.S.

"We believe we have a good product. We are heartened by good TV ratings in Beijing and Vancouver. So I think the broadcasters know we mean business," Rogee told ATR.

Carrion, 58, IOC member since 1990, is mentioned as a possible successor to Rogge in 2013. Professionally, Carrion heads Puerto Rico’s top bank and just concluded a term as a director of the influential Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Rogge, 68, will end his second term as president in 2013.

In addition to the U.S. TV rights in 2011, Rogge will preside over the election of a host for the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Perhaps even more significant, Rogge will be encouraging as many cities as possible to bid for the 2020 Olympics in the coming months. Applications for the race close later this year.

The IOC President is also expected to decide early this year on proposals to add a half-dozen new events to the Sochi Olympics, a list that includes women’s ski jumping.

Must admit whilst I've heard of Carrion he hasn't had anywhere near the public impact as the likes of Pound, Bach, Coates, Pescante, El Moutawakel, Rana etc etc. Looks like Alex Gilady has lost his prominence and now its Carrion who'll be the bag man for the most financially important part of the IOC's income.

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