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FIFA World Cup 2026

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AGREED. Why even have the World Cup at all?? I mean a digital, online sweepstakes should do it. I'd even participate in that one. B)

Then maybe Tahiti would win! :lol:

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3 would be fine, but for this to work with the 100 theme, Uruguay has to have at least the opening match/ceremony, a semi, & the final, without question IMO. Maybe even both semis. Otherwise, it's just going to look like Argentina taking advantage of their neighbour's history to get a World Cup earlier than they would've done normally.

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3 would be fine, but for this to work with the 100 theme, Uruguay has to have at least the opening match/ceremony, a semi, & the final, without question IMO. Maybe even both semis. Otherwise, it's just going to look like Argentina taking advantage of their neighbour's history to get a World Cup earlier than they would've done normally.

That won't work either. If 2 countries host, then 1 gets opening match 1 gets final. Montevideo will probably get Final and Buenos Aires get Opening Match.

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Why can't you see that this isn't a 'partnership' of equals.

Think of it this way...Uruguay is to Argentina as Scotland is to England or Canada is the USA or Austria is to Germany about 1/10th the size.

So imagine an Austrian/German World Cup where Graz, Innsbruck, Salzburg and Linz host, but Hamburg, Cologne, Munich and Dortmund are denied.

To pull off the 2030 bid, Uruguay and Argentina need each other. Uruguay needs Argentina's wealth of larger cities and stadia and Argentina needs Uruguay's centennial draw. Argentina could possibly pull it off alone, but aligning with Uruguay is a marketing move to improve their chances.

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Argentina could host *A* World Cup without Uruguay, but probably not that World Cup. And for that matter, does Argentina want to share the limelight or do they think they can go at this on their own? Because if it's the latter, they might have to wait a bit, but then the event will be theirs and no one else's

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It's funny, after the Japan/Korea hosting and the trouble FIFA had with dealing with two nations, the received wisdom has been that FIFA doesn't like joint bids. Yet here we are and some people are saying Argentina would be better of with Uruguay because of the centenary angle.

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It's funny, after the Japan/Korea hosting and the trouble FIFA had with dealing with two nations, the received wisdom has been that FIFA doesn't like joint bids. Yet here we are and some people are saying Argentina would be better of with Uruguay because of the centenary angle.

I'm not usually a fan of giving Hosting Rights because of an Annerversary, but I take exception this time as it is 100 years since FIRST World Cup. It's true, Uruguay would never be able to host alone, but a Co-Host is Half and Half. Uruguay have Cities that can have Stadiums, even if the Stadiums get downscaled to 20,000 after the World Cup. Look at Arena das Dunas in Natal (Downscaled to about 26,000 After World Cup) and Arena Pantanal in Cuiaba (Downscaled to 28,000 After World Cup).

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I still think half and half is a bit too much of a concession for a Uruguay Centennial World Cup with Argentina.

4 - 8 or 5 - 7 or 4 -7 will do.


Then maybe Tahiti would win! :lol:

To be a bit serious here, if the World Cup were to expand to 40 teams and ensure 1 place for Oceania, then it's highly likely that for future WC's we can very well see Tahiti competing instead of New Zealand. Much like in the Confederations Cup. :P

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I'm not usually a fan of giving Hosting Rights because of an Annerversary, but I take exception this time as it is 100 years since FIRST World Cup. It's true, Uruguay would never be able to host alone, but a Co-Host is Half and Half. Uruguay have Cities that can have Stadiums, even if the Stadiums get downscaled to 20,000 after the World Cup. Look at Arena das Dunas in Natal (Downscaled to about 26,000 After World Cup) and Arena Pantanal in Cuiaba (Downscaled to 28,000 After World Cup).

Natal and Cuiaba are still FAR bigger than any city in Uruguay bar Montevideo. So they're not at all comparable either.

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Natal and Cuiaba are still FAR bigger than any city in Uruguay bar Montevideo. So they're not at all comparable either.

My point wasn't about the City, my point was that Temporary Seats are available. Yes, other than Montevideo, the other cities don't need a 50,000 Seater Capacity, but you could do 50,000 Seater with 30,000 Temporary Seats.

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Deny them the final? Surely not!

The opening would be more than an adequate nod and centennial celebration. The final is about the teams that made it, and the one that wins, not the host.

Why would Argentina want to foot the bill as senior partner (which they inevitably would be - there's no way it could be a 50-50 tournament) and not get the final?

Edited by Sir Rols
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We are all assuming that Uruguay/Argentina will get 2030. Blatter might get some more corrupt money from Countries.

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My point wasn't about the City, my point was that Temporary Seats are available. Yes, other than Montevideo, the other cities don't need a 50,000 Seater Capacity, but you could do 50,000 Seater with 30,000 Temporary Seats.

It still needs to be a matter of population though. Natal and Cuiaba are cities of nearly a million people. That's 9 to 10 times the size of the comparable cities in Uruguay. So it's not just about the stadiums and their post-World Cup use. Can these cities and the country handle the influx of people coming in that need beds to sleep in, restaurants to eat in, and the means to get in and out of these cities in the first place. And don't bring up Qatar as your counter-point.. we don't know how well or how pooly that's going to go and they are an oil-rich emirate that has the highest per capita GDP of any country on the planet. They are not the precedent you're looking for to justify a country like Uruguay to use a handful of cities with less than 100,000 people to try and host part of a World Cup.

We are all assuming that Uruguay/Argentina will get 2030. Blatter might get some more corrupt money from Countries.

We're just talking about the hypothetical if they do get it. Personally, I don't think they will. If FIFA really wants to celebrate the sport and the centennial of its biggest event, put it in England where the sport truly has its deepest roots.

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It still needs to be a matter of population though. Natal and Cuiaba are cities of nearly a million people. That's 9 to 10 times the size of the comparable cities in Uruguay. So it's not just about the stadiums and their post-World Cup use. Can these cities and the country handle the influx of people coming in that need beds to sleep in, restaurants to eat in, and the means to get in and out of these cities in the first place. And don't bring up Qatar as your counter-point.. we don't know how well or how pooly that's going to go and they are an oil-rich emirate that has the highest per capita GDP of any country on the planet. They are not the precedent you're looking for to justify a country like Uruguay to use a handful of cities with less than 100,000 people to try and host part of a World Cup.

We're just talking about the hypothetical if they do get it. Personally, I don't think they will. If FIFA really wants to celebrate the sport and the centennial of its biggest event, put it in England where the sport truly has its deepest roots.

I respect you so much for that last paragraph. My England, the Home of Football should finally get the World Cup!

Again*.

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I respect you so much for that last paragraph. My England, the Home of Football should finally get the World Cup!

Again*.

There's a couple of posters here (mostly from South America) that think it's already been pre-determined that Argentina/Uruguay will get the 2030 World Cup if they want it. Personally I think that's a load of crap since FIFA doesn't strike me as the type of organization that will make that plan years in advance and then stick to it.

Yes, Uruguay hosted the first World Cup in 1930, but is it in FIFA's best interests to be there for 2030? Are they about to make a choice like that for sentimental reasons rather than doing what is best for the game or at least what's best for their bank accounts? I understand Russia over England for the 2018 World Cup. Politics and other issues aside, I can see the benefit of that decision from FIFA's standpoint if they're trying to grow the sport in a rich, populous country that has never hosted before. I just don't see the logic behind Argentina/Uruguay in that regard, especially specific to 2030. Again, if FIFA wants to celebrate 100 years of their great tournament, it's the perfect time to return to England IMO

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Yet they decided to do both 2018 and 2022 in one hit, go figure.

I really think if FIFA were to reform, it will give 2026 to North America. Either Canada or the USA. Then it's up to 2030 where the fight will be between Colombia (which claims by then it will be ready), Argentina/Uruguay and England (with perhaps the same joint bids from Europe we saw in 2018). Perhaps you are right and FIFA will follow the IOC and not designate the original host as the host of the Centennial. Maybe it will go to England the origin of the sport.

Edited by Lord David

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Well, FIFA does things in a funny way. Back in 1966, they picked the hosts for 1974, 1978 and 1982. And then in 1974 they ratified Colombia as host for the 1986 tournament. All of these well over a decade and some of them in 'shaky' countries...that's a lot of time and a lot can happen. And in some, a lot did! The IOC only plans things out 6 or 7 years ahead of time. Imagine if in 1980 they picked Moscow and Sarajevo for the 1992 Games?

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The Canadian Soccer Association (CSA) released their Strategic Plan for 2014-2018 and Canada will be bidding for the 2026 FIFA World Cup.

While our international prominence in the women’s game has made significant inroads in the last several years, our men’s program needs further investment and commitment so that we reach new heights in the global game. Hosting one of the
most prestigious sporting events in the world will act as a catalyst for the growth of soccer in our country
3.4 Successfully prepare and submit a bid to host the 2026 FIFA World Cup.

http://www.canadasoccer.com/files/CanadaSoccer_StrategicPlan2014_2018_EN.pdf

I really haven't paid attention to the World Cup bidding process over the past few cycles besides hearing of the corruption behind Qatar winning. But do we Canadian stand a great chance at winning them in 2026? Is the Concacaf region due to host for that year?

Edited by dave199
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http://www.cbc.ca/sports/soccer/canada-to-bid-for-2026-fifa-world-cup-1.2508176

Canada to bid for 2026 FIFA World Cup
Canadian men's team currently ranked 111th

The Canadian Press Posted: Jan 23, 2014 11:56 AM ET Last Updated: Jan 23, 2014 2:47 PM ET

canada-soccer-03403326.jpg

The Canadian men's soccer team's lone World Cup participation was in 1986. The Canadian Soccer Association is planning to bid for the 2026 tournament. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press/File)

The Canadian Soccer Association released its 2014-18 strategic plan Thursday, with an eye on a huge prize further down the line.

Hosting the 2026 FIFA World Cup.

"The process has to start now," CSA president Victor Montagliani said Thursday of a bid to stage "the grand-daddy of them all."

Brazil is hosting the men's World Cup this summer, with Russia (2018) and Qatar (2022) in the wings. A 2026 bid would probably have to be filed around 2018.

Canada is hosting the women's World Cup next year. Getting that right is key to being able to giving the men's tournament a shot.

CONCACAF, which covers North and Central America and the Caribbean, has not hosted the men's World Cup since the U.S. in 1994.

"We're the only G-8 nation to not host the World Cup," Montagliani added. "We've hosted almost every other event. I think it's time for Canada to step up to the plate."

By next year, Canada will have hosted every FIFA event except for the world futsal, beach and club championships and Confederations Cup.

Montagliani says the World Cup bid is part of the new blueprint's strategy to encourage growth in the game in Canada.

Ranked 111th

Such a bid goes hand in hand with reviving a national men's team that currently ranks 111th in the world, sandwiched between Bahrain and Guatemala.

While the Canadian women turned heads with a bronze medal at the 2010 Olympics, the men have not won since being knocked out of World Cup qualifying in a 8-1 humiliation in Honduras in October 2012.

A 2-0 loss in Slovenia last November stretched the Canadian men's winless streak to 14 games. Canada is 0-11-3 over the streak and hasn't scored in 10 games. The winless run has seen the Canadian men outscored 27-2.

Canada has not won since a 3-0 World Cup qualifying victory over Cuba in Toronto four days before the Honduras debacle.

In the national team's defence, Canada has played tough opposition in Australia, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Japan, Mexico, Panama, Slovenia and the U.S.

And coach Benito Floro has looked to young talent since taking over the squad last summer.

Montagliani pointed to the U.S. successful bid for the '94 World Cup.

"When they bid for the World Cup, I wouldn't say the game was in a healthy state in the U.S. both professionally and domestically. Their leadership group decided to put a bid together and I think that was a bit of a lightning rod for people to come together."

A World Cup bid would require eight to 12 stadiums with 10 the optimum, according to CSA general secretary Peter Montopoli. All would have to accommodate at least 40,000 with more for the venue for the final.

Questions about artificial surfaces

The CFL's recent trend towards new stadiums and plans to revamp BMO Field in Toronto help the CSA cause although much work would remain, not to mention questions about artificial surfaces.

"There are a lot of requirements from a hosting perspective for a men's World Cup," Montopoli acknowledged. "It's massive."

FIFA, CONCACAF and the federal sport minister are aware of the CSA's intentions, he added.

"We have been trying to get to the prime minister. He's busy. But we will be getting to the prime minister on this file."

CONCACAF seems on board, tweeting its congratulations on the CSA's "ambitious new strategic plan."

A bid to co-host the World Cup was possible, with the subject already having been raised with U.S. Soccer, Montopoli said.

With FIFA yet to issue its 2026 hosting guidelines, Montopoli said talk of a co-hosted bid "might be a little premature but it certainly is possible."

The CSA's 2014-18 blueprint is titled "Leading a Soccer Nation." It is a pithy document divided into four goals with 27 sub-points.

The four major goals are:

  • Invest in technical leadership.
  • Ensure consistent world-class performances by our national teams.
  • Govern the game in Canada professionally.
  • Encourage and oversee the grown of the game.

The CSA plan also calls for mandating technical development across the country and establishing a national player database.

Strategic plans

The strategic plan was 18 months in the making with input coming from town hall meetings and an online survey (which got 3,000 responses).

It also involved looking at the strategic plans of other sports in Canada including hockey, figure skating, volleyball and golf, as well as foreign soccer organizations from the U.S. and England to Mexico and the Netherlands.

"Because we believe there was no point in re-inventing the wheel here," said Nick Bontis, director and chair of the CSA's strategic committee.

Changes in CSA governance have made the association better able to institute its policies. The makeup of the CSA board is no longer made up of regional interests, with the emphasis on skill set rather than geography.

Bontis says the new strategic plan will pay immediate dividends.

"We've never historically necessitated a certain behaviour by our provincial associations," said Bontis. "This strat [strategic] plan is the opposite. It necessitates certain behaviours."

That includes provincial governance reform, investment in technical leadership and mandating provincial strategic plans.

"Historically it was 10 different countries writing their own strat plans, their own technical plans, moving forward and somehow — in some sort of magical way, Abracadabra — the CSA was supposed to co-ordinate 10 national plans. That is something that needs to go away in the short-term."

Bontis will be front and centre in the CSA's plan to create a national player database, allowing it to better leverage its 850,000-plus registered players.

"We are in the year 2014 and we are archaic," he said. "It's an embarrassment how we register players across the country."

"Harvesting a million registrants will have fundamental changes in the way we do business in soccer in Canada," he added.

Players currently register with their local club, with the information and accompanying fees eventually flowing to the district and then the province and then the CSA.

Bontis's goal is for players to register nationally online, establishing a connection directly with the national program.

Canada Soccer previously prepared a hosting bid for the 1986 FIFA World Cup, which was originally awarded to Colombia but then went to Mexico. That tournament marks Canada's lone participation in the event.

Canada hosted the FIFA U-17 World Cup in 1987 (then known as the FIFA U-16 World Tournament), the U-20 Women's World Cup in 2002 and the U-20 World Cup in 2007.

This summer will see another edition of the U-20 Women's World Cup in Canada with the Women's World Cup to follow in 2015.

© The Canadian Press, 2014

Edited by dave199

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It will be interesting to see how Canada will figure out it's stadia dilemma. It's obvious that new stadiums would need to be built in Calgary and Halifax. There will be a showpiece 80,000 stadium in Toronto. Montreal's Olympic Stadium would get the biggest makeover since it's opening. BC Place would most likely receive more renos. Outside of this group, the stadiums are lacklustre and can only be expanded to a maximum of 40,000 such as Investor's Group Field in Winnipeg, and Tim Hortons Field which is currently under construction in Hamilton and once again the stadiums are nothing special. Then you have Ottawa who is currently renovating TD Place Stadium for their CFL team and capacity is only 24,000. I'm not sure if it can be fully expanded to 40,000 and like I've said about the other stadiums, there's nothing really special about this one too. It looks like Toronto could serve as host up to 3 stadiums. BMO Field is already in talks to be expanded to 40,000 and then you have the Rogers Centre.

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