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Glasgow 2014: Thousands to miss out on seeing Bolt

by MARTYN MCLAUGHLIN
Published on the 30 September 2013 00:00
TENS of thousands of people who applied for tickets to the men’s 100-metre final and the track cycling events during next year’s Commonwealth Games will be left disappointed after organisers revealed they had been swamped by the demand.
Spectators hoping to witness sporting history in Glasgow will find out from today if their applications for tickets to next year’s Games were successful.
With more than two million requests for seats at the spectacle, officials behind the Games have been delighted with the scale of interest. Demand has by far exceeded supply, meaning that some hopeful spectators will miss out come next summer.
Flagship events such as the men’s 100-metre final at Hampden Park on 28 July have proved the greatest draw of them all, with in excess of 100,000 applications made in the hope of seeing Jamaican track star Usain Bolt run in a stadium with a capacity of just over 50,000.
Another hugely popular event is the track cycling, being held over four days at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome from 24 July.
Organisers said they had received 25 times more requests from sports followers than the number of tickets available.
In all, during the four-week allotted window, there were 2.3 million requests received for up to one million tickets.
With the deadline for applications having drawn to a close earlier this month, sports fans have been forced to bide their time before learning if they will be able to watch some of the 17 sports on offer first hand.
From this afternoon, organisers will start to contact people who applied to watch some of the world-class competition, breaking either good news or bad.
Ty Speer, the deputy chief executive of Glasgow 2014, said the interest shown during the initial ticketing phase was a sign that attendances would be “tremendous”.
He added: “I’d also like to remind everyone who has applied for the exclusive on-sale period they will have first opportunity on all remaining tickets.”
Successful applicants are asked to ensure they have enough money in their nominated accounts to cover the costs of the tickets. Glasgow 2014 will begin taking payments from 1 October. For all failed payments, a second attempt will be made and should payment fail again, people will be contacted via e-mail asking them to call the contact centre.
Around 4,500 athletes are due to take part in Glasgow 2014, which is being held between 23 July and 3 August.
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The organizing team should have taken into account sensitive dates like this one, be it religious, civic, rememberance days or whatever special occasion. It seems Glasgow messed this one.

I incline to the Baron's interpretation- the actual date of the festival should be the 10th day of the month of As'vina, which equates in 2013 to 14 October, by which time the Baton will have moved on to Bangladesh, having arrived in India on 11 October.

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I incline to the Baron's interpretation- the actual date of the festival should be the 10th day of the month of As'vina, which equates in 2013 to 14 October, by which time the Baton will have moved on to Bangladesh, having arrived in India on 11 October.

However- it turns out that there are two different methods of calculating the date of Dussehra, one which uses only the basic principle (10th of the lunar month) and another which also takes into account whether the astrological conditions (Muhurat) on the 10th of the lunar month are favourable. In 2013, the Muhurat is much more favourable one day earlier (13 October in the Western calendar).

Indian reports also emphasise the wider context of the Durga Puja festival, which runs over several days leading up to Dussehra, "Most of the security apparatus will be deployed for the Durga Puja festivals". However, I'd have thought that shouldn't prevent the Baton Relay from blending in with the wider celebrations.

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Didn't Africa had enough screwing up one Commonwealth Games in Scotland already? I can't believe how immature and stuck in the past are some of their presidents sometimes...


Then again, what can you expect of a president who has publicly said stuff like gays should be executed and that he has the cure to AIDS

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Didn't Africa had enough screwing up one Commonwealth Games in Scotland already? I can't believe how immature and stuck in the past are some of their presidents sometimes...

Then again, what can you expect of a president who has publicly said stuff like gays should be executed and that he has the cure to AIDS

The gays and AIDS thing is a bit ridiculous - but it is a VERY valid reason to leave the Commonwealth - it is a neocolonial structure. That carries with it a whole lot of baggage. Frankly, I'm surprised more African nations have not resigned.

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The gays and AIDS thing is a bit ridiculous - but it is a VERY valid reason to leave the Commonwealth - it is a neocolonial structure. That carries with it a whole lot of baggage. Frankly, I'm surprised more African nations have not resigned.

The Commonwealth is neocolonial (as opposed to postcolonial) only to the extent that it tries to comply with concepts promoted by the United Nations, which often have their origins in West European political philosophies. Other than that, the Commonwealth ethos has always been what the name implies- sharing, with no one nation dominant.

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The Commonwealth is neocolonial (as opposed to postcolonial) only to the extent that it tries to comply with concepts promoted by the United Nations, which often have their origins in West European political philosophies. Other than that, the Commonwealth ethos has always been what the name implies- sharing, with no one nation dominant.

Someone might wanna tell Australia that...

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The Commonwealth is neocolonial (as opposed to postcolonial) only to the extent that it tries to comply with concepts promoted by the United Nations, which often have their origins in West European political philosophies. Other than that, the Commonwealth ethos has always been what the name implies- sharing, with no one nation dominant.

That sounds good on paper - but in practice these things are not executed this way and the paternal undertone still exists, and several nations (eg/ Britain and its closest cultural offsprings, Australia, Canada et al.) are dominant. This could even be represented by the cycle of CwG hosts which reflect the stark difference between the have and have nots of the union.

Someone might wanna tell Australia that...

Tell us what?

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the paternal undertone still exists, and several nations (eg/ Britain and its closest cultural offsprings, Australia, Canada et al.) are dominant. This could even be represented by the cycle of CwG hosts which reflect the stark difference between the have and have nots of the union.

Alexjc, on 04 Oct 2013 - 5:45 PM, said:snapback.png

Someone might wanna tell Australia that...

Tell us what?

I think that, although nations such as Australia may throw their weight around, the non-"closest cultural offsprings" in the Commonwealth don't really let them get away with it at meetings.

The cycle of CWG hosts is a different matter. As with the Olympics, real money needs to be spent, and for many nations that is in short supply.

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There is every chance that Australia will host the CWGs every third cycle, the simple reason is we get all excited, line up to the edge of the high dive, and then chicken out when we look down and see the huge pool of $$$ waiting to be splashed into to pay for the event.

Canada and NZ seem to back out most poften than not and South Africa is still reluctant.

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I think that, although nations such as Australia may throw their weight around, the non-"closest cultural offsprings" in the Commonwealth don't really let them get away with it at meetings.

The cycle of CWG hosts is a different matter. As with the Olympics, real money needs to be spent, and for many nations that is in short supply.

Firstly - how does Australia throw its weight around at Commonwealth meetings? Can you provide specific examples? And how to other Commonwealth nations not let it get away with it? I'm perplexed. With the increasing fixation on Australian republicanism and a diversion of attention toward the Asian community (Commonwealth or not) I find this a very specific interpretation of our foreign relations.

Further, I feel you are missing my point in regards to how former conquerers became the new soft and paternalistic guardians - namely the UK itself. To put it lightly your country (and mine, by my British descent) embarked on a global expansion campaign that has left horrifying and disturbing legacies in parts of the world. Back to my original point - can you really blame many nations from coming to the consensus that the Commonwealth of Nations/CHOGM is really a worthwhile venture for them? You mention it attempts to mirror UN conduct - why not just use the UN itself. Is the C'wealth itself even necessary, if not just the last dying gasp of air of British colonial influence?

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There is every chance that Australia will host the CWGs every third cycle, the simple reason is we get all excited, line up to the edge of the high dive, and then chicken out when we look down and see the huge pool of $$$ waiting to be splashed into to pay for the event.

Canada and NZ seem to back out most poften than not and South Africa is still reluctant.

While I'm not thrilled to see the CwG back in Australia so soon, it is a bit rich to claim that we are "putting off" Canada and NZ from bidding. If Canada or NZ (or indeed South Africa or anywhere else substantial) had tabled only so much as an average bid for 2018 - they would have won it. Gold Coast simply won because it was an average bid that was going against a supremely subpar bid from Hambantota - a shonky masterplanned community by a decrepit port on the southern coast of Sri Lanka. Hell - even if Sri Lanka had put forward Colombo it probably would have won. In the aftermath of the Delhi saga, can you really blame the CGF for coming back to Australia? We've never failed them in our staging of the CwG, all four have been well executed, and they knew we'd just get the job done in 2018.

Furthermore - your suggestion that Australia will host every third, I'm actually not too sure about that. But I do know the federal government would probably back out of commitment if another rose after 2018 - it could happen as a state funded venture. Anyway, as long as there are no viable alternatives, and Australia tables a bid, what exactly is so wrong with Australia hosting again? Arguably if it weren't for us the 2018 Commonwealth Games could very likely not have happened.

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And yet we see the likes of Mozambique and Rwanda, who never had any British overlords, still find it attractive enough to ant to join in.

It's really just another international grouping now, and like any such grouping, from ASEAN to APEC to G20 to the whatever the Francophonie group is named, it's value is that it's a forum where members can engage and network with each other. I don't see that it's ever been a celebration of pukka colonial values, at least not for a very long time – it certainly WOULDN'T survive if it was. And indeed at its best has been a valuable agency in spearheading campaigns such as the fight against Apartheid (against Maggie Thatcher's opposition, no less).

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