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ESPN 30 for 30

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Friendly reminder: The Prince of Pennsylvania premieres tomorrow night on ESPN at 8pm US/Canada time on the turbulent relationship between the multimillionaire John du Pont and Olympic wrestlers Dave and Mark Schultz that turned tragic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAjl1V1aGxE

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ESPN will a brand new 30 For 30 on the early to mid-1990s era Orlando Magic, one of the more entertaining and compelling NBA teams from that era with legitimate NBA championship aspirations. You know, that had Atlanta 1996 USA gold-medal basketball Olympians Shaquille O'Neal and Anfernee "Penny" Hardaway as the team's stars, who also serve as producers for this as-yet-untitled documentary to premiere in April directed by The 99ers' Erin Leyden, who produced 16 of them. So you know it will be in good hands. Even now this era of the Magic still captivates even walking away with no NBA title. The 1996 NBA offseason will get touched on when Shaq left for LA as expected and likely the Atlanta Olympics as teammates for the final time with the then-present strains between the two after Shaq left Orlando. More like a footnote in the larger Michael Jordan-dominant NBA story landscape back then. More in the sense of a tragedy. To this day, Orlando remains as a franchise with no championships:

http://orlandomagicdaily.com/2016/01/07/espn-films-announces-1990s-orlando-magic-30-for-30/

Jonathan Abrams wrote an oral history on the 1990s Orlando Magic for the sadly now-defunct Grantland. You can read it to whet your appetite:

http://grantland.com/1990s-orlando-magic-oral-history/

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If ESPN Australia/NZ made its own indigenious version of 30 For 30 (and it should--there's plenty of worthy Antipodean sports stories and profiles to look back on), the incredible story of the Socceroos finally making it to the World Cup after 32 years in the wilderness and painfully crashing at the final hurdle would definitely be a shoo-in as an entry. Alas, FOX Sports Australia beat it to it for this one largely about November 16, 2005 (title is November 16) when the Socceroos finally did it and went back to Germany incidentally in its last game as an OFC member beating Uruguay on that magic night down in Sydney at Stadium Australia, interspersed with past heartbreaks like against Iran based on showing past Socceroos jerseys from those ill-fated post-1974 World Cup campaigns. Several Socceroos happened to be Olyroos not long before like Viduka, Lazaridis, Neill, Bresciano, Culina, and Grella. It's done in a different way than already made previously. You'll also notice at the very beginning with Australian TV, it shows the rating before showing the program like on premium cable TV networks. Rarely that happens in the US and Canada for sports programming with ours but it happens. Hasn't happened with ESPN 30 For 30s:

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Trailer for the upcoming ESPN 30 For 30 This Magic Moment, about the cautionary fairy tale era of the 1992-97 Orlando Magic starring (also 1996 Olympic teammates) newly-Hall of Famer Shaquille O'Neal and Anfernee "Penny" Hardaway and how those two took hold of the pop culture scene, premiering Thursday, April 15. Orlando, even with its 2009 NBA Finals appearance where they actually went one better in terms of wins (that is, that Dwight Howard-led team won one game in it), hasn't really been the same since 1996

I Hate Christian Laettner and Of Miracles and Men were among the three ESPN 30 For 30s that are nominated for a Sports Emmy for Best Sports Documentary (The Four Falls Of Buffalo about the Buffalo Bills 4 consecutive trips to the Super Bowl from 1991-1994, each and every one coming up short, is the other) with HBO's Greg Louganis documentary Back On Board. Winner will be named May 10:

http://talkintv.buffalonews.com/2016/04/01/four-falls-buffalo-competing-christian-laettner-documentary-sports-emmy/

Preview for that aforementioned and Emmy nominated HBO documentary Back On Board: Greg Louganis that first hit back in August

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A potentially really good future ESPN 30 For 30 that's Olympic-related would no doubt be the 1980 US Olympic boycott and how it impacted not just the athletes who wanted to go and worked hard but also how NBC scrapped coverage plans. It can also touch on how other nations like Britain, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea, West Germany, and many Latin American and Muslim nations mulled over and some actually did join the boycott. Its emotional heart however, I think, should be the US and Canadian Olympians who never ever got an opportunity to be on a future Olympic team for one reason or another (missed qualification, injury, turning pro, simple discouragement, life changes, viewed as not ready) and they can express their recollections and how they feel about the boycott now. Many have diverse feelings on the matter with disappointment as the only common link. I can understand some of the could've been Olympians still won't talk about it. Did read the book Boycott on the US actions. Would like to read Lisa Forrest's version about Australia's attempts that the author herself was surrounded by and ultimately competed in as a 16-year old swimming co-captain.

Noticed on Amazon there's eventually another book on the US boycott that's more critical called Dropping the Torch, which I have yet to read that was published in 2010. Boycott's co-authors are the Caraccioli brothers with strong ties to TV and perhaps pitched the idea. So maybe have they nabbed a director to help create it? If so, hope it's becoming a reality and be very good.

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ESPN's 30 For 30 documentary Of Miracles And Men on the Soviet side of the Miracle On Ice, centering on Viacheslav Fetisov's return to the Lake Placid crime scene with his daughter Anastasia and narrated by Jeff Daniels, wins a Sports Emmy earlier this month for Oustanding Long Form Sports Documentary:

http://espnmediazone.com/us/press-releases/2016/05/espn-deportes-wins-two-sports-emmy-awards-espn-deportes-gana-dos-premios-emmy-de-deportes/

Fetisov kinda danced around what his coach's reaction afterwards or was vague about it in the doc aside from "miscalculating" his tactics in wanting to show he was the boss. After that incredible game in Lake Placid the US college kids upset, hardline technocratic Soviet coach Viktor Tikhonov, from Wayne Coffey's 2005 ebook The Boys Of Winter, in their locker room blasted his first-stringers legendary goalie Vladislav Tretiak, Valeri Kharmalov, Vladimir Petrov, and captain Boris Mikhailov--legends all--angrily saying to each of them, "This is your loss!", fearful the Soviet machine would lose gold and its international grip. Two days afterward the Soviets soundly beat Sweden 9-2 in their final round robin medal round game, but the Americans still had to beat Finland to claim gold because, if not, the Soviets would win it anyway. The Soviets were so upset after losing to the Americans that, upon getting silver, they refused to turn in their silver medals for the customary name engraving. The Miracle on Ice stunned the Soviets, the public, the state government, and the news media alike--Soviet politicians even wanted to kill the players. Tikhonov later admitted pulling the great Tretiak in goal with backup Vladimir Myshkin that shocked both sides as "the biggest mistake of my career" and a "game turning point". Mind you, the game was shown live on TV CCCP late night and early morning at 1am Moscow/Leningrad (now again St. Petersburg) time . Even with all this the Soviets still prevailed as the premier and dominant international ice hockey power for several more years since until the 1991 political breakup

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/hockey/soviet-union-reliving-miracle-ice-nightmare-article-1.2120861

An interesting retrospective on the Miracle On Ice from a couple of Americans being in Moscow, including one with plans to teach Russian, during the heightened Cold War tensions. Even the Soviets weren't hostile to the Americans, who surely were happy:

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Olympics/Olympics-blog/2010/0226/1980-miracle-on-ice-an-American-in-Moscow-recalls-Soviet-reaction

http://legalinsurrection.com/2016/02/my-experience-in-moscow-when-the-miracle-on-ice-happened/

The Lake Placid Olympic Ice Arena now has, as you'll notice as Fetisov dad and daughter go in, plaques commemorating the Miracle On Ice in key areas. It's also since added Herb Brooks' name to it in honor of the late USA coach.

Sad that goalie Jim Craig is now auctioning off his Lake Placid items to pay for some costs. Either they eventually go to a museum or be returned to him after paying:

http://olympics.nbcsports.com/2016/05/17/jim-craig-miracle-on-ice-auction-olympics/

Also, there's going to be an ESPN 30 For 30 on the Houston Cougars' Phi Slamma Jamma era starring future Dream Teamers and Houston Rockets 1995 championship teammates Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde "The Glide" Drexler coming in October:

http://www.chron.com/sports/cougars/article/UH-s-iconic-Phi-Slama-Jama-teams-to-be-profiled-7218742.php

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Surely we remember this other infamous moment from Seoul 1988 along with Ben Johnson's 9.79....

What you just saw, for those who aren't familiar, is the basis of a Spike Lee ESPN 30 For 30 Lil' Joint entitled 86-32, also another title over a Seoul controversy involving numbers (what a coincidence) with the reference to the punch landing count in the gold medal match, 28 years after what happened to Roy Jones Jr., who surely won the light middleweight gold and deserved it, against South Korean boxer from Busan Park Si Hun, who certainly didn't and says so immediately afterwards and since. Dr. Ferdie Pacheco was precient in declaring that "something being rotten in Korea" with Marv Albert saying a moment earlier "no question that Jones won but you never know". Undoubtably, it was the most glaring and egregious episode in that year's Olympic boxing in Seoul that witnessed a whole host of situations from Byun Jun Il and subsequent mini riot involving the NZ ref Keith Walker, who immediately flew back to New Zealand with fears of his safety, with the Byun's 1-hour sit-in protest with the lights turned off and the mysteriously wrong bus scheduling causing American boxer Anthony Hembrick to arrive late to the Olympic boxing venue and was disqualified from his first bout coincidently against a South Korean. No doubt it was shameful and "stolen" to quote Albert again. But controversy and Olympic boxing is nothing new. Jones, with hopes of drawing the public towards him after he turned pro possessing a gold medal with a successful career later, admits he should've done better in retrospect with his execution, but punch and land count overwhelmingly favored him. He spotted the judging mulling over their ultimate decision once the bout was over and knew they would side with the South Korean. If I recall correctly, David Wallenchinsky wrote in writing about this controversy about SI's reporting of bribery and corruption involving South Korea and their boxers and the judges back in Los Angeles with vows to return the favor four years later by rewarding a South Korean boxer with gold regardless of weight class. Park, it should be pointed out, was completely innocent of all this chicanery and was a victim of circumstance. Did earn indeed his way to get there with Roy Jones Jr. after beating some of the best their class, though. Gets lost. Perhaps because of the shame surrounding this, Park Si Hun never turned pro and retired after this. He's now South Korea's nation boxing team's coach and vow to have his boxers compete fairly and legitimately. One thing that did jump at me deals with the judges coming from Uganda, Morocco, and Uruguay voting for Park. Two of them got banned for life after all 3 got six months. Have to wonder there was at least some unconscious bias regarding the USA to them with the lingering Cold War legacy and some surrogate "take that USA" going on. The Moroccan judges says however he'd vote the South Korean to save embarrassment for that he was convinced his colleagues would vote for Roy. Nope. 

Those who follow South Korean sports may view all this, South Korea's World Cup wins as co-hosts in 2002 (especially against Italy and Spain) despite never winning previously a game there as karma for later Kim Yu Na not winning gold in Sochi (she deserve to win it) and Kim Dong Sam getting disqualified in Salt Lake City short track. What goes around come around, perhaps. We can also perhaps predict there will be some controversy in Pyongchang in two years' time involving South Korean athletes. With other Olympic controversies like Sylvie Frechette and Sale-Pelletier corrected with them receiving golds after judging errors, you would presume Jones Jr. was have his to right his wrong after the judges got banned. Nope. The IOC has no plans to change this unjust result. Shame. He deserves that gold. Obviously with the lack of access the rights to the Olympic video footage, animation and photos get used in lieu of them.

 

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Two additional ESPN 30 For 30 shorts centering on two widely-remembered Olympian icons to bring to you, among the elite of the greats. First is Greg Louganis' Thicker Than Water about the great Olympic diver Greg's struggle being both gay and HIV-positive in the 1980s at a time when people were still scared to death about HIV/AIDS and its potential spread while he was repeating his double gold in the platform and springboard in Seoul, South Korea under immense pressure. Not many knew of his condition and his sexual orientation back then until several years later of course--and of his round-the-clock consumption of the toxic AZT, the first AIDS drug. Partly based on fear that his "safe place" get taken away from him and being deported from South Korea with his AIDS status. That, and the recalling his crashing with his coach Ron O'Brien on the springboard in competition, which the American sports media jumped on a bit. All of which recount those excruciating days. HBO also did a longer doc on him, which I posted a trailer of. If uploaded already, I'll do it 

As someone who is beloved the world over since her legendary perfect 10 40 years ago as a 14-year old and considering how her life is well-chronicled, the disappointing thing about Nadia Comeneci, who never anticipated making history there, is that this one is not feature-length. Katie Holmes directs this short called Eternal Princess (Printesa Vesnica in Nadia's native Romanian), which the optics uses the Romanian pronounciation accents with Romanian names and words. She's got seven 10s overall in the Olympics) Did see the syndicated 1985 made-for-TV movie Nadia. Surely it's a long way from Bucharest, Romania (when it was a closed Communist nation under Nicolae Ceausescu with her off-gym time and movement severely restricted) to Norman, Oklahoma after all these years. In her book, Letters to a Young Gymnast, Nadia tells of wounding up working at a Communist, state-owned department store after her competition days were through in 1984 (prior to Los Angeles and of Romania being a Warsaw Pact nation defying the Soviets with this Olympic appearance. Was there in LA) for several years. Bela left to defect for America. Nadia grew progressively restless yearning for freedom prompting her daring November 1989 escape from Romania to Hungary/Austria and ultimately to America and then Montreal, Quebec to leave her family behind when it was cold and dark two weeks prior to the fall of Ceausescu and the Timisoara massacre. Her English was still halty at the time. Then came the relationship and eventual marriage with fellow gymnast Bart Conner that saw their 1996 wedding conducted back home in Bucharest, Romania that was televised with a son born 10 years later: 

 

 

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Really nice announcement at SXSW that ESPN Audio and ESPN Films are expanding its ESPN 30 For 30 juggernauts into the extremely popular world of longform podcasts beginning in June. And one of those first batch of stories slated is about American decathletes Dan O'Brien and Dave Johnson--you know, Dan and Dave---and the ill-fated 1992 Reebok "To Be Settled in Barcelona" Olympic campaign:

http://awfulannouncing.com/espn/espn-30-for-30-podcasts-debut-june.html

No Olympic-centric 30 For 30 was nominated for the Sports Emmys this year, unless you want to loosely count the sole doc from that in The 85 Bears that involved a former Olympic hopeful in sprinter Willie Gault:

 

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ESPN just put up ESPN 30 For 30 short on the late, great Cuban 3x gold medalist boxer Teofilo Stevenson, a symbol of the Cuban Revolution and national hero. Loyal to Castro and his socialistic revolutionary ideals. This short is told through the lens of the USA-Cuban Cold War politics, how his life and the Cubans were impact by the American embargo, and how he was offered millions by American boxing promoters that included a proposed fight with Muhammad Ali that would take mythic preportions. Too bad Stevenson died well before this short was even in production in 2012. Had he lived, he'd be granted better access and contact with ESPN Films now that the current Cuban-American detente is going on but may soon chill a bit under the Trump Administration. Narrated by Public Enemy's Chuck D:

 

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ESPN's 30 For 30 first podcast is an Olympic story. The story of Dan O'Brien and Dave Johnson, two world class US decathletes who Reebok thrown into the maelstrom of celebrity and marketing in the famous "Dan and Dave" that one of them, Dan O'Brien, eventually of course no heighted in the pole vault. Thus costing him a chance to be with Dave Johnson in Barcelona to "settle" the argument. But what if Robert Zmelik won anyway?

 

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An upcoming ESPN 30 For 30 tomorrow will focus on Bobby Knight, the coach of the last gold medal-winning 1984 USA men's Olympic basketball team filled with just college stars, many of them legends. But this deals with his controversial end at the University of Indiana in 2000 after three NCAA titles (1976, 1981, 1987) and the reported mistreatment he heaped on his Indiana players before resurfacing at Texas Tech two year later. But what's interesting about this one lies in the fact this documentary will be exclusively on ESPN's newly launched online streaming service ESPN+ 

 

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Been very quiet on the 30 For 30 front these days, I know there has been some docs involving Olympians lately in other platforms like the podcasts. But surely not many out there save for being on the Olympic Channel. ESPN did just announce it will have an entire new batch of 30 For 30s. My concern lies in some may just be restricted to exclusively on ESPN+ and may end up being like the-tree-falling-in-the-forest-sound. This apparent tapering off may just be a one-off. Vice President and Executive Producer of ESPN Films and “30 for 30” Libby Geist says this year is just an outlier. Geist says there are at least 15 30 For 30s forthcoming in various stages of planning and production. Hopefully I wager at least one of them involves Olympian or the Olympics, but it's hard to tell since details of the subjects aren't yet forthcoming save for a Michael Jordan 10-hor one and a Deon Sanders self-inflicted leak on his. Geist projects the majority will make TV with one or two heading exclusively on ESPN+ in determining what goes where and using it as a draw to Plus, a top priority for ESPN right now:

http://awfulannouncing.com/espn/aa-qa-espns-libby-geist-outlines-the-future-of-30-for-30.html

http://thecomeback.com/espn/a-look-at-the-past-present-and-future-of-30-for-30-as-weve-hit-a-troubling-lull-for-the-series.html

There is actually one from the Olympian/Paralympian realm this year on ESPN+. Earlier this month though ESPN released on August 24 an inspiring short documentary on Paralympian swimmer Victoria Arlen who swam to a gold and two silvers in the London 2012 Paralympics was still determined to regain the use of her legs to walk after suffering an illness locking in her body and falling into a vegetative state from that starting from age 11 Got to compete in Dancing With The Stars:

https://espnmediazone.com/us/press-releases/2018/07/30-for-30-shorts-locked-in-documentary-on-victoria-arlen-to-premiere-august-3-on-espn/

 

 

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Five Rings Films presents the amazing story of the Argentinian men's basketball team taking gold and upsetting the favored Americans along the way in Athens 2004 called the Golden Generation for the Olympic Channel as an original documentary premiering worldwide on October 22. 14 years ago and right on the heels of Emmanuel Ginobili's retirement from basketball. Everyone on that team--Manu, Pepe Sanchez, Fabricio Oberto, Andreas Nocioni, Ruben Wolkowyski, Luis Scola, Gabriel Fernandez, Hugo Sconochini, Carlos Delfino, Leo Gutierrez, Walter Herrmann, Alejandro Montecchia, head coach Ruben Magnano, and former CABB President Mr. Muratore--were interviewed for this to remember that special time together. There was some talk during this time that the American Olympic dominance would end after this in the pro era, but that really didn't happen. Already had its premiere in Buenos Aires and was co-directed by Camilo Antolini and Oscar winner Juan Campanella:

http://www.fiba.basketball/news/fiba-president-muratore-attends-premiere-of-olympic-channel-documentary-on-argentinas-golden-generation

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Press release and further info for the documentary from the Olympic Channel can be found here. Plans for NBCSN in the USA and for Eurosport across much of Europe to broadcast The Golden Generation too:

https://www.olympicchannel.com/en/stories/news/detail/olympic-channel-five-rings-films-presents-the-golden-generation/?utm_source=instagram&utm_medium=inst-story&utm_campaign=bayog-owned_

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With all the retrospectives about the memorably highly politicized year that was 1968 going around everywhere in whatever media platform, NBC Sports presented the 1968: A Mexico City Documentary this week upon the 50th anniversary of that pivotal year amid the strong and heavy political backdrop worldwide when it seemed like the world was tearing apart. Narrated by Serena Williams, the centerpoint of course is the Tommie Smith-John Carlos Black Power salute on the medal podium that brought a furious backlash (and expulsion from the Olympic Village) and the black athlete boycott inspired from it with Australia's silver medalist Peter Norman supporting them. That moment since became iconic in civil rights still resonating. But there's also Dick Fosbury, Jim Ryan (often used as a White America counter against the emerging black athlete boycott), Vera Ceslavska's own medal podium protest over the August 21 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia crushing the Prague Spring sharing gold with Soviet gymnast Natalya Kuchinskaya (she turned her head during the Soviet anthem), Felipe Munoz's gold for Mexico in men's 200m breaststroke in the aftermath of the tragic Mexico City Tlatelolco massacre 10 days before the Opening Ceremony, Bob Beamon's Olympic record long jump that still stands as the OR, George Foreman heavyweight gold, and Lee Evans and his track teammates own subsequent protestand  being how hard it was for him while supporting the Black Panthers:  

 

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Getting a boost involving the Olympians on ESPN 30 For 30's installments. Olympic-related subject matter known: Florence Griffith-Joyner and Lance Armstrong, whose dates are TBA. There's plans for more topics that ESPN has yet to reveal for 2019-2020 and will be announced:

https://awfulannouncing.com/espn/espn-teases-new-30-for-30-films-on-lance-armstrong-dennis-rodman-michael-vick-among-others.html

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Get ready for some Canadian content actually coming very soon from Canada's TSN, ESPN answer up there. It's not really called 30 For 30 up there for its indigenous material, though it definitely does show those up there on the TSN channels. Yet there will be a 6-part Canadian sports documentary series installment starting February 6 originally started back in 2012 celebrating the 100th Grey Cup and the CFL’s indelible mark on Canadian history, not just in sports. This time, TSN's acclaimed Engraved On A Nation now takes the direction of telling intrinsic tales of how such Canadian people and moments shaping Canadian sports and national identity. Here stateside, the only Canadian 30 For 30 content dealt with have been Wayne Gretzky's blockbuster 1988 trade to the Los Angeles Kings from Edmonton and its impact, 9.79 with Ben Johnson's 100m gold medal (or so we thought at the time) race and the steroid controversy and aftermath back in Seoul 1988, and Into the Wind on Terry Fox's 1980 cross country run attempt raising money for cancer research co-produced by Steve Nash.

Engraved On A Nation in its series has two Olympic-themed documentaries in its series. And it kicks off on February 6 profiling sprinter Donovan Bailey in what you call a sequel of sorts to 9.79 and concludes on April 3 with the often-heated and intense Canada-USA women's hockey rivalry trading victories and medals while still being teammates, friends, and even couples off the international rink over the past nearly 30 years while looking at what fuels it in seeking total domination

https://www.tsn.ca/engraved

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HBO premieres Friday night a very important and devastating 90-minute documentary from filmmaker Erin Leigh Carr, daughter of the late New York Times media journalist (and certainly not to be confused with the retired Houston Texans QB) David Carr, on the deeply disturbing USA Gymnastics sex abuse scandal centering on the disgraced Dr. Larry Nasser as it also keeps its eye on the money and attain medals in a dehumanizing system and culture that get embraced where coaches act like this for medals and accolades prioritizing over the young gymnasts' safety. And how he was enabled to continue on with around 300+ of them over the years. At the end it doesn't matter if the likes of Bela and Marta Karolyi specifically knew about the sexual abuse incidents or the warnings--Nasser perhaps duped and manipulated them. But they had to have known about this with his multiple police interrogations while they were known to be abusive to their gymnasts themselves. You'll see Olympians Aly Raisman and Jordyn Wieber but they, based on the press reviews on the documentary, appear only from their court statement footage; the bigger and more notable names in the gymnastics and of those in power involved with and revolve around them. This is more from a different angle: on the comparatively anonymous young women Larissa Boyce, Trinea Gonczar, Isabel Hutchins, Jessica Ann Smith, Morgan McCaul, Taylor Livingston, Rachel Dellhollander, and the only coach willing to speak on-camera in Aimee Boorman who so memorably confronted Nassar during his January 2018 sentencing hearing in Lansing, Michigan. Carr supports all their stories and their access being told when they're ready but is intrigued in the under-reported portions. They too tell how Nasser played upon that culture abused and savagely betrayed their trust and boundaries under the guise of medical care. Not to mention this same culture disinclined to disregard the needs, concerns, and boundaries of women's own bodies when, here, they're expected to tough things out, never complain, and suffer in silence that's a by-product of one portion in Anglo-American culture. Even with the crumbling institutional structure and fallout from the USA Gymnastics scandal, coaches are still scared in speaking up for fear of losing their jobs, status, and access. The gymnasts too were afraid of speaking out and not being listened to under this culture of fear until later. Rather, Carr, saying this scandal "makes my blood boil", sets it all up in more of a forensic and investigative manner. You know, I flat out don't blame the father at all for wanting to charge and viciously assault at "this demon" in court:

You may assume ESPN may touch on this themselves since this is a major development. But usually for things like this, it wants to wait for some years when enough time passes. Regardless, this saga will NEVER end in whatever form for those who were forced to endure that even with Nasser permanently behind bars for there is a legacy to it.  

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/olympics/article/HBO-presents-another-view-of-the-USA-Gymnastics-13808621.php

https://www.bustle.com/p/will-larry-nassar-get-out-of-prison-at-the-heart-of-gold-examines-the-devastating-usa-gymnastics-case-17135629

https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2019/05/new-film-exposes-how-larry-nassar-was-able-abuse/588571/

 

 

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