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Durban Sandshark

London 2012 Olympic Media Updates

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knowing the results does not mean people won't watch. And especially if it's a prominent American, often times it will drive people to the telecast rather than scaring people off. I know the prevailing theory would be to show it live and in the moment, but if more people will watch on tape, then whose interests are they really serving.

Yeah, basically our approach here is the networks assume that for the prime-time highlights, everyone will pretty well know the results anyway. The drawcard the rights holders use then is "Tonight, we will have the first exclusive interview with our new Aussie Golden Girls, only on Seven" or whatever. And then pad the whole thing out with replay after replay of the event, the immediate post-event interview again and again (eg "You've just clocked the fastest 100m swim in the world, how do you feel?") and then numerous replays of the medal ceremony. I much prefer the live coverage as it happens - we don't get that fripperies and overkill then, just regular crosses across to what's happening at the various sports. And like I said, it's a great bonding and excitement experience to see everyone in the office take five minutes to crowd around the TV to watch a race final.

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Yeah, basically our approach here is the networks assume that for the prime-time highlights, everyone will pretty well know the results anyway. The drawcard the rights holders use then is "Tonight, we will have the first exclusive interview with our new Aussie Golden Girls, only on Seven" or whatever. And then pad the whole thing out with replay after replay of the event, the immediate post-event interview again and again (eg "You've just clocked the fastest 100m swim in the world, how do you feel?") and then numerous replays of the medal ceremony. I much prefer the live coverage as it happens - we don't get that fripperies and overkill then, just regular crosses across to what's happening at the various sports. And like I said, it's a great bonding and excitement experience to see everyone in the office take five minutes to crowd around the TV to watch a race final.

I've seen CBC do that before, especially when a Canadian has won gold. And this was largely in 1998 and 2000 where a lot of the best action was in the middle of the night. But that's not going to work here. If there's a big event in the middle of the afternoon, not that many people are going to watch. If primetime is filled with replays of that event (which by then it will have already aired), not that many people are going to watch that either.

What's great about this Olympics is that at least people will have a choice. If they want to watch it live, that's now an option. Me personally, I very much look forward to the afternoon of July 27th which I'm going to ask off from work so I can watch the Opening Ceremony live online (which I presume will be without any commentary) and then watch it again when it airs on TV, complete with everything that will be a part of the television broadcast. It's definitely a fair point about a group of people together in an office gathering together for an event, but I don't think that would happen in the same way here. And if it did, good luck trying to get people together to watch the primetime broadcast. That all said, let's see what having online coverage will do, because especially that so many events will be live during the afternoon, that could be beneficial to that type of office culture.

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Most Americans do not care enough about swimming or track to get up and watch a live final at 3am or take off work to watch a final at 1pm.

What a shame! That is what the Olympics is all about to me. Waking up in the early hours to watch sport you wouldn't normally watch. I have watched so many sports via the Olympics that I would never entertain watching at any other time. The fact it is late night or early in the morning just adds to it. Most of my favourite childhood memories are from being allowed to stay up extra late to watch a great British sporting achievement at the Olympics. Such as Torvill and Dean taking Gold at the winter Olympics or Tessa Sanderson taking Gold in the Javelin. I couldn't get excited about either of these sports any other time but the Olympics is special. Just hearing Chariots Of Fire makes me get all emotional.

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Quaker, where in the US do you live where you get to watch CBC?

I was in college at the time. My university's cable system brought in CBC from Montreal. Sadly, they pulled the channel midway through my senior year, but thankfully not before the Sydney Olympics that year (I was also there for Nagano in `98). Was definitely interesting to see the contrast between American coverage and Canadian coverage, especially from 2 Olympics on the other side of the planet where it didn't occur to CBS/NBC to show anything live in primetime save for a couple of events.

What a shame! That is what the Olympics is all about to me. Waking up in the early hours to watch sport you wouldn't normally watch. I have watched so many sports via the Olympics that I would never entertain watching at any other time. The fact it is late night or early in the morning just adds to it. Most of my favourite childhood memories are from being allowed to stay up extra late to watch a great British sporting achievement at the Olympics. Such as Torvill and Dean taking Gold at the winter Olympics or Tessa Sanderson taking Gold in the Javelin. I couldn't get excited about either of these sports any other time but the Olympics is special. Just hearing Chariots Of Fire makes me get all emotional.

Would that it could be like that in the United States, but it's not the case. During a Winter Olympics, you have the NFL season wrapping up here plus February is filled with basketball, college basketball, hockey, the beginning of the NASCAR season. And during the summer there's baseball, golf on the weekends (I'd like to see how that goes in 2016), more auto racing (contrast that with F-1 which has 1 race on the first Sunday of the Games this year, then nothing for the entire month of August). So as an American, the allure of sports you never see and athletes you've never heard isn't as strong as it's going to be as it is elsewhere where there's less going on and chances are, sports like athletics or swimming have at least gotten some attention. I'm totally with you that I don't follow these things on a regular basis, but I get extremely excited for the Olympics. But again, that's me. And the prevailing wisdom amongst the American television networks is that you can't show a major event on a weekday afternoon or in the middle of the night and expect it to reach critical mass by showing it live and then showing the replays in primetime.

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The simplest explanation is that the Olympics are not as big of a deal here as they are in many other countries. Michael Phelps may be a household name, but most Americans barely know what he does aside from a week every 4 years at the Olympics plus maybe another big meet here or there. As opposed to Australia where you follow the sport a lot more closely than we do here and would gather together for an Olympic final in the middle of a work day or late at night. Same thing for a sport like bobsled where the world championships are going on, in the United States no less. That's probably a big deal in a country like Germany, but not at all here. That an American won didn't even register on the American sports radar.

So when the Olympics comes along, it's sports and athletes that Americans largely aren't familiar with.

BIB1 - I'd disagree with that actually - and $4.3bn suggests NBC do as well. OK, maybe it is because of the NBC strategy but the Olympics usually provide a much bigger boost to NBC primetime and the likes of Australia than they do here in the UK on the BBC, even though our figures are healthy and I'm sure will be very healthy this summer.

As for the second part - I think that's the case world wide too. Historically outside of athletics everything has been rather unfamiliar here in the UK - though now athletics is probably more unfamiliar than the likes of swimming, cycling and rowing - though even then most would struggle to name more than one or two Brits in those sports - and beyond Michael Phelps and Usain Bolt many wouldn't be able to name the big stars coming to town either. Indeed considering myself a big Olympic Sport fan I'm struggling to think of names.

They report on the events American's win, and do medal counts, maybe send a reporter but other than that they ignore it mostly. No witholding results till primetime even if NBC withold the event coverage till primetime, even with that NBC will sometimes edit down events to only show the American and maybe the couple that are favored to place highly in the event.

I guess though NBC withhold results from their news coverage.

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Basketball isn't all that popular among the French-speaking portions of Quebec (NBA and college hoops weren't broadcast in French until this season). Mathieu Jolivet and Bernard Côté do college hoops on RDS; they will probably do the Olympics as well.

Women's boxing will air wherever they have room for it. Sportsnet and TSN will show some of it for sure. Canada has Mary Spencer, one of the best boxers in the world. I don't think you can read too much into the ads. CTV/TSN are trying to introduce Canadians to athletes they haven't heard of before.

I also don't think anyone of the channels except for CTV/TSN will show the I Believe promos. Even Sportsnet hasn't shown any yet. There are fractures in the consortium that weren't there in 2010. Outside of the 17 days of competition, the respective networks seem to be doing their own thing.

Sorry everyone, I've been very busy this month.

For the first part, indeed, basketball is not huge in Quebec--not quite part of the Quebec sports fabric though it does have its fans and participants. In an Australian basketball forum that I write too, I discuss largely in one of the threads about my thoughts on Montreal's lack of NBA prospects. But the NBA can be more of a status symbol for some cities instead of the capitalization of a strong local basketball heritage. The city has produced a handful but not a lot of the basketball talent that Toronto has--Ryan Gomes, Prosper Karangwa, Samuel Dalembert, Joel Anthony, Ron Crevier, and Mohamed Hachad. There isn't a strong basketball culture in Quebec. Its attempts at pro basketball is sporadic and not successful. Besides, RSEQ only has five schools participating in the CIS basketball competition--three are English ones (McGill, Concordia, and Bishop's) and two are French (UQAM and Laval). Quebec schools hardly ever win the CIS title, (aka the W. P. McGee Trophy); last time that happened was when Bishop's won it in 1998. As you indicated, RDS just now starting to give basketball some love though I expect the new TVA Sports doing that at the start. Jolivet and Cote are the most available for the French version of the family. I would be very interested in how RDS would cover NCAA March Madness with them and the men's and women's CIS Final 8--I know it's not as a big thing for Canadians as it is for us Americans. They likely would stay in Montreal and call the games there from a monitor.

Wouldn't be surprised to see Cabral "Cabbie" Richards to be a part of the Canadian media contingent having moved to TSN from the the Score almost a year ago. He could do the basketball coverage and offer a Cabbie On The Street for Olympians as a sideline reporter or do a lighter, more fun segment side of the Olympics. Hey, he might do a Cabbie with the London cabs segment! :)

I have discussed Mary Spencer here on this thread with the possibility of APTN covering her bouts since she is an Aboriginal Canadian along with CTV and TSN, as expected in the latter two. Also, I forgot to mention the last CTV London Olympics promo that I uploaded is the first one featuring Gordon Pinsent's voice. The RDS ones have yet to hit with legendary actor Pierre Labeau providing the French voiceover. I find it rather odd that Sportsnet, as much as a member of the consortium as CTV, TSN, and RDS are, apparently isn't doing any of them, let alone APTN, OMNI, and ATN dating back from Vancouver. It's unfortunate on their part. Guess Rogers Communications perceive it to be more of a Bell Media Canada affair in terms of promotion. Furthermore, there's supposed to be a Priscilla Lopes-Schleip Believe commercial that has already hit Canadian TV airwaves as mentioned on CTV Olympics' Facebook page, the first apparently involving a Canadian Summer Olympian.

Given that Canada tends to be more embracing of multiculturalism than Americans are (from my impressions), never mind the fact that we are much more so, it makes sense that the networks liike CTV would help promote and introduce more of the foriegn athletes for London 2012 that are unknown to them. Something NBC should do likewise for us south of the border in their promos (Hint, hint for my next post later today)...

Eight TV channels, 18 radio stations, and complementary and specific Olympic websites and teletexts that come from the four official languages from Switzerland's SSR/SRG (Swiss Broadcasting Corporation) group will descend into London in the form of a team of 130 strong to cover it for the Swiss. By now, all the TV channels--SF, TSR, TSI--should have HD capabilities on their own since Beijing instead of just sharing out on HD Suisse. HD Suisse, as the name suggests, is more for the French language on TSR's channels and just focus on what the French market could want. Or it could all the same coverage again with maybe the option to change the language audio on the remote like with the SAP where available on ours here in the US. They will each have their own studios, presenters/commentaters, and live interviews tailored with coverage favoring Swiss sthletes to the Swiss audiences. Is this actually the first time Romanisch will be a part of this, since I don't recall looking up at their websites for their Olympics webpages, let alone an Olympic TV and radio schedule?

http://www.houseofsw...orporation.html

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It has been a very interesting discussion here dealing with largely how those outside of the United States are perplexed with the manner of how NBC proper assembles its coverage and package of the Olympics whenever it's held outside of North America. Unfortunately, I have been working heavily so I wasn't able to jump in earlier than I would like to offer my thoughts. Fact is, I'm largely going to reiterate what was said by the likes of Quaker2001, BT, GoNutz, and Brekkie Boy with some new dimensions.

Without a doubt, how NBC does this for the anchor network by putting significant events and results on tape delay is a business matter structured for the most eyeball viewing during primetime to justify advertisers and the millions of dollars in the TV rights fees. This has roots in the fact that the USA is the only nation in the world to have commercial television and radio predating government-run/public (or government crown corporations like the BBC and CBC) television networks less than a century ago. Unlike the rest of the world, it didn't take decades for the public to rely on or consume commercial-free TV before the courts allowed private TV to exist. We don't have licensing renewal reminders or taxes on TV sets for the networks' revenue. It also boils down to habits based on the long-standing and proven viewing regiment that has been going for decades and what we Americans generally are accustomed to that also has to do with work and school dominating our daily lives. Most networks and its execs outside of the US that air the Olympics aren't as obssesively concerned with ratings and packaging things to suit desirable and broad demos.

As Sir Rols, Lee, and others point out, we Americans do tend to miss out on the communal aspects of coming together much through the Olympics and the spontatiety. With few one-off exceptions like the World Cup, Super Bowl, NCAA Final Four, and specific events in the Olympics when we go into bars, for example, we tend to watch more alone. See, the United States is more pro-"rugged individualist" in its psyche and less about the collective (and social equity) as it is in all other cultures. Isn't really possible or practical to watch TV during work hours like in the white collar world because of bosses' fears of production loss (note the Boss Button on NCAA March Madness On-Demand online), going back to the robust rendition of the Protestant work ethic, despite the fact American work production is still very high. Now, I can ID a nice amount of foriegn athletes in various sports and foriegn leagues because I can follow them more or less rigorously and possess the kind of curiousity to actively seek them out. It deepens your love, exposure, and appreciation of the sports, something that has been cultivated growing up for me like the NRL, AFL, J-League, DEL, V8, IPL, among others. Alas, people like me are in a small minority as far as the networks are concerned. It also reflects that personal isolationism from other nations and learning extensively about them. Most people don't the time or curiousity to do so. Go random find an American on the street and ask him or her in their knowledge of non-US athletes, you'll likely get more "umms..." and the like. The allure is not as there as it is elsewhere, maybe it's because we're still very young in our perspective. Even as we become more and more multicultural and multiethnic by the day, NBC will consequently in this case will hype Team USA to get many viewers as possible to their sports in the mainstream networks instead of doing more and balanced international TV coverage in them. But there are limits in that too.

I already recognize that some sports hold greater appeal in some areas of the world than others; it's a reason why we Americans like NASCAR more so than Indy/F1, why rugby is bigger in NZ than in the US, why track and field is bigger in Europe and Asia than in the US, and why badminton is bigger in Asia than in Latin America. Even in the anchor Olympic sports like swimming and track and field, where we produced a whole mountain range of Olympics legends in both sports, both male and female, and will continue to do so, they don't quite fully capture the mainstream attention because many of us will move on to something else that is more regular. Some sports, like women's soccer, are still marginal in the US. In other words, when the NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB, NASCAR, NCAA football and basketball, golf, tennis, and increasingly soccer and beach volleyball end up semingly acting like a cartel in the hearts and minds of the American sports public in terms of breath and depth for the regular sports year, Michael Phelps, for all his star power, will sometimes have difficulties generating mass attention from the pool in a non-Olympic year than he would if he were an Australian, where he'd be definitely royalty EVERY day out. We Americans still have to navigate our way through the clutter and must learn to familiarize. Again, it all boils down to our sports viewing habits, what we're accustomed to, and whether there is a genuine curiousity from us to know more about the sports we aren't familiar with outside of the Olympics (there won't be an overnight change, I'll tell you that). We're not as passionate about those other Olympic sports.

It does reflect a nice change from NBC to offer live online coverage as an alternative to TV since chances can be made on that medium and is still evolving. People who complain and yet watch anyway have no excuse on that front. Another reality stemming from the last few decades or so is that, with the proliferation of greater and diverse choices in TV channels on cable, the Olympics don't garner the level of tentpole attention to Americans as it did as late as, say, 1992-94, though it does gather strong TV audiences. And I plan to discuss more on all this later next week, like the NBC Olympic media embargo.

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The video's unfortunately blocked here in the US, so I can't see it for now.

That junior partner to the NBCU Olympic family--that is, no actual Olympic coverage on that network, Universal Sports, hooks up with the DISH Network today for a multiyear, multimedia platform deal for its varied stable of sports.

http://www.universal...sid=581194.html

Yes, the Today show will be at London during the Olympics like it did starting with Barcelona (if not Seoul). Same article reveals that the Rolling Stones and Faces were approached to be in for the London Olympics.

http://www.digitalsp...-for-today.html

British Telecom (BT), one of the London Olympics major corporate partners, sponsors the London Live Olympic entertainment with live screenings, sports, and concerts that will take place at both Victoria Park and Trafalgar Square:

http://www.brandrepu...ainment-events/

Gavin D. Hunt announces in at a Montreal Hyatt conference back in September how CTV will make the Internet coverage more feature-heavy, interactive, and social network friendly. It was complete to be sure with Vancouver than what was likely seen on the networks, where you get to see the 34th place finisher from Senegal on the slopes. ESPN3.com (now Watch ESPN) did something like this with what you on the screen with the 2010 FIFA World Cup coverage in South Africa after the game was over by putting in points of reference in the games like rosters, important plays, goals, yellow cards, red cards, and misses. What will Bell Media and Rogers Communications will offer is no different on that front and hopefully more when they're all announced.

In the interests of fairness for both official Canadian languages, this is the French address on the Canadian Olympic Broadcast Media Consortium's online plans in Montreal by Nathalie Lambert:

We surely discuss talk about TV, the Internet, cell/mobile phone, and sometimes radio Olympic coverage worldwide here on this thread, but let's not forget about the print mediums, the originators of the Olympic media coverage. Can't forget about them. I'm reminded of this when I thought back recently of one September 1988 Saturday at B. Dalton bookstore at Northwest Plaza, now a shell of its former glorious self due to demographic shifts, and spotted, though did not buy, a copy of the NBC Seoul 1988 Olympic Viewers's Guide. That would have hepled me get my coverage down to my interests, if needed. NBC had since published others with the help of a publishing company guides for Barcelona and Atlanta. Atlanta's was honestly the last one I ever saw, but a trip to eBay revealed that there were subsequent ones for Sydney, Athens, and Beijing. At the time, I presumed that, with the Olympics falling out of favor a bit in the US for TV unless they're held in North America despite still being a large tentpole TV event and shelling lots of money for the TV rights, they were never going to be published. Time will tell if there will be a London edition to that. Never saw the Winter Olympic counterparts or an ABC one for LA/Sarajevo or even CBS's for their Winter Olympic ones in 1992-98, so I can't comment on those if they actually existed.

Some of us here may recall that in 1988 Street and Smith's published a Seoul 1988 Olympic preview that stayed on the magazine stands for many months in that year. I, myself, bought a copy of that. I think this was the only time Street and Smith's ever did something like that for the Olympics. This was largely a Summer Olympics affair with each sport covered, some sports more so than others judging by the amount of pages it gets (even the demostration sports), with a strong angle towards of course the US Olympians that were in it. Unfortunately, like with computers when they hit the market and science textbook editions, that magazine was dated somewhat, especially in comparison with what SI would publish several months later. Some of the Olympians profiled on it actually didn't make the 1988 US Olympic team like Pablo Morales. It was so outdated, Madagascar hadn't yet announced it was joining the boycott with North Korea, Ethiopia, Cuba, Nicaragua, Albania, and the Seychelles. Outside of Sports Illustrated, which can make one quick and more recently and has a strong reach, history, and reknown/rep worldwide, the time for Olympic print previews as magazines have past thanks to the Internet, where you can get info and stories faster. Don't forget, it did daily mags just for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics as a major worldwide sponsor then. ESPN The Magazine could do it too, but as a bi-weekly, it does seemingly theme issues as a hook to distinguish themselves from SI and only does olympic stuff in a one-pager--though it previously has done Olympic issues. Don't know for sure what will Sportsnet magazine do in Canada as far as their Olympic plans are in publishing; there will be something, we know, as part of the Canadian Olympic Media Consortium--would like to see how they would cover the Olympics. Then again, we may see app-only or web-only magazines doing the Olympic previews now and into the future. You're free to mention about them all here too about many sports magazine worldwide doing this.

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France Televisions releases its advertisers' press kit promoting the networks' exclusive coverage and plans for the 2012 London Olympics. Yes, this reveals what their programming plans are for it:

http://www.ftv-publi...llet%202011.pdf

Finally got Ireland on board with RTE'S press release of its own for advertisers announcing RTE's Olympics plans that includes video streaming direct from RTE's Facebook page and from RTE Sport's website with replays on RTE Player. RTE Radio will get good coverage, more extensively on weekends as opposed to primetime weekday evenings, alongside a RTE 2fm Roadcaster and daily Olympic news on RTE Radio1 with Pat Kenney, Liveline and Mooney. Plus, RTE's TV coverage will be more extensive than ever before, if not all day (9am-10pm). Just in time for many Irish Olympic fans who hopefully anticipate Katie Taylor's path to Olympic gold in the boxing ring. No word yet on will there be Gaelic language coverage.

http://www.rte.ie/me...pics%202012.pdf

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We surely discuss talk about TV, the Internet, cell/mobile phone, and sometimes radio Olympic coverage worldwide here on this thread, but let's not forget about the print mediums, the originators of the Olympic media coverage. Can't forget about them. I'm reminded of this when I thought back recently of one September 1988 Saturday at B. Dalton bookstore at Northwest Plaza, now a shell of its former glorious self due to demographic shifts, and spotted, though did not buy, a copy of the NBC Seoul 1988 Olympic Viewers's Guide. That would have hepled me get my coverage down to my interests, if needed. NBC had since published others with the help of a publishing company guides for Barcelona and Atlanta. Atlanta's was honestly the last one I ever saw, but a trip to eBay revealed that there were subsequent ones for Sydney, Athens, and Beijing. At the time, I presumed that, with the Olympics falling out of favor a bit in the US for TV unless they're held in North America despite still being a large tentpole TV event and shelling lots of money for the TV rights, they were never going to be published. Time will tell if there will be a London edition to that. Never saw the Winter Olympic counterparts or an ABC one for LA/Sarajevo or even CBS's for their Winter Olympic ones in 1992-98, so I can't comment on those if they actually existed.

I have a bunch of old guides from past Olympics, several of which I got off of eBay. I can confirm there was an official guide from Los Angeles (I even have one from Mexico City). On the Winter side, I have Lake Placid, Sarajevo, and Calgary. And yes, CBS did put out a publication for Albertville and Lillehammer. Not sure I've ever seen one for Nagano though.

I think Athens will be the last of its kind though. The way Olympic coverage is structured now, and especially with the Internet being as prominent a source of information as it is, there's no point in printing and distributing such a publication anymore. Print as a news medium certainly isn't dead yet, but for something like this, it has long since lost its purpose as an information provider.

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I have a bunch of old guides from past Olympics, several of which I got off of eBay. I can confirm there was an official guide from Los Angeles (I even have one from Mexico City). On the Winter side, I have Lake Placid, Sarajevo, and Calgary. And yes, CBS did put out a publication for Albertville and Lillehammer. Not sure I've ever seen one for Nagano though.

I think Athens will be the last of its kind though. The way Olympic coverage is structured now, and especially with the Internet being as prominent a source of information as it is, there's no point in printing and distributing such a publication anymore. Print as a news medium certainly isn't dead yet, but for something like this, it has long since lost its purpose as an information provider.

Agreed on those counts.

One aspect that I forget to write here on the Street & Smith 1988 Olympic preview lied in a two-page segment dealing with ABC's coverage of its final Olympics in Calgary, which played a role in my fascination in knowing more on how they covered it. If I can recall correctly, there was not just talk of the ratings of partiucular moments like Dan Jansen's fall and his ill-fated pursuit for gold then and of the US Olympic hockey team but dealing with Jim McKay and Al Michaels. At the other page was the report on how NBC was going to cover Seoul with its 179.5 hours, its first Olympics telecast since Sapporo 1972 not counting the boycotted Moscow Olympics. There was stuff about Bryant Gumbel as the host, Dick Enberg, Charlie Jones, and Gayle Gardner and other involved being involved as sportscasters calling the events.

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I would be very interested in how RDS would cover NCAA March Madness with them and the men's and women's CIS Final 8--I know it's not as a big thing for Canadians as it is for us Americans. They likely would stay in Montreal and call the games there from a monitor.

Unless its the Canadiens, Senators or Stanley Cup Finals, RDS commentators always do it off monitor. This may be true for the 2012 Games as well.

As far as CTV's ads go, I've noticed them quite a bit on TSN lately (I watch TSN a lot more than CTV). There are two new ones that have aired recently. One, as you mentioned, features Lopes-Schleip. The other features Thomas Daley.

I think too much is made of the other sports on US TV during the Olympics. During the Winter Games it is mostly basketball (both NBA and NCAA) and one NASCAR race (albeit the biggest NASCAR race). There are a couple PGA tournaments thrown in there as well. Its lot like sports are at a standstill in the rest of the world. The Premiership (and Serie A and La Liga etc.) races are heating up in Europe, not to mention the Champions League and Europa League returning for knockout stages. Northern hemisphere rugby has the 6 Nations in February, while Super Rugby is starting in the southern hempisphere.

The Summer Olympics usually (not this year though) line up with the start of the European football season, especially in England and Germany. People in Europe and Australia watch the PGA Championship (and WGC event the week before) too. So, especially with the Winter Olympics, I'm not so sure there is less going on in other parts of the world compared to the US.

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The aforementioned Priscilla Lopes-Schleip Believe TSN promo. The Durham region in Ontario, where she's from (Whitby, Ontario in her exact case) is also where you get Oshawa (home to the OHL's Oshawa Generals and the NBL Canada's Oshawa Power and is the Canadian Detroit--General Motors Canada is based there) and Ajax. The Durham Municipality is considered part of the Greater Toronto Area. Both of these commercials puts as much emphasis on the fans and the people celebrating in the countries (Canada, Great Britain, India, Italy, Poland, China, Jamaica, and The Philippines) filmed for this campaign watching the Games in action on various media platforms as much as the Olympians themselves. Though you don't hear from the Olympians themselves like we did for the CTV Vancouver campaign.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzTD2XnNg7s

British diver Tom Daley promo. Gotta have the hosts involved here in this--portions of the campaign was filmed there after all. Both have Gordon Pinsent's voiceover.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGNSeklP9SA

There is no point in making those Olympic viewers' guides anymore with the Internet making itself a prominent part of Olympic coverage, as you say Quaker2001. However, in the PDF press releases for the programming guides online, like NBC did for Beijing, it could mention the times (ET) for the events to start live online as much for the TV listings and have brief profiles of the sportscasters. Actually, I think I may recall spotting those CBS Winter Olympic Viewers' Guides at B. Dalton and Waldenbooks--I think it was for Albertville back then. Like to start collecting those myself. I happen to have a few 1970s Australian Olympic TV viewers guides from eBay, back when the coverage was shared with ABC, Seven, Nine, and Ten, before it was all under one network and mostly black and white (Australians didn't fully have color TV until 1975). That Street & Smith's Seoul preview also featured results, though not fully comprehensive, from Los Angeles and Calgary that were in orangish-yellow pages at the back.

I just remembered USA Today's! It published its own Olympic preview guide for Vancouver, like it annually does for college football, NFL, college basketball, the World Cup, and the NHL. And among the first pages in it, it had a one-page TV guide for the daily Olympic coverage. It dealt with all of the sports and, yes, it was US-centric. I need to dig that up soon to further jog my memory. I see no reason why USA Today couldn't do likewise with London, and surely it's in the plans.

At around the same time as Seoul's Olympics, ACCESS used to make a guide to all of the Olympic events with the all the rules, records, use of apparatus, and who's competing. Plus there was a brief history of the Olympics at the back and Olympic nation codes for the participating nations. Bought that too! I know it did an edition for Barcelona too.

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FOXTEL down in Australia is confident over the potential of its increasing revenues and subscription numbers so far in the leadup for the London Summer Olympics:

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/business/a/-/national/12851987/foxtel-subscriber-numbers-revenue-up/

If you're in the UK, the Broadcasting House in London, the BBC Scotland's studios in Glasgow, and the National Media Museum in Bradford will be your only places to see the 2012 London Olympic action partly in Ultra HD.

http://www.pcauthority.com.au/News/292828,olympics-2012-to-be-partly-broadcast-in-ultra-hd.aspx

South Korea's SBS Olympic website. Gonna be hard for me to know how many hours SBS will broadcast the Olympics:

http://olympic.sbs.co.kr/main.jsp

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C4 revealed their paralympic team last week with a mixture of established broadcasters and new talent found through it's search for disabled presenters.

Claire Balding heads up the team having fronted the BBC coverage since Sydney and remaining a part of the BBC Olympic team, while C4 News anchor John Snow will front the ceremonies. Jonathan Edwards will also be switching from the BBC to C4 for the Paralympics, while Rick Edwards - host of C4's Paralympic Show and their main athletics presenter (after the disaster of Ortis Deely) also features alongside Ade Adepitan. Sky Sports News veterans Kelly Cates and Georgie Bingham also feature, while Aussie comedian Adam Hills, who worked for ABC during the 2008 games, will be part of the nightly highlights shows.

The new faces amongst the line up include Daráine Mulvihill and Arthur Williams in the studio and Rachael Latham, Jordan Jarrett-Bryan, Martin Dougan, Liam Holt and Alex Brooker on location.

http://www.channel4.com/info/press/news/channel-4-assembles-groundbreaking-paralympic-presenting-team

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More details on NBC's online Olympic partenership with You Tube that Quaker2001 mentioned about

http://www.pcmag.com...,2401262,00.asp

http://techland.time...ympics-for-nbc/

This seems like a win-win for all involved. YouTube will have their profile strengthened as they dive further into the live-streaming market. And NBC partners up with a familiar brand name that is likely to draw attention to them as well. Hopefully this setup will be less restrictive as we've seen in the past from NBC. Either way, this is good news for Olympics fans in the United States.

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This seems like a win-win for all involved. YouTube will have their profile strengthened as they dive further into the live-streaming market. And NBC partners up with a familiar brand name that is likely to draw attention to them as well. Hopefully this setup will be less restrictive as we've seen in the past from NBC. Either way, this is good news for Olympics fans in the United States.

My sentiments exactly! Good news all around definitely. YouTube being the household name that it is for many around the world, not just Americans and Canadians, will definitely expand its reach and strengthen its brand this way with major stuff. Yeah, it has already streamed live events numerous times. But none bigger than this. I too hope this will spell end to that disaster of using your DIRECTV number and code to get access to the good stuff online (like with what happened during Vancouver). Hope NBC also learned from their mistakes by having it free and live, Furthermore, hope one of the terms of agreement will be allowing those Olympic channels already there on You Tube from Torino to Vancouver would be made accessible for American residents.

Down under yesterday, the Nine Network made known its Olympic broadcast at Sydney's Aqua Restaurant that is overlooking the North Sydney Pool. Yes, Ken Sutcliffe and Eddie McGuire are the returnees from Vancouver (just like Sir Rols said as predicted during Vancouver) with Leila McKinnon, Karl Stefanovic, Mark Nicholas, and Cameron Williams joining on with them to front it. Nine Managing Partner Jeff Browne has been attacked for sexism due to the ratio of one woman presenter to five men, but Browne scoffs all that. Nine will air 300 hours in all, all simulacasted on its digital channel GEM. It will start the competition with 14.5 hours daily from 6:30pm-9am (AEST) with London Live following that (9-11am). London Gold will serve as the daily afternoon highlight show from 4-6pm. Ben Fordham and Alicia Loxley will bring regular updates. Nine's commentators announced so far are Granty Hackett, Giaan Rooney, and Ray Warren (swimming), Andrew Gaze (basketball), Kerri Pottharst (beach volleyball), James Tomkins (rowing), Andrew Voss (weightlifting), Melinda Gainsford-Taylor (athletics), Debbie Watson (water polo), Jane Fleming (athletics), Michael Slater(diving), Scott McGrory(cycling), James Brayshaw (rowing). and McGuire on the marathon and triathlon--lord help us on that one... :(

Anybody betting Gaze would reprise his duties on FOXTEL more extensively?

There's also going to be an 8-part series focusing on Australian Olympians called Road To London and a crew focused on access to the Athletes' Village and the venues. Even the Australian edition Today team will be in London a week before the start of the London that will feature behind the scenes stuff and coverage of the OC Australian flag bearer ceremony and the Aussie Olympic team. Each Sunday morning, Nine's Wide World of Sports plans athletes' performances reports. Sally Pearson is Nine's Olympic athlete ambassador.

http://www.mediaspy....coverage-plans/

http://wwos.ninemsn....aspx?id=8431268

http://www.digitalsp...c-coverage.html

Nine's Olympics 2012 website through its Wide World of Sports:

http://wwos.ninemsn....ondon-olympics/

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For #London2012 the BBC will broadcast 24 simultaneous live HD web streams and produce a web page for every athlete

For the first time, we will broadcast live from every venue from the start to the finish of each day’s action. At peak we will be offering 24 simultaneous HD streams on the BBC website – compared with just six from Beijing. We’re looking at distributing those across a wide range of platforms - including to YouView and other connected TVs as well as, of course, via BBC iPlayer to PCs, tablets, smart-phones and other digital devices....

...Our website will automatically assemble on demand a detailed web-page devoted to every one of the thousands of athletes who will be taking part.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/speeches/2012/thompson-rts.html#TWEET102822

https://twitter.com/#!/BBCWorld

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NBC Universal's Billion Dollar Olympic Lab research initiative now will measure the viewing habits of portable viewing devices during the London Olympics in 44 markets

http://www.radio-inf...g-in-44-markets

BBC Trust outlines what terms BBC Radio 5 Live and BBC Radio 5 Live Olympic Extra will do during their Olympic radio coverage. Starting July 23, in time for the preliminary soccer games, everything should be ready to go for the digital BBC Radio 5 Live Olympics Extra under a budget of 200,000 pounds (sorry, this shared computer lacks a British pound sign). The following article also states that BBC Parliament will be suspended in the digital terrestial TV services during the Games unless the MPs are called back into Parliament.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...t-arts-17367288

Will the 2012 London Olympics usher in a new era for British TV in every aspect and high digital interest connecting Brits everywhere as it all penetrates into the mainstream and reaching everyone? With every promotional push the BBC is doing for TV and online, it sure hopes so.

http://www.ft.com/cm...l#axzz1p7tZslkf

Bell Mobile TV platform gets a boost hooking up with Toronto-based company Quickplay up in Canada, already in use with TSN's and RDS's coverage of March Madness, with demand well ahead for London.

http://www.techvibes...oost-2012-03-02

Don't look for Canada to be engaged into the 3D coverage of the London Olympics. Let alone any interest from the Canadian Olympic Broadcast Media Consortium to film any Olympic coverage on 3D cameras. 3DTV isn't as big an incentive, a presence, or an appetite as it has in the United States and Great Britain.

http://www.techvibes...oost-2012-03-02

Got Belgium on my mind right now with the Flemish broadcasting team of Sporza, EEN, and Canvas getting involved for London produced under the Sporza banner as the 2012 Belgian Olympic team taking shape. What I got right now is a news report on EEN from Het Journaal of the 2012 Belgian Olympic Fashion Show that took place on February 2 with the Olympic apparel line designed by Stijn Helsen at The Conrad Hotel.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0u_zDRiy3v0

Sporza's London Olympics website (with videos of Belgian Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls under the Road To London show): http://www.sporza.be...uws/Londen_2012

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More Olympic broadcasting info coming regarding SuperSport in South Africa and sub-Saharan Africa: 3 HD channels, one of them a 24-hour one, four standard definition Supersport channels with daily coverage officially starting on July 23 from 9am-midnight (South African time). DSTv and Multi Choice will offer them with SuperSport.

http://mediaupdate.co.za/?IDStory=45493

When are going to hear from NZ in terms of theirs from Sky Sport and PRIME TV?

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Just found this while surfing looking to see if Germany's ARD and ZDF made further Olympic TV plans. What we have here is another one of those Olympic TV programming press kits for advertisers that we seen from France Televisions and Ireland's RTE. As being in the strongest economy in Europe, ZDF's 16-page kit offers a triple-level advertisers' deal packages to select from. On the broadcasting side, both ARD (or Das Erste, if you prefer) and ZDF plans to broadcast the Summer Olympics live from London daily from 9am-1am (Central European Time)--approximately 15 hours and 250 hours total combined from the two. It's very much more detailed than those previous two I linked--even showing companies that, based on the media success in the percentage of German viewers of Beijing and Athens from the two networks, the advertisers will benefit. ZDF will start things off in the first two days with the Opening Ceremony at 20:15 (Eroffnungsfeier, no umlauts on shared computer), as ARD and ZDF alternate on both ceremonies, and the first day of competiton the following Saturday before alternating with ARD. ARD, broadcasters of the Closing Ceremony (Schlussfeier), actually will start their Olympic days at 9, ZDF goes on 9:45 on their days and will have 8 days of Olympic coverage.

http://www.zdf-werbe...don_2012_dt.pdf

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