Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Faster

Kuala Lumpur Part II?

Recommended Posts

I remember the ridiculously low attendance at KL in 1998 and now the venues are empty in Delhi 2010? I know Indians are not the most sports mad people in the world but you would have thought some would have shown up given how much they seem to care about hosting the games.

Too bad puppy isn't on the ground.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The crowd attendance so far is terrible. Hopefully it will pick up as the days progress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KL was terrible for attendance i had tickets for the swimming i coudnt even give away. These are looking much the same and they want to host an Olympics don't think that will ever happen i my life time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not looking good so far attendance wise - let's see how the evening sessions do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not looking good so far attendance wise - let's see how the evening sessions do.

Watching the medal presentation for the men's team gymnastics right now and there is literally no one there. Pathetic...

For a supposed major event that was going to reflect positively on the development of India and it's desire to host a SOGs these CGs have done stuff all for their reputation. At least KL delivered on time with all the venues in place on time....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just watching the Indian V Scotland Womens Hocket match online via the BBC and the attendance is shocking i'd say its less than 10% full. You would have thought it would have been busy considering the home country is playing. Also during the mens relay awards ceremony at the pool there was no one in the audience to watch the ceremonies. Either they all left (which is rude) or just no one there!

What was the pricing for some of the sports and how do that equate to the local delhite or whatever you call them!

R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the swimming commentators on the BBC it's not a case of tickets not being sold - it's a case of tickets not being printed. Friends of there's had tried to get tickets but they literally didn't have the tickets to sell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

/\ I should've gone; it's so exclusive!!

(Or maybe the locals didn't want to catch the germs of the foreigners? :lol: )

Time to get serious with "AudiencePak,"-- the software program that fills in your stadia digitally!!

Edited by baron-pierreIV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the swimming commentators on the BBC it's not a case of tickets not being sold - it's a case of tickets not being printed. Friends of there's had tried to get tickets but they literally didn't have the tickets to sell.

Wow :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least with the Olympics there will be thousands of Japanese, Chinese, Australians, Americans, Canadians, Brits, French and Germans. With the commies its just a few hundred from the major nations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4197857.jpg

Comm Games stadiums empty as Indians stay away

OPINION: The number of empty seats at the Commonwealth Games raises the question of whether anyone in Delhi actually cares about the event.

After the troubled leadup to the start of the Games, the wonderful opening ceremony raised hopes that they could be a success.

But they got off to a shocker on the opening day.

The stadiums were virtually empty.

Netball, hockey, tennis and gymnastics looked embarrassingly devoid of fans.

Even a top-class event like swimming could only muster a half full audience.

There were concerns before the Games that Indians didn't appear too interested in them.

Those fears now appear very real.

Clearly they haven't marketed the event in their own back yard.

Add in the constant and very real threat of security issues and it's clear that the international audience hasn't turned up either.

India apparently has very real hopes about hosting an Olympics.

Quite how they think they can persuade anyone about that after the logistical nightmares they have endured in the leadup to the Commonwealth Games defies belief.

And now those same hopes will have taken another setback from some damaging images coming out of the first day of action.

They need to do something about filling some seats fast.

It's a very bad look for international TV audiences and no amount of tight and clever camera work can hide the fact that no one seems to be there.

Many of the Commonwelath Games sports aren't high on India's sporting strengths or interests and that appears to be shining through.

Let's hope for the sake of atmosphere that crowds can build as the Games go on.

Right now some stadiums are looking like ghost towns rather than being situated smack, bang in the middle of one of the most populated cities in the world.

link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not like India is lacking in the population department...

At this point, they should just take people off the streets and fill the arenas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

emptyseatsdelhi.jpg

Fans will fill empty seats, say Games organisers

DELHI: Commonwealth Games organisers have dismissed fears locals were boycotting the event after a tiny spectator turnout at many venues on the first day of competition. Fewer than 100 spectators turned up to watch the Australian netball team thrash Samoa on Monday morning while swimmers raced in front of about 300 onlookers, 200 of them from western countries.

Crowds were thin also at the tennis, a popular sport in India that was making its debut as a Commonwealth Games sport. Even the appearance of Indian star Rohan Bopanna failed to draw much support.

He played in front of about 200 spectators on centre court at the fortress-like RK Khanna Stadium.

Advertisement: Story continues below

Allegations of rampant corruption and mismanagement in the lead-up to the Delhi Games sparked calls for a boycott.

In August, India's best-selling author and youth commentator Chetan Bhagat wrote in the Times of India that the Games were the "biggest and most blatant exercise in corruption in independent India's history" and called on people to stay away as a protest against bribery and sleaze.

Bhagat believes many Indians don't want to be a part of the event after the allegations of graft and incompetence. "There is no organised movement against the Games but I think many people feel queasy about going," he told the Herald on Monday.

A spokesman for the Delhi Games Organising Committee, Lalit Bhanot, said there was no boycott. He blamed Sunday's Opening Ceremony, which did not finish until after 10pm, for the small Monday morning turnout.

"It will pick up soon," he told the Herald. "The crowds will come." Another source close to the organising committee said India was a "last-minute market" and that ticket sales had picked up dramatically yesterday after the success of the opening ceremony. There were also plans to bring in school children to fill seats, he said.

Tracy Parish, spokeswoman for the Australian Commonwealth Games team, said athletes were expecting small crowds in some sports, especially netball, which is not well known in India.

When Delhi's Games preparations were thrown into crisis two weeks ago by a bridge collapse and filthy, unfinished rooms at the Games village there were fears that other arrangements, such as logistical and transport, could be lacking.

However, the elaborate plans made by Delhi authorities to provide tight security while moving athletes and officials around the huge city seem to have worked on the first day of the Games. Parish said athletes had not experienced problems getting to stadiums on Monday.

Despite serious warnings about the threat of terrorism in Delhi before the Games, there were no major security incidents reported during the opening ceremony or on the first morning of competition.

However, the Australian government has issued a fresh warning about 25 big screens being erected in public places around Delhi to allow people to watch events.

"These sites will have a lower level of security than at the Games venues," the advisory said.

A Singapore Airlines plane flying from Moscow to Singapore was denied permission to make an emergency landing in Delhi on Sunday night because of airspace restrictions imposed for the opening ceremony. The pilot became aware of a bomb threat when it was several hundred kilometres north of Delhi but was forced to land in the eastern Indian city of Kolkata instead.

"They came here as Delhi air traffic control denied them permission to land," an official at Kolkata airport told the Herald. "The flight made emergency landing last night due to a bomb threat."

Sydney Morning Herald

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

016047-swimming-crowds.jpg

(this was considered a decent crowd among a few empty seats)

Chaos on day one of Games

Paul Mulvey and Ian McCullough

October 4, 2010 - 9:24PM

After the high of the opening ceremony, the Commonwealth Games came quickly crashing back to earth with a farcical boxing weigh-in and sparse crowds on the first day of competition.

It didn't take long either, with the first official event of the Games descending into chaos as the 8am (1330 AEDT) boxing weigh-in was abandoned after faulty scales registered nearly all fighters overweight.

Boxers were sent running around the steamy athletes village and into saunas to lose weight only to return to the scales to find themselves heavier than before, some by as much as two kilograms.

Advertisement: Story continues below

After irate coaches demanded the scales be checked, Monday's weigh-in was eventually scrapped and officials will try again on recalibrated scales on Tuesday, only hours before fighting begins, but not before many fighters have unnecessarily drained themselves one day out from competing.

"It is a farce, but there is not a lot more we can do, I have never seen this before," said Australia's assistant boxing coach Don Abnett.

"I thought last year when I witnessed a bloke in Victoria win a fight with one arm I had seen it all, but this even tops that."

Games Organising Committee secretary general Lalit Bhanot refused to admit there was an issue with the weigh-in.

"There's no problem with boxing, boxing will start on Tuesday, no problem," he told AAP.

"There was a problem with the weighing machine but that has been resolved, so there is no problem.

"Everything is going in the right direction, everything has started on time. There might be one or two technical difficulties, but it doesn't mean they will affect the Games.

"Swimming has started on time, weightlifting has started on time, badminton has started on time, archery has started on time, gymnastics has started on time, everything is going in the right direction."

Technical issues have also troubled the results service on the opening day, with details from some venues not getting through.

"We've still got results systems not fully connected," said a senior source, who did not wish to be named.

"There's been a lack of planning from a technical point of view. And there's a lack of urgency, they still think they're running a local competition."

Spectators at the venues have access to the results, but they have been few and far between on day one.

Australia's netballers opened their campaign with a strong 76-39 win over Samoa in front of a crowd of 58 at an embarrassingly empty Thyagaraj Sports Complex.

"Netball's not that huge in India so I can't imagine the crowd improving much, but we don't care," said Australia goal shooter Cath Cox.

"If we win a gold medal in front of a man and a dog, that's fine with me."

Row upon row of empty seats witnessed the opening of the squash and badminton tournaments at the Siri Fort Sports Complex, while Wales and New Zealand started the women's hockey in front of a tiny crowd at the Dhyan Chand National Stadium.

Swimming, however, attracted a decent crowd among a few empty seats at the Dr SP Mukherjee Aquatics Complex for the morning heats.

The first gold medal of the Games went to Nigerian weightlifter Augustina Nwaokolo in the women's 48kg division.

SMH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the swimming commentators on the BBC it's not a case of tickets not being sold - it's a case of tickets not being printed. Friends of there's had tried to get tickets but they literally didn't have the tickets to sell.

What does this mean? That the tickets are sold out but people aren't showing?

Or they were acquired by businesses and not used up?

Or people didn't get passed security?

I remember the OC for the World Cup being about 1/3 empty because people got stuck in traffic, but by kick off the stadium was full and attendance was otherwise generally excellent.

At least the venues are nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What does this mean? That the tickets are sold out but people aren't showing?

Or they were acquired by businesses and not used up?

Or people didn't get passed security?

I remember the OC for the World Cup being about 1/3 empty because people got stuck in traffic, but by kick off the stadium was full and attendance was otherwise generally excellent.

At least the venues are nice.

A lot of tickets have been purchased online/over the phone/in the post. There have been computer/system difficulties in getting the tickets physically printed. A lot of people have been turning up to ticket outlets and venues hoping to have their ticket printed for them before entering to find that there has been a system error and they aren't able to enter. That's my understanding at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I read, it was also a case of the ticket booths being "missing" at venues and locals wanting to buy tickets were turned away.

And an organiser (can't rem if it was KAlmadi) actually said this happened on the first day because the OC went home late after the opening ceremony. Wow. Perhaps partying the night away thinking all their troubles are over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kuala Lumpur Part II? Umm, i'm not an expert about the CWG but i could swear that Kuala Lumpur had more attendance than this. It looks so patheticaly empty. If you're going to host an event which no one cares about (i mean, come on, i expected swiming events to be more packed up) then why do you waste the money? Also, the whole ''tickets not being printed'' thing just proves one more time that the Delhi organization are one of the worse, if not the worst, i've seen on years.

I bet Kalamity and co. will blame the press soon for projecting a bad image of the games and saying it caused the low attendance. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least with the Olympics there will be thousands of Japanese, Chinese, Australians, Americans, Canadians, Brits, French and Germans. With the commies its just a few hundred from the major nations.

Would there though? Along with the question over locals being able to attend, with all the uncertainty and terror alerts beforehand, the foreigners were not exactly encouraged to make the trip either.

What does this mean? That the tickets are sold out but people aren't showing?

Or they were acquired by businesses and not used up?

Or people didn't get passed security?

It means the tickets weren't actually physically printed. Had to laugh though today at another of the Indian organisers just flat out denying they'd been a problem with attendance, and saying thousands of people were queuing up to get into venues - there just weren't enough ticket booths to enable them to actually get in!

Be interesting to see how full the main stadium is for the next couple of nights - if they ever get the in-field sorted!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...