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danfla
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"I'm sorry but you can not view this video. Germans one guess why!

It can´t be the official song! You gtta be kidding me. Hopefully, the OC will not be like this. It´s ridiculous! How on Eartn can a city bid for the SOG and choose THIS as the official song? :o

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It can´t be the official song! You gtta be kidding me. Hopefully, the OC will not be like this. It´s ridiculous! How on Eartn can a city bid for the SOG and choose THIS as the official song? :o

I'm not surprised.
Brazil has talent to fail in artistic performances in major sporting events .
The Brazilian people have a rich culture , the problem is that there is a ' cultural elite ' who thinks he knows produce good things and representing the Brazilian. They are very fond of the word ' social context ' .
I say with 100% certainty that most of the songs that will be played at the opening ceremony , are not escutadass often by 80 % of Brazilians at least .
The opening of the World Cup was ridiculous .
The official song just reflects the type of ceremony they want to present .
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we've all seen the many pictures of Police and emergency workers protesting (rightfully so) due to poor work conditions, neglect and lack of pay.

But I don't understand why they are even allowed to be at the airport...how is this even happening.

Below is a recent article that shows the pritect5 on video, these guys are just screaming in the airport....can you imagine arriving or having to deal with these guys....very stressful. i hope they get paid.

All eyes on Olympic security as Rio de Janeiro marks one month to go

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Gawker wrote an article listing pretty much everything that so far has gone wrong relating to the games. Some don't exactly directly affect the games, but they're somewhat of bad omens leading up to the games. It is Gawker though, the site that just lost a lawsuit over the Hulk Hogan sex tape, so make of that what you will lol. Also too many damn ignorant comments in the the comment section I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

http://gawker.com/all-the-reasons-the-rio-olympics-are-fucked-1782463214

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I'm already very curious about what kind of nonsense the media will focus in the months before Tokyo 2020.

Of course Rio 2016 deserves criticism in many respects, but the media focuses on so many clichés and misinformation that is very hard to take seriously the articles that have been written lately. It is a sense of panic completely out of proportion. The goal isn't to generate some meaningful critique, but mostly for sensationalism. That's too bad.

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The sad thing is that there is a proliferation of pseudo-journalists who spout out the most ridiculous garbage because they know many people are too lazy to do some research on their own and will accept anything as fact. It really irritates me that the Google Newsstand app on my phone will often feature these dubious stories alongside those of credible news sources.

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The article certainly isn't written in the most professional manner, but if you go through it there are highlighted phrases that will take you to the article's sources if you click on it. Some of the stories have come from the NY Times, AP, and some have even come from Brazilian media. You can get pissy at the manner in which the article is written, but he hasn't exactly said anything false.

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I didn't mentioned exactly the link you posted, the Gawker piece. It was more a general feeling about the stories that have been published, including the New York Times and AP ones .

They're a mixture of relevant criticism ( the fail on the promise to clean the Guanabara Bay up to 80 % until Games, for example) with misleading information (NYT reporter saying that the beach volleyball arena is delayed, but no, it's a temporary construction and it was planned to be built in the weeks before the Games). And that's a lot of other examples.

I'm kind pissy because bad journalism or lack of fact checking or misliding information is counterproductive. As a said, that's a lot of necessary critcism to be made about the Games and people are still creating panic about Zika virus, for instance.

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I didn't mentioned exactly the link you posted, the Gawker piece. It was more a general feeling about the stories that have been published, including the New York Times and AP ones .

They're a mixture of relevant criticism ( the fail on the promise to clean the Guanabara Bay up to 80 % until Games, for example) with misleading information (NYT reporter saying that the beach volleyball arena is delayed, but no, it's a temporary construction and it was planned to be built in the weeks before the Games). And that's a lot of other examples.

I'm kind pissy because bad journalism or lack of fact checking or misliding information is counterproductive. As a said, that's a lot of necessary critcism to be made about the Games and people are still creating panic about Zika virus, for instance.

Exactly!

Like CNN with all its rubbish outdated, misleading information. Even they had to publish things correcting their own "findings", like this article for example:http://http://edition.cnn.com/2016/07/05/health/cre-brazilian-bay-olympics/

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With seven athletes, Tanzania become first nation to confirm Olympic team for Rio 2016

Rio 2016 celebrated an important milestone on Thursday (7 July) after receiving the first official team entry for the Olympic Games. Tanzania, a nation of about 50 million people in East Africa, confirmed that it will send seven athletes to the first edition of the Games in South America.

“We are delighted and excited to receive the first official entry from a National Olympic Committee,” said Melina Xanthopoulou, Rio 2016’s sport entries manager. “Tanzania’s team will be smaller than most, but they will be warmly welcomed here in Rio and we wish them the best of luck.”

The athletes who will represent Tanzania are: Fabiano Joseph (men’s marathon), Saidi Juma Makula (men’s marathon), Alphonce Felix Simbu (men’s marathon), Sara Ramadhani (women’s marathon), Andrew Thomas Mlugu (men’s judo, -73kg), Magdalena Ruth Alex Moshi (women’s swimming, 50m freestyle) and Hilal Hemed Hilal (men’s swimming, 50m freestyle).

More than 200 nations will compete at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, with the largest teams expected to come from the USA, Brazil and China. It is estimated that there will be about 550 Americans, about 450 Brazilians and more than 380 Chinese athletes competing for medals in Rio this August.

https://www.rio2016.com/en/news/tanzania-first-nation-olympics-team-for-rio-2016

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An Optimist’s Guide to the Rio Olympics

In the months leading up to this summer’s Olympics, Rio de Janeiro has been battered by waves of embarrassments and crises. Crime spiked and an economic crisis pushed thousands out of work. The waterways stayed polluted. A mosquito-borne virus became the world’s new health scare. A body part washed up near a venue.

It’s enough to ask: Has everything that could possibly go wrong for the hosts gone wrong?

Not quite. Several things have, in fact, turned out alright. And despite its problems, Rio is used to hosting big parties, from Carnaval to New Year’s to Rihanna shows. Come August, the city will mostly be ready to welcome the thousands of Olympic athletes and tourists set to take part in the Games.

Here are five things that have, so far, gone according to plan.

1) Despite a few hiccups, the venues are ready. The paint is still being applied at some and the seats are still being installed at others, but sporting events could be held there right now without too much fuss. Even the pesky velodrome, the last venue to be ready, was last month delivered intact and ready to receive riders.

Ralph Schürmann, whose family-owned company from a small town in northwestern Germany has built nine Olympic velodromes, and which built the track in Rio, says that despite the delays, working in Rio wasn’t the disaster many imagine.

“Everywhere it’s a little bit different,” he said. “Everything goes more slowly than we’re used to in Germany, but you have to go along with that. Our way of thinking isn’t always the right one. Of course it hasn’t been helpful that the general contractor changed once or twice. But we get it done.”

2) The stars will come. Some high profile athletes have decided not to come to Rio, but the majority are making the trip. Basketball stars LeBron James and Steph Curry won’t be here, but Kevin Durant and Carmelo Anthony will be. Two of the world’s top golfers, Jason Day and Rory McIlroy, opted out, citing concerns over the Zika virus. But golf was never going to be the biggest draw during the Games, so their absences won’t likely be felt once Michael Phelps dives in the pool.

BN-OU797_RIO070_P_20160707152012.jpg ENLARGE
Michael Phelps during the men's 100m butterfly finals in the U.S. Olympic swimming team trials. Photo: rob schumacher/Reuters

3) A new downtown. Perhaps the biggest transformation for Rio has been in a neighborhood not directly linked to any Olympics infrastructure: the city’s downtown port area. The “marvelous port” project has been expensive, and many have questioned the spending priorities. The new, Santiago Calatrava-designed Museum of Tomorrow, at a cost of $60 million, has come in for particular criticism.

But the skeleton-shaped museum has also been an unquestionable draw to a long-neglected neighborhood, and was Rio’s most-visited museum since opening late last year, according to the city. The plaza that encircles the museum has also been revitalized. Where a highway once passed overhead, now food truck owners flip burgers, artisans sell crafts, and kids whiz by on skateboards.

Olympic sports won’t be played there in August, but it will serve as a sort of a fan zone. NBA players, who will be staying on a ship in the port, are expected to make regular appearances.

At the other end of the plaza is the Art Museum of Rio, which puts on innovative exhibits, hosts fun music and dance parties and has a popular rooftop restaurant.

4) Public transportation is working. Some transit projects have been delayed or scaled back, the distances between competition venues is an area of concern, and traffic is still a major issue here, but overall, public transportation in Rio has improved.

An expensive, controversial subway extension has been delayed several times and may not be ready for the Games, but that line would only get you to the neighborhood in western Rio where many of the events are being held, not to the venues themselves. You’ll still have to hop on a bus.

For that, several new stretches of highway and tunnels are done, all of which will reduce traffic for drivers—and tourists and athletes on buses —on some of the city’s busiest throughways. A detailed plan for express, VIP bus lanes is also ready to go, as is a Plan B if the subway extension doesn’t materialize in time. The city’s regular buses are operational, if not entirely comfortable, and a new bus rapid transit system for longer commutes has been vastly expanded. A new light-rail line is now operating downtown, helping revitalize that long-ignored part of the city.

5) The city is as beautiful as ever. Rio’s beaches, mountains and forests will dazzle tourists and athletes alike. The city will shine on TV.

Back to the velodrome. During the construction, German workers as a joke inscribed ‘7-1’ in wet cement at the venue, an allusion to Germany’s thrashing of Brazil at the 2014 World Cup. But the attempt was spotted by local workers, and the inscription was wiped out before it could harden and become permanent. At least one embarrassment avoided.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/an-optimists-guide-to-the-rio-olympics-1467921052

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Rio 2016 is ready to welcome the world

With 25 days to go until the Opening Ceremony, “Rio 2016 is ready to welcome the world” according to International Olympic Committee (IOC) Coordination Commission Chair Nawal El Moutawakel . The Olympic champion, who heads the IOC’s Commission that since 2009 has been following the preparations for the Olympic Games Rio 2016, made this statement after her final pre-Games visit to the Brazilian host city.

After meetings with the Rio 2016 Organising Committee, all three levels of local government (Federal, State and City), and a tour of a number of sporting venues, El Moutawakel said, “Rio 2016 is ready to welcome the world. The Olympians of 2016 can look forward to living in an outstanding Olympic Village and competing in absolutely stunning venues. From views of the Corcovado and Sugar Loaf Mountain to the new state-of-the-art facilities in Barra or Deodoro and the iconic Maracanã Stadium and Copacabana Beach, I cannot imagine more spectacular backdrops for the world’s top sportsmen and women to showcase their talents to a watching world.”

She continued, “I have been visiting Rio regularly since 2009, and I love the Cariocas, and the Brazilians in general. They are a very warm and hospitable people, who know how to welcome guests and how to live life to the fullest. Spectators visiting Rio this August will be able to fully experience that spirit, as they go to the venues, visit the live sites and discover the city. The Cariocas are going to be celebrating, and this means that Rio de Janeiro will be the place to be this August. The Brazilians have also transformed the city through a legacy vision that they have made a reality. Not just by delivering all the venues and services that the Games require on time, but also by creating a legacy that will benefit local citizens and the whole country for decades. The success of these Games will be their success.”

After successfully hosting 44 test events, the Rio 2016 team and the venues are ready for action, with all the facilities receiving their final Olympic touches before the athletes start to arrive in about two weeks’ time. The velodrome and equestrian venues, which were being monitored closely by the organisers, are also in the final stage of preparation, and will be ready for the Games.

The new Metro Line 4, which links Ipanema and Barra da Tijuca, and the Transolimpica Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), linking Barra to Deodoro, will also be fully operational for spectators at the Games. Trains are now running the full length of the metro line, as it enters the final stages of testing. This follows months of work by the Rio State authorities to test the personnel, rolling stock and safety technology of the new line, while the last bits of construction were being completed. The metro will play a key role in a sophisticated transport plan that will see athletes, spectators and local residents take advantage of a number of new pieces of transport infrastructure, such as approximately 150km of new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lines that have been built thanks to the catalyst of the Games and which are already, in some cases, changing local peoples’ lives for the better.

The subject of Zika was discussed during the visit. It was underlined that the latest advice of the WHO reaffirms that “there should be no general restrictions on travel and trade with countries, areas and/or territories with Zika virus transmission, including the cities in Brazil that will be hosting the Olympic and Paralympic Games” (full WHO advice here), while the local authorities and organisers explained the ongoing work that is being carried out to minimise the risk to visitors. It was also pointed out that the Games will take place during the winter months of August and September, when the drier, cooler climate greatly reduces the presence of mosquitoes and therefore the risk of infection.

On the wider security front, the Brazilian authorities reinforced their commitment to safe and secure Games, with a combined security force of 85,000 people guaranteeing the security of the Olympic Village, the sports venues and key infrastructure, such as the city's airports and main roads. Security personnel from 55 countries will be involved in securing the Games.

El Moutawakel was also updated on the work that is being carried out ahead of the Games in the Guanabara Bay and Lagoa venues. The new belt of pipes that has recently been put into service around the Marina da Gloria area is showing its effectiveness, with the latest readings presenting much improved water quality levels in that area. Organisers restated their confidence that both areas of water would provide top-level conditions for the athletes.

Rio 2016 President Carlos Arthur Nuzman commented, “Our journey is now entering its most critical phase: Operation of the Games. We are obviously very proud that we are ready to welcome the world and we can also see the transformation of Rio everywhere we go.” He continued, “A lot of work lies ahead of us but we have plenty of energy. We will deliver great Games.”

With the Games only weeks away, the city of Rio de Janeiro is getting dressed-up, as elements of the Games’ Look go up across the city. Organisers and local authorities were keen to underline the Carioca and Brazilian spirit that athletes, visitors and Games spectators will find in the city this August. As well as seeing the world’s best Olympic athletes competing in outstanding settings, spectators will be able to take advantage of the Games’ live sites, including in the newly revitalised port area; experience the Olympic spirit Carioca style in the Barra and Deodoro Parks; hang out at the beach; and discover a city and people with an important cultural heritage and a reputation for hosting one of the world’s number one celebrations every year, the Carnival.

An explanation was also given of the legacy that the Olympic Games Rio 2016 has given to the city, and which is starting to materialise already today. This includes new transport infrastructure, sports venues that will become schools or sports facilities for local communities, around 70 new hotels, improved waste management, training for thousands of workers and volunteers, and investments in the city and local businesses that will make the city even more attractive in the years to come.

https://www.olympic.org/news/rio-2016-is-ready-to-welcome-the-world

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Skydivers fall to their deaths during Rio Olympic Rings performance

Two skydivers have fallen to their deaths while performing an Olympic Rings aerial routine in Brazil.

A group of 28 skydivers had attempted to recreate the five Olympic rings while in freefall over Boituva, a town 72 miles west of São Paulo.

The Rio 2016 organising committee have stated the aerial performance was part of the official build-up to the opening ceremony on August 5.

SECURITY FORCES THREATEN STRIKES DURING THE OLYMPICS

The original security plan had forecast 9,000 agents from Brazil’s National Security Force – a security squad made up of policemen and firefighters from across the country. Financial problems in the state of Rio have forced the organization to settle for a lower number, 6,000 agents. And now, should the agents carry out with their protest plans, we could have even fewer.

Upon arriving to Rio, agents discovered the subpar conditions in which state officials expect them to live until the end of the Olympics. Some dorms don’t have showers; others don’t have beds. Water is constantly being cut off, and there are leaks are everywhere. Each room houses at least three agents, and it will become even more crowded as the Games draw closer. The quality of the food offered has also been a topic of complaint, and agents are not happy about being lodged in neighborhoods dominated by organized crime. Not exactly the best place for a cop. The list of complaints goes on and on.

“It is absurd to have law enforcement agents starving and living in unhealthy environments during the preparation for the Olympics,” said Elisandro Lotim, from the union representing members of the force. The disgruntled agents gave July 15 as the deadline for the government to meet their demands. Otherwise, they threaten to not work during the Olympics.

MAKE-OVER OF RIO FOR TOURISTS IS JUST LIKE TERRY GILLIAM’S BRAZIL

brazil-e-rio.jpg

Brazil is a classic 1985 dystopian sci-fi movie directed by Terry Gilliam. The movie’s totalitarian and uber-bureaucratic government is reminiscent of George Orwell’s 1984, except that in Brazil, the government works in a buffoonish fashion rather than as the efficient Big Brother. In the movie, big posters with advertisements and nice pictures prevent drivers seeing the ugly, nasty landscape behind them.

Some Brazilians have highlighted the similarities between what the government did in Brazil and what the city of Rio has done recently: install huge 3-meter high (10 feet) posters along the road connecting Rio’s international airport to the city center. The official excuse is that the decoration will help put travelers in an Olympic mood. It has nothing to do with the fact that they perfectly hide all of the favelas along the route.

Having Rio remind people of a dystopian film is probably not going to give us much of an image boost.

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Many cities hosting the Games and other big events do this. Most people are smart enough though to realize that many large cities have areas where poverty and neglect are evident. It is just a sad fact of life.

Would the lives of those in the favelas be any better off if Brazil hadn't taken on the World Cup and the Olympics in such a short time span? I doubt it, the powers that be would have spent the money on something else that have would enhanced the nation's stature. That's why I shake my head when I read comments that essentially say they should have taken the money spent on the Games and put it towards schools and hospitals and other public services. That is just not how it works in most places.

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El Moutawakel says:

“I have been visiting Rio regularly since 2009, and I love the Cariocas, and the Brazilians in general. They are a very warm and hospitable people, who know how to welcome guests and how to live life to the fullest. Spectators visiting Rio this August will be able to fully experience that spirit, as they go to the venues, visit the live sites and discover the city. The Cariocas are going to be celebrating, and this means that Rio de Janeiro will be the place to be this August. The Brazilians have also transformed the city through a legacy vision that they have made a reality. Not just by delivering all the venues and services that the Games require on time, but also by creating a legacy that will benefit local citizens and the whole country fordecades. The success of these Games will be their success.”

Paul says:

Skydivers fall to their deaths during Rio Olympic Rings performance

Two skydivers have fallen to their deaths while performing an Olympic Rings aerial routine in Brazil.

A group of 28 skydivers had attempted to recreate the five Olympic rings while in freefall over Boituva, a town 72 miles west of São Paulo.

The Rio 2016 organising committee have stated the aerial performance was part of the official build-up to the opening ceremony on August 5.


SECURITY FORCES THREATEN STRIKES DURING THE OLYMPICS

The original security plan had forecast 9,000 agents from Brazil’s National Security Force – a security squad made up of policemen and firefighters from across the country. Financial problems in the state of Rio have forced the organization to settle for a lower number, 6,000 agents. And now, should the agents carry out with their protest plans, we could have even fewer.

Upon arriving to Rio, agents discovered the subpar conditions in which state officials expect them to live until the end of the Olympics. Some dorms don’t have showers; others don’t have beds. Water is constantly being cut off, and there are leaks are everywhere. Each room houses at least three agents, and it will become even more crowded as the Games draw closer. The quality of the food offered has also been a topic of complaint, and agents are not happy about being lodged in neighborhoods dominated by organized crime. Not exactly the best place for a cop. The list of complaints goes on and on.

“It is absurd to have law enforcement agents starving and living in unhealthy environments during the preparation for the Olympics,” said Elisandro Lotim, from the union representing members of the force. The disgruntled agents gave July 15 as the deadline for the government to meet their demands. Otherwise, they threaten to not work during the Olympics.


MAKE-OVER OF RIO FOR TOURISTS IS JUST LIKE TERRY GILLIAM’S BRAZIL

brazil-e-rio.jpg

Brazil is a classic 1985 dystopian sci-fi movie directed by Terry Gilliam. The movie’s totalitarian and uber-bureaucratic government is reminiscent of George Orwell’s 1984, except that in Brazil, the government works in a buffoonish fashion rather than as the efficient Big Brother. In the movie, big posters with advertisements and nice pictures prevent drivers seeing the ugly, nasty landscape behind them.

Some Brazilians have highlighted the similarities between what the government did in Brazil and what the city of Rio has done recently: install huge 3-meter high (10 feet) posters along the road connecting Rio’s international airport to the city center. The official excuse is that the decoration will help put travelers in an Olympic mood. It has nothing to do with the fact that they perfectly hide all of the favelas along the route.

Having Rio remind people of a dystopian film is probably not going to give us much of an image boost.

El Moutawakel says:

“I have been visiting Rio regularly since 2009, and I love the Cariocas, and the Brazilians in general. They are a very warm and hospitable people, who know how to welcome guests and how to live life to the fullest. Spectators visiting Rio this August will be able to fully experience that spirit, as they go to the venues, visit the live sites and discover the city. The Cariocas are going to be celebrating, and this means that Rio de Janeiro will be the place to be this August. The Brazilians have also transformed the city through a legacy vision that they have made a reality. Not just by delivering all the venues and services that the Games require on time, but also by creating a legacy that will benefit local citizens and the whole country fordecades. The success of these Games will be their success.”

Things you need remember:

1) Rio has one of the highest criminality rates on Earth, but this was NEVER denied neither in during the bidding process neither after that.;

2) Rio is a city that opens wide the social inequality in developing countries, its topography makes sure nothing is hidden and it HAS NEVER BEEN HIDDEN.

3) There were walls like these ones in lots of cities, be honest. Of course, that would be better not having them. But and then?

4) Members of the Security forces working in Rio were given a 150% increase in their wages.

5) Do you really know Brazil? I doubt it. Have you realized what you said about the skydivers? FGS, man, you'd better showing the country your simpathies.

BUT YOU? YOU ARE THE GUY. A BLOODY, NASTY, DIRTY AND INCONCLUSIVE NEWSPAER SHEET IS MUCH MORE TRUSTWORTHY FOR YOU THAN THE STATEMENT OF SOMEONE WHO HAS BEEN WORKING IN THE PREPARATIONS FOR ALMOST SEVEN YEARS.

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