Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 1.9k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

BTW, this issue has nothing to do with Rio de Janeiro and Olympic Games. The security in Brazilian Grand Prix in Sao Paulo is made exclusively by Police Force of Sao Paulo state. It's a problem fo

My God, don't they have enough problems! {couldn't resist}

Uh, maybe because they are great ways to show what's going on in and around Rio. Keep posting please

The IOC's rule about relays being domestic affairs is one of the better rulings they've made. The three relays since have been a huge success. London's relay whipped a previously slightly cynical UK into Olympic fever and it was great being able to just take an hour or two off work to see it travel through my local High Street.

This happens almost every time the Olympics are held - not something that was unique to 2012. Similarly Australia was quite apathetic toward 2000 until the relay. It doesn't make the blanket rule any more or less valid. It should be open to discussion. I'm not suggesting an all out relay to every Olympic host - but 2016 is particularly important to somewhere like South America, as 2000 was to Oceania where it toured our entire region to forge a sense regional ownership of the 2000 Olympics.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This happens almost every time the Olympics are held - not something that was unique to 2012. Similarly Australia was quite apathetic toward 2000 until the relay. It doesn't make the blanket rule any more or less valid. It should be open to discussion. I'm not suggesting an all out relay to every Olympic host - but 2016 is particularly important to somewhere like South America, as 2000 was to Oceania where it toured our entire region to forge a sense regional ownership of the 2000 Olympics.

This happens almost every time the Olympics are held - not something that was unique to 2012. Similarly Australia was quite apathetic toward 2000 until the relay. It doesn't make the blanket rule any more or less valid. It should be open to discussion. I'm not suggesting an all out relay to every Olympic host - but 2016 is particularly important to somewhere like South America, as 2000 was to Oceania where it toured our entire region to forge a sense regional ownership of the 2000 Olympics.

Well, who's going to pay for the "longer" relays? Would Coke and Samsung want to pony up more? Hasn't the IOC already endorsed cost-cutting measures -- and prohibiting the extravagant foreign legs of any torch relay was one of their earlier, sensible cost-cutting measures. You guys have no idea of the toll these extremely long relays take on the people who work them -- other than you guys dreaming "oh, this would be a more glorious thing." Yeah, more glorious, my foot.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
2016 moves to have two Olympic pyres; proposal will be presented
Flame to be lit at the Maracana during the opening ceremony, but Engenhão Olympic stadium and home of athletics, should also receive symbol
It is possible that the two pyres are lit at the same time - one in the Maracanã and another in Engenhão - preventing a dislocation of the Olympic flame from a stadium to another after the opening ceremony. The possibility is part of the first script of ceremonies who is ready and will be presented this week by the Organizing Committee for the 2016 Games to the International Olympic Committee during the visit to Rio of the Coordination Committee.
The Rule 54 of the Olympic Charter says that the Organising Committee is responsible for bringing the flame to the Olympic Stadium, as stressed the IOC press office:
- In Rio, the Olympic Stadium will be the site of athletics, and the ceremonies are scheduled for the Maracanã. It is now up to the Games Organizing Committee to make a proposal for the location of the flame with the creative concept of the ceremonies.
IOC president Thomas Bach said that has not yet considered the possibility, but believe in a good solution. The fact that the Maracanã be a tourist spot and stay better located than Engenhão can also influence the decision to have two Olympic flames in 2016.
- Frankly I have not thought about it. I'm sure we will find a good solution. I am very much in favor of a solution where people can see the Olympic cauldron is in the city and thus feel the Olympic spirit.
The ceremonies director of Rio 2016, Leonardo Caetano confirms the possibility of two pyres in Rio Games:
- You must have a pyre at the Maracana, because that is where she lights. And the Olympic Stadium, historically, has a fire. So, at least two pyres is the way to think about. But that is not decided. In the presentation to the IOC I do not need say how the cauldron will be lit, but where it will stay.

Google Translate

Text extracted from this news in portuguese:
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not only cauldron, but the entire logistics involving its operation.

Yeah, what's that? Having a tank w/ 17 days' supply of gas -- at 2 sites. That's not exactly brain surgery, is it? Some of the past Winter hosts have placed as many as five (5) smaller caldera at the various venues. (I think Calgary 1988 had at least 4 other caldera besides the main one at the Macmahon Stadium.) So, it's NOT exactly a new, insurmountable challenge, is it?

Edited by baron-pierreIV
Link to post
Share on other sites

Come to think of it now, Berlin 1936 had THREE caldera:

- the main one at Olympic Stadium

- a 2nd smaller one at the Rowing venue in Grenau; and

- a 3rd smaller one aboard an old Hanseatic ship in Kiel harbor (site of the sailing events).

Many, many other multiple ones afterwards. This one at the Olympic Museum in Lausanne is the 2nd one for Albertville 1992 (which sat at Tignes):

olympic-flames-lausanne-flickr-julianlim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lighting 2 cauldrons. Who would do such a thing. Oh wait..

Vancouver-2010-Olympic-Cauldron.jpg

v43_22442283.jpg

Did the cauldron in the OC/CC stadium actually burn the whole time the Olympics were there, or was it just shut down in between ceremonies? Sure there are 2 cauldrons, but under slightly different circumstances where fuel resources weren't exactly doubled.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the cauldron in the OC/CC stadium actually burn the whole time the Olympics were there, or was it just shut down in between ceremonies? Sure there are 2 cauldrons, but under slightly different circumstances where fuel resources weren't exactly doubled.

London only had one cauldron and it didn't even stay lit the whole time. No need to have two going all the time. Just have the Maracana one on when an event is occuring at the stadium.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

London only had one cauldron and it didn't even stay lit the whole time. No need to have two going all the time. Just have the Maracana one on when an event is occuring at the stadium.

The one at Maracana will, or I hope, be sited where it will also be visible from the stadium beside which will have more constant crowds coming to view the indoor volleyball matches. So the one at Maracana, can be kept on what's called a 'low-burn' in order to provide a photo-opp for the crowds coming for other nearby events. When there are the football matches at Maracana, then they can always amp up the flame to what's called 'ceremony-burn', i.e., big and bright.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Nice little piece in the Guardian written by our former Olympics Minister

It’s 500 days to go until the 2016 Rio Olympic Games and I can’t wait

2012-Olympic-Games---Open-007.jpg

The 2012 Olympic Games was a spectacular experience made even more special by its people. With 500 days to go until Rio 2016, the real countdown has begun towards the greatest show on earth

“Embarrassment for the organisers of London 2012”.

Not exactly the headline we were looking for to mark the 500-day countdown. But it was the headline we got. Our brand new digital countdown clock had frozen.

Embarrassing if it’s just on the wall in the office, but this was Trafalgar Square.

So let’s hope the organisers in Rio have a better day. They will be excited, nervous and tense but, most of all, absolutely committed to delivering the best possible Games for their city and their country. They will know the world will be watching and they will be desperate to get it right.

That’s certainly how we felt. 500 days is about the time the Games start to seep back into the public consciousness.

It’s the time the games stop feeling like a concept and start beginning to feel real. Volunteers are being trained, tickets go on sale, the Olympic Games swings into view.

Rio will, of course, find their own way - and that’s exactly the right thing to do. They were chosen as the first South American hosts because of who they are and what they can deliver. A pale imitation of London will not be on the agenda.

And with 500 days to go there will be three things above all that they will be desperate to get right.

The first is obvious – infrastructure. Without the venues the Games are impossible, but it’s much more than that. Heathrow, the Underground, security, the athletes village, the list goes on. None of it glamorous but all of it vital.

The second is the most important - the Games have to belong to the people. In these cynical times that sounds almost trite but think back to 2012 - was that not how it felt?
Advertisement

The London Games were organised with a very particular set of aims and values that infused everything we did. They were the spirit of the Games: excellence, empowering communities, legacy through innovation, building human capital, parity through the games and Paralympics, and a UK Games in London.

Nothing exemplified that philosophy more than the Games makers. There were 240,000 applications, 70,000 eventually volunteered. No pay, no expenses, no travel, no financial compensation whatsoever. They did it simply to be a part of the Games.

I met a woman who commuted hours each and every day from Peterborough and was delighted to do so.

Another had saved from the day we won the Games in 2005 until the opening ceremony so that she could leave her business behind for a few weeks to put on giant rubber hands and direct tourists from the Underground to their events.

The people made the Games – that atmosphere around London, the surprising smiles on commuters’ faces, that very real sense that something magnificent was happening.

It was a communal feeling across the entire country that this was unique. That from Danny Boyle’s opening ceremony to the thrill of London on a sunny day, underneath all the daily frustrations and problems, our country is still something pretty special, something to be proud of, and when we put our minds to it we can still be the very best in the world.

And it was the whole country. Right from the start of the torch relay from Land’s End, on 19 May, to the Olympic Park 70 days later, it was the people on those streets all around the UK that solidified the public support for the Games.

That will be much harder for Rio – in a country the size of the United States – but they will want to get it right, and the good news is that we found that spirit infectious.

The final element is much harder to guarantee. Any great tournament needs the hosts to do well. The sport matters – it carries the whole Games along. In 2012 we knew we had great athletes, we knew we had every opportunity to succeed, but until the medals are won you just never know.

In the end of course, they exceeded our wildest dreams. 29 golds, 17 silver, 19 bronze. Third, behind only the United States and China.

That success put rocket boosters on the Games. Would the Games have been a success had Team GB failed? Of course it would. Would it have been the same? No way.

And of course all the time, just beyond the Games there is a fourth imperative – the legacy. When the world moves on, years of planning burst into action and the permanent works begins.

In London of course we are three years down that path.

Not everything is perfect – of course it’s not – but the regeneration we are already seeing in and around Stratford will change the lives of generations Londoners.

Homes where people need them, new transport links, tens of thousands of permanent jobs, one of the best parks in London and Olympic standard facilities open to the general public, no more expensive than the public alternatives down the road.

So Rio will be desperate to ensure that they host a successful Olympics, but organisers will know that not all the prizes are on the track.

In 500 days Rio de Janeiro will host the 31st Olympiad.

It will be difficult, it will be challenging, yet I have every confidence it will be brilliant and rewarding. I am immensely jealous – but I wish them every success.

Tessa Jowell is a Labour MP and was the culture secretary when London was awarded the 2012 Olympics. She subsequently became the Olympics minister and then the shadow Olympics minister


http://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2015/mar/23/500-days-rio-olympics-london-2012-tessa-jowell?CMP=share_btn_tw

Link to post
Share on other sites

The countdown clock in Trafalgar Square got stuck on its first day of operation - only a few days after the comedy show Twenty Twelve had a plot involving exactly that happening. Very embarrassing for all concerned :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Not sure where to put this but guess it's news.

Pretty terrible.

Apparently the lake is contaminated with raw sewage and pollution runoff... And athletes will be competing in it.

Nineteen tonnes (21 tons) of dead fish have been removed from Rio de Janeiro's Rodrigo de Freitas lake, where the Olympic rowing and canoeing events take place next year. On Monday the Brazilian Environmental Defence Commission (Alerj) said it would investigate the causes. The municipal environmental secretary said strong rains and low temperatures were to blame. Alerj said the cause was man-made, including contamination by domestic and industrial waste

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/video/2015/apr/14/2016-rio-olympics-rowing-dead-fish-video

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a CNN report re the same, including a report of a sailor colliding with debris in the bay:

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/14/sport/rio-2016-olympics-dead-fish/index.html

(CNN)The bad news for Rio de Janeiro ahead of the 2016 Olympics keeps coming after scores of dead fish appeared in the Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon.

Wth just over a year to go before the city hosts the Games' rowing and canoe competitions, officials with the legislative assembly of Rio de Janeiro Monday launched an investigation into the causes of death both in the lagoon and in other lakes and bays in the state in which this phenomenon has occurred.

The group will work in partnership with the State Environmental Institute (INEA) and the Secretariat of State for the Environment.

Officials defended the belief that the latest rains caused a temperature change of the water and the excess of decaying organic matter, which would have led to lack of oxygen killing the fish.

The note released by officials highlighted that the amount of dead fish has generated a bad smell and inconvenience to those who live near the lagoon and all the tourists that flock to the area.

Last week newly obtained footage from newspaper O Globo showed a sailor crashing into trash floating on Guanabara Bay.

The incident took place on February 14 and involved professional sailors Breno Osthoff, 20, and Rafael de Almeida Sampaio, 35.

According to Osthoff, the impact was so great the boat was forced onto its side.

Rio de Janeiro has pledged to reduce pollution in the notoriously fetid bay, but last month in an interview with the country's largest sports channel SporTV, Mayor Eduardo Paes admitted that the bay will remain mostly polluted for the games.

"The Olympics are also in a time that has very little rain, then this amount of debris that comes from five municipalities in the metropolitan region, with poor sanitation, is also controllable...I do not see as a problem for the Olympics," said Paes.

Last year biologists said rivers leading into the bay contained a superbacteria that is resistant to antibiotics and can cause urinary, gastrointestinal and pulmonary infections.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why they dont post photos of the Lagoon? They posted photos of the Guanabara Bay again....

I watched a news report about it yesterday, and the cause is not pollution but the seawater inlet of the sea that killed the nutrients and changed the oxygen levels and the temperature of water.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure where to put this but guess it's news.

Pretty terrible.

Apparently the lake is contaminated with raw sewage and pollution runoff... And athletes will be competing in it.

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/video/2015/apr/14/2016-rio-olympics-rowing-dead-fish-video

This is a portuguese point of view (only in pt):

http://www.tvi24.iol.pt/videos/centenas-de-peixes-mortos-no-lago-dos-jo2016/552ce2aa0cf25bc402bae60e/5http://www.tvi24.iol.pt/videos/centenas-de-peixes-mortos-no-lago-dos-jo2016/552ce2aa0cf25bc402bae60e/5

Link to post
Share on other sites

Goiás will be the first Brazilian state to receive the torch of the 2016 Games

The capital of the state, Goias, will be the first city. The complete course of the torch will be revealed in next month.

640px-VacaBravaian.jpg

Goiás will be the first state to receive the Olympic torch of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. The torch of the 2016 Games will be lit in Greece and will arrive in Brazil in May of next year, in Brasilia. After passing the Federal District, the object will come to Goias soil.

The complete list of the Olympic torch relay in Brazil will be made official next month. The object will pass through 250 Brazilian cities, among them all 26 state capitals.
The final destination of the calls will be the Maracana Stadium in Rio, August 5, the date of the official opening of the 2016 Games.
The information was released Thursday by Marco Aurélio Costa Vieira, executive director of operations of the Rio 2016 Committee, and passed on to the governor of Goiás, Marconi Perillo.

Source.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...