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BTW, this issue has nothing to do with Rio de Janeiro and Olympic Games. The security in Brazilian Grand Prix in Sao Paulo is made exclusively by Police Force of Sao Paulo state. It's a problem fo

My God, don't they have enough problems! {couldn't resist}

Uh, maybe because they are great ways to show what's going on in and around Rio. Keep posting please

Not signficnatly dangerous places:

Copacabana Beach

Anywere else the Olympics and Tourists will be in Rio

Until the Olympics are actually there and the security is in place, there will be thieves taking the opportunity to catch people such as the British sailors off guard and mug them. And Copacabana Beach isn't necessarily dangerous, but if you don't watch your stuff, it will get stolen. CNN reporter Anderson Cooper went there on vacation a couple of years ago and had his bag stolen from him from under his friend's beach chair.

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And here we go again with our Brazilianists discuss if what we live in Brazil is right or what they think they know is the ultimate truth...


BTW, next week I'll be in Rio, I'll send some pictures from my dives on the beach for you guys... Summertime in Rio. Some can enjoy, some can hate... That's the world.

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Until the Olympics are actually there and the security is in place, there will be thieves taking the opportunity to catch people such as the British sailors off guard and mug them. And Copacabana Beach isn't necessarily dangerous, but if you don't watch your stuff, it will get stolen. CNN reporter Anderson Cooper went there on vacation a couple of years ago and had his bag stolen from him from under his friend's beach chair.

The same happenedd to me when I was leaving Leicester Square Station, two years ago. That happens every where. However one shouldn´t be so concerned about that even in Copacabana during the Games. Rio has already shown to be very succesful in providing appropriate security in big events. The WC was the last one.

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The same happenedd to me when I was leaving Leicester Square Station, two years ago. That happens every where. However one shouldn´t be so concerned about that even in Copacabana during the Games. Rio has already shown to be very succesful in providing appropriate security in big events. The WC was the last one.

Like my previous signature...

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2015-01-01

New venues, test events, ticket sales... 2015 full of milestones on road to Rio 2016 Games With just over 18 months to go, organisers of first Olympic and Paralympic Games in South America are entering the final straight
rio2016_2015-2_0.jpg
Rio 2016 welcomes in 2015, which will be crammed full of exciting challenges (Photo: Rio 2016)

The Rio 2016 Organising Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games is entering 2015 with a packed agenda. In the year before the greatest show on earth comes to South America for the first time, there will be plenty to get the heart racing. Venues will be completed, tickets will go on sale, more than 20 test events will be staged and the route of the torch relay will be revealed. It’s impossible not to be excited. With just over 18 months until the Maracanã Stadium stages the Rio 2016 Olympic Games opening ceremony, great days lie ahead.

“We enter 2015 knowing it will be a crucial year for us,” said Rio 2016 President Carlos Nuzman. “We have great challenges and deliveries in front of us: the test events, the torch, our culture programme... the countdown starts to enter the final straight and, in a little over a year, Rio de Janeiro and the whole world will witness excellent and memorable Games.”

Here are some of the milestones coming up for Rio 2016 in 2015:

VENUES

With construction progressing at full steam, eight venues are scheduled for completion this year: Carioca Arenas 1, 2 and 3, the Future Arena, Olympic Tennis Centre and Rio Olympic Velodrome, as well as the Main Press Centre (MPC) and International Broadcast Centre (IBC).

TICKETS

Eager to book seats for the first Olympic and Paralympic Games in South America? In 2015 you will be able to. Keep an eye on the Rio 2016 website, because soon you'll have the opportunity to register and receive exclusive information.

TEST EVENTS

A fundamental part of preparing for the Games, test events provide an opportunity for the organising committee and athletes to trial competition venues, and in some cases, give fans a chance to get into the spirit of the Games. In the second half of 2015, more than 20 test events will be staged in the four Games regions across Rio.

TORCH

Curious about the route it will follow and the design of the torch? Details will be revealed in 2015, and the process of selecting torch bearers to participate in the relay will also commence.

CULTURE

The culture programme will be launched this year, opening the way for a great festival in 2016. The idea is to provide the population with access to various forms of artistic expression – dance, music, visual arts, literature, performing arts and popular culture – and encourage the public to submit suggestions for projects.

EDUCATION

Transforma, the Rio 2016 education programme, is set to cross the Rio de Janeiro state boundary in 2015 and reach out to other parts of Brazil. It is designed to promote Olympic and Paralympic values and bring the public closer to the Games. Activities are currently under way in 168 state and municipal schools in Rio, benefitting 100,000 pupils.

LICENSING

Good news for those who are anxious to buy licensed products for the Rio 2016 Games, such as the mascot soft toys. In 2015, the online store will be up and running and the first shops are set to open.

http://www.rio2016.com/en/news/news/new-venues-test-events-ticket-sales-2015-full-of-milestones-on-road-to-rio-2016-games

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  • 4 weeks later...

First info on the torch relay:

- The 26 states + Federal District will be included

- 250 cities visited

- 90~100 days of journey

- 10.000 torchbearers (300m per runner)

- 20.000km by land

- 10.000 miles by air travel

10419983_10153061962569111_8750890738848

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Rio 2016 Olympic torch relay to take spirit of Games to all of Brazil Olympic flame will visit every state in giant country, reaching 90% of population, before lighting cauldron at Maracanã Stadium

The Rio 2016 Olympic torch relay will visit every state in Brazil, carried 20,000km by 10,000 torchbearers, taking the spirit of the Games to every corner of the world’s fifth largest country. As the first details of next year’s event were announced on Thursday (29 January), the organising committee said it was fulfilling its pledge to ensure the Rio Games would be the Brazilian Games.

“Upon being awarded the right to host the 2016 Olympic Games, we promised to involve the entire country, thereby ensuring it would be an event made by Brazilians, for Brazilians and with a Brazilian spirit for the world to enjoy,” said Rio 2016 President Carlos Nuzman. “To stage the Olympic torch relay across the whole country is to fulfil that promise and give millions the chance to participate in an unforgettable celebration.”

From the tropical heat of Amazonas in the north west of the country, to the cooler climes of Rio Grande de Sul in the south, the Olympic flame will travel through each one of Brazil’s 26 states, visiting their capital cities, and the Federal District – home to the nation’s capital, Brasília. The torch will pass through 250 cities and towns, reaching 90 per cent of the Brazilian population.

The journey will begin in the Greek city of Olympia, home of the ancient Olympic Games, when the Olympic flame will be lit in the traditional ceremony. The flame is expected to arrive in Brazil between 90 and 100 days before the start of the Games and – as well as being carried approximately 20,000km by at least 10,000 torchbearers – it will fly about 10,000 miles.

The epic journey will reach its conclusion on 5 August 2016, when the torch will be used to light the Olympic cauldron during the opening ceremony of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the legendary Maracanã Stadium.

The Rio 2016 Olympic torch relay logo (see below) was also unveiled on Thursday (29 January), hinting at the Olympic torch’s design, which will be revealed later this year, along with the relay’s route. The logo’s warm colours reference the flame and the warmth of Brazilians, alluding to what is expected from the Olympic torch relay in Brazil.

logo-tocha.png

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interesting quote..

The Rio 2016 Olympic torch relay logo (see below) was also unveiled on Thursday (29 January), hinting at the Olympic torch’s design, which will be revealed later this year, along with the relay’s route

The Rio 2016 Olympic torch relay logo (see below) was also unveiled on Thursday (29 January), hinting at the Olympic torch’s design, which will be revealed later this year, along with the relay’s route. The logo’s warm colours reference the flame and the warmth of Brazilians, alluding to what is expected from the Olympic torch relay in Brazil.

logo-tocha.png

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It's a shame that the torch does not pass by the other countries in South America. Anyway, Brazil already covers most of the South American territory and various cultures will have the privilege to see the olympic torch.

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It's a shame that the torch does not pass by the other countries in South America. Anyway, Brazil already covers most of the South American territory and various cultures will have the privilege to see the olympic torch.

To an extent I agree with this.

While I'm not a fan of the concept of a worldwide torch relay, a regional specific one (especially in areas where other neighbours aren't likely to host the Olympics anytime soon) can often be a worthwhile idea - yet still I guess expensive.

The Sydney 2000 trek around New Zealand and the Pacific was a great idea.

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To an extent I agree with this.

While I'm not a fan of the concept of a worldwide torch relay, a regional specific one (especially in areas where other neighbours aren't likely to host the Olympics anytime soon) can often be a worthwhile idea - yet still I guess expensive.

The Sydney 2000 trek around New Zealand and the Pacific was a great idea.

I agree. The inclusion of NZ and other South Pacific nations was a big part of why I think the 2000 was so great. It create a feeling that Oceania was the host continent, as opposed to Australia as host nation. I think 2016 should have tried to include other South America countries - at least by visiting the countries that immediately border Brazil, and perhaps their respective capitals.

If money were not an option, I think it would have been nice to have the torch go Athens > South America via Lisbon (obvious reasons) or maybe Mexico City (last Olympics in Latin America, and reiterating 'the Americas' as a whole).

Not every country will draw the sheer ire of China, which resulted in the 'host only' decision after the 2008 protests. I agree that Sochi def made the right choice remaining inside borders for the Olympic relay, but I think London 2012 (if budget allowed) would have been warmly welcomed to select countries around the Commonwealth (perhaps Vancouver, Singapore, Sydney, Christchurch, Durban, Delhi, etc. )

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I still say that for each Olympic Games, the torch should visit the previous hosts as a way of keeping that connection and part of the privilege and esteem of being an Olympic Host, and then tour the host country.

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I still say that for each Olympic Games, the torch should visit the previous hosts as a way of keeping that connection and part of the privilege and esteem of being an Olympic Host, and then tour the host country.

I think would get a little out of hand, to visit 22 previous host cities (and counting) with every edition. It worked in Athens 2004 because of the Greek connection, I think every edition is out of hand. I needs to be culturally/ historically relevant and local.

Having said that, I think Paris could get away with it if they host 2024. With the Pierre association, they could visit every host city SINCE 1924

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No. Athens should've remained a special exception with its grand international relay.

The IOC's rule about relays being domestic affairs is one of the better rulings they've made. The three relays since have been a huge success. London's relay whipped a previously slightly cynical UK into Olympic fever and it was great being able to just take an hour or two off work to see it travel through my local High Street.

It's not broke, they've now got a formula which works, so it doesn't need fixing. And the IOC won't back itself into that corner again anyway.

Brazil doesn't need to change the formula to "show" it's the first South American host. That'll speak for itself if they get everything right.

Edited by Rob.
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